Stabilising Capitalism A Greater Role for Central Banks

Politics, Sociology

Pierluigi Ciocca, “Stabilising Capitalism: A Greater Role for Central Banks”
Josef C. Brada, Wojciech Bienkowski, Masaaki Kuboniwa, “International Perspectives on Financing Higher Education”
I. DUlfano, Isabel Dulfano, “Indigenous Feminist Narratives: I/We: Wo(men) of an(Other) Way”
C. Shih, “Navigating Sovereignty: World Politics Lost in China”
A. Coram, “State, Anarchy, Collective Decisions: Some Applications of Game Theory to Political Economy”

Pierluigi Ciocca, “Stabilising Capitalism: A Greater Role for Central Banks”

2014 | pages: 114 | ISBN: 1349573140 | PDF | 1,4 mb

The role of central banks as a hinge on which the financial system rests has returned to the top of the political agenda in recent years. The global financial crisis has resulted in many changes for central banks, including renewed power in financial supervision and reduced restrictions in their implementation of monetary policies. This book argues that central banks play a key role in financial systems, presenting the European Central Bank as a specific example of an institution that uses its uniquely independent position and wide margins of discretion to provide an array of important functions. It illustrates how central banks promote the security and efficiency of payment systems, pursue price stability, and accommodate the optimal utilization of the resources, labour and capital available to an economy. Stabilising Capitalism demonstrates how these institutions also aid in dealing with the risk of financial collapse and permit the continuity of public expenditure when the government is unable to place securities in the bond market. The author concludes by suggesting that although many consider the idea of this role for central banks to be outdated, these institutions form the root of the capitalist market economy and act as a bastion against financial instability.

Josef C. Brada, Wojciech Bienkowski, Masaaki Kuboniwa, “International Perspectives on Financing Higher Education”

2014 | pages: 197 | ISBN: 1349563889 | PDF | 1,6 mb

Higher education is increasingly important to the labor market success of individuals and the prosperity of nations, yet, as this book shows, public funding for higher education is declining. It presents innovative approaches to increasing funding for universities through closer ties with business and through privatization of universities.

I. DUlfano, Isabel Dulfano, “Indigenous Feminist Narratives: I/We: Wo(men) of an(Other) Way”

2015 | pages: 126 | ISBN: 1349506869 | PDF | 1,8 mb

This book analyzes the literary representation of Indigenous women in Latin American letters from colonization to the twentieth century, arguing that contemporary theorization of Indigenous feminism deconstructs denigratory imagery and offers a (re)signification, (re)semantization and reinvigoration of what it means to be an Indigenous woman.

C. Shih, “Navigating Sovereignty: World Politics Lost in China”

2003 | pages: 226 | ISBN: 134952767X | PDF | 1,0 mb

In this book, the author undertakes a postcolonial analysis of identities the Chinese state uses to confront world politics and globalization. Because these identities are created at the confluence of Western modernity and Confucian tradition, two elements that are continually reinterpreted themselves, the result is an ambiguity regarding the identities best suited to explain Chinese behavior. The author argues that this uncertainty is not a new condition but one that reaches back to end of the nineteenth century. It is by understanding this ambiguity surrounding identities that will in turn help present -day authorities predict the future course of Chinese behavior in world politics.

A. Coram, “State, Anarchy, Collective Decisions: Some Applications of Game Theory to Political Economy”

2001 | pages: 190 | ISBN: 1349418293 | PDF | 0,8 mb

State, Anarchy and Collective Decisions provides an introduction to the applications of game theory to a series of questions that are fundamental in political economy. These questions include: Why do we need states? What might happen without protection for life and property? How might tribes or criminal gangs behave in struggles over material possessions? Would people tell the truth if asked what they wanted?