Social Theory in Archaeology and Ancient History The Present and Future of Counternarratives

Politics, Sociology

Social Theory in Archaeology and Ancient History : The Present and Future of Counternarratives
Los Zetas Inc. : Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico
Gender and Political Violence: Women Changing the Politics of Terrorism by Candice D. Ortbals
An Ecological Theory of Free Expression by Gary Chartier
Peter La Chapelle, “Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California”

Social Theory in Archaeology and Ancient History : The Present and Future of Counternarratives

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1107053331 | 383 Pages | PDF | 12 MB

Recently, a new generation of archaeologists has recognized that large questions of development in societies are fundamentally important, thereby re-validating studying the rise of states, the origin of cities, and the collapse of civilization. These essays demonstrate the importance of large historical questions in case studies of key civilizations.
At a time when archaeology has turned away from questions of the long-term and large scale, this collection of essays reflects on some of the big questions in archaeology and ancient history – how and why societies have grown in scale and complexity, how they have maintained and discarded aspects of their own cultural heritage, and how they have collapsed. In addressing these long-standing questions of broad interest and importance, the authors develop counter-narratives – new ways of understanding what used to be termed ‘cultural evolution’. Encompassing the Middle East and Egypt, India, Southeast Asia, Australia, the American Southwest and Mesoamerica, the fourteen essays offer perspectives on long-term cultural trajectories; on cities, states and empires; on collapse; and on the relationship between archaeology and history. The book concludes with a commentary by one of the major voices in archaeological theory, Norman Yoffee.

Los Zetas Inc. : Criminal Corporations, Energy, and Civil War in Mexico

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1477312757 | 400 Pages | PDF | 12 MB

The rapid growth of organized crime in Mexico and the government’s response to it have driven an unprecedented rise in violence and impelled major structural economic changes, including the recent passage of energy reform. Los Zetas Inc. asserts that these phenomena are a direct and intended result of the emergence of the brutal Zetas criminal organization in the Mexican border state of Tamaulipas. Going beyond previous studies of the group as a drug trafficking organization, Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera builds a convincing case that the Zetas and similar organizations effectively constitute transnational corporations with business practices that include the trafficking of crude oil, natural gas, and gasoline; migrant and weapons smuggling; kidnapping for ransom; and video and music piracy.
Combining vivid interview commentary with in-depth analysis of organized crime as a transnational and corporate phenomenon, Los Zetas Inc. proposes a new theoretical framework for understanding the emerging face, new structure, and economic implications of organized crime in Mexico. Correa-Cabrera delineates the Zetas establishment, structure, and forms of operation, along with the reactions to this new model of criminality by the state and other lawbreaking, foreign, and corporate actors. Since the Zetas share some characteristics with legal transnational businesses that operate in the energy and private security industries, she also compares this criminal corporation with ExxonMobil, Halliburton, and Blackwater (renamed “Academi” and now a Constellis company). Asserting that the elevated level of violence between the Zetas and the Mexican state resembles a civil war, Correa-Cabrera identifies the beneficiaries of this war, including arms-producing companies, the international banking system, the US border economy, the US border security/military-industrial complex, and corporate capital, especially international oil and gas companies.

Gender and Political Violence: Women Changing the Politics of Terrorism by Candice D. Ortbals

English | 11 Mar. 2018 | ISBN: 3319736264 | 372 Pages | EPUB | 2.76 MB

This book examines the role of gender in political conflicts worldwide, specifically the intersection between gender and terrorism. Political violence has historically been viewed as a male domain with men considered the perpetrators of violence and power, and women as victims without power. Whereas men and masculinity are associated with war and aggression, women and femininity conjure up socially constructed images of passivity and peace. This distinction of men as aggressors and women as passive victims denies women their voice and agency. This book investigates how women cope with and influence violent politics, and is both a descriptive and analytical attempt to describe in what ways women are present or absent in political contexts involving political violence, and how they deal with gender assumptions, express gender identities, and frame their actions regarding political violence encountered in their lives. The book looks to reach beyond the notion of women as victims of terrorism or genocide without agency, and to recognize the gendered nature of political conflicts and how women respond to violence. This book will be of interest to advanced undergraduate and graduate students in political science, sociology, cultural studies, and gender studies, academics in terrorism studies and gender studies, government officials, NGOs, and professionals working in areas of violent conflict.

An Ecological Theory of Free Expression by Gary Chartier

English | 14 Apr. 2018 | ISBN: 3319752707 | 164 Pages | EPUB | 705.24 KB

This book advances a comprehensive moral defense of freedom of expression―one with implications for law and policy, but also for the choices of individuals and non-governmental institutions. Gary Chartier seeks to ground expressive freedom in mutually supportive concerns related to themes including property, autonomy, flourishing, and discovery, while seeking to tightly cabin the range of potential injuries that might trigger legal liability for expressive activity. Chartier argues suggestively for an understanding of expressive freedom as rooted and realized in a complex set of social ecosystems that merit protection on multiple grounds and applies it provocatively to a range of contemporary issues.

Peter La Chapelle, “Proud to Be an Okie: Cultural Politics, Country Music, and Migration to Southern California”

2007 | pages: 368 | ISBN: 0520248880 | PDF | 2,4 mb

Proud to Be an Okie brings to life the influential country music scene that flourished in and around Los Angeles from the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s to the early 1970s. The first work to fully illuminate the political and cultural aspects of this intriguing story, the book takes us from Woody Guthrie’s radical hillbilly show on Depression-era radio to Merle Haggard’s “Okie from Muskogee” in the late 1960s. It explores how these migrant musicians and their audiences came to gain a sense of identity through music and mass media, to embrace the New Deal, and to celebrate African American and Mexican American musical influences before turning toward a more conservative outlook. What emerges is a clear picture of how important Southern California was to country music and how country music helped shape the politics and culture of Southern California and of the nation.