Opening the Gates The Lip Affair, 1968-1981

Politics, Sociology

Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981 by Donald Reid
Really Existing Nationalisms: A Post Communist View from Marx and Engels (Radical Thinkers) by Erica Benner
Children of Reunion : Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations
The Bolsheviks Come to Power: The Revolution of 1917 in Petrograd by Alexander Rabinowitch
Brazil: Neoliberalism versus Democracy by Alfredo Saad-Filho, Lecio Morais

Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968-1981 by Donald Reid

2018 | ISBN: 1786635402 | English | 512 pages | EPUB | 3 MB

How the occupation of a watch factory became one of the iconic labor struggles after May 1968
In 1973, faced with massive layoffs, workers at the legendary Lip watch firm in Besançon, France, occupied their factory to demand that no one lose their job. They seized watches and watch parts, assembled and sold watches, and paid their own salaries. Their actions recaptured the ideals of May 1968, when 11 million workers had gone on strike to demand greater autonomy and to overturn the status quo. Educated by ’68, the men and women at the Besançon factory formed committees to control every aspect of what became a national struggle. Female employees developed a working-class feminism, combating workplace sexual harassment and male control of the union. The endurance of the Lip movement and its appeal through the 1970s came from its rich democratic, participatory culture. The factory workers welcomed supporters and engaged with them, an expression of solidarity between blue-collar and student activists that built on the legacy of 1968.
Opening the Gates: The Lip Affair, 1968–1981 is the first account of all facets of the experience, drawing extensively on unpublished materials to reconstruct the vision and practice of those involved. The Lip workers’ struggle was the last widespread expression in France of the belief that creativity and moral autonomy are the driving force of social transformation. It brought about what Sartre called “the extension of the field of possibilities”—not just for workers, but for all those who gave the movement support and meaning.

Really Existing Nationalisms: A Post Communist View from Marx and Engels (Radical Thinkers) by Erica Benner

2018 | ISBN: 1786634783 | English | 288 pages | EPUB | 0.7 MB

An impressive re-examination of the theories of Marx and Engels on nationalism
Really Existing Nationalisms challenges the conventional view that Marx and Engels lacked the theoretical resources needed to understand nationalism. It argues that the two thinkers had a much better explanatory grasp of national phenomena than is usually supposed, and that the reasoning behind their policy towards specific national movements was often subtle and sensitive to the ethical issues at stake.
Instead of offering an insular ‘Marxian’ account of nationalism, the book identifies arguments in Marx and Engels’ writings that can help us to think more clearly about national identity and conflict today. These arguments are located in a distinctive theory of politics, which enabled the authors to analyse the relations between nationalism and other social movements and to discriminate between democratic, outward-looking national programmes and authoritarian, ethnocentric nationalism. Erica Benner suggest that this approach improves on accounts which stress the `independent’ force of nationality over other concerns, and on those that fail to analyse the complex motives of nationalist actors. She concludes by criticising these ‘methodological nationalist’ assumptions and ‘post-nationalist’ views about the future role of nationalism, showing how some of Marx and Engels’ arguments can yield a better understanding of the national movements that have emerged in the wake of ‘really existing socialism’.

Children of Reunion : Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1469630915 | 223 Pages | True PDF | 9.2 MB

In 1961, the U.S. government established the first formalized provisions for intercountry adoption just as it was expanding America’s involvement with Vietnam. Adoption became an increasingly important portal of entry into American society for Vietnamese and Amerasian children, raising questions about the United States’ obligations to refugees and the nature of the family during an era of heightened anxiety about U.S. global interventions. Whether adopting or favoring the migration of multiracial individuals, Americans believed their norms and material comforts would salve the wounds of a divisive war. However, Vietnamese migrants challenged these efforts of reconciliation.
As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many had accepted separations as a painful strategy for survival in the midst of war, most sought, and some eventually found, reunion with their kin. This book makes clear the role of adult adoptees in Vietnamese and American debates about the forms, privileges, and duties of families, and places Vietnamese children at the center of American and Vietnamese efforts to assign responsibility and find peace in the aftermath of conflict.

The Bolsheviks Come to Power: The Revolution of 1917 in Petrograd by Alexander Rabinowitch

2017 | ISBN: 0745399991, 0745399983, 1608467937 | English | 464 pages | EPUB | 11 MB

The Bolsheviks Come to Power is one of the most important histories of the Russian Revolution to challenge the mainstream narratives. Originally published to great acclaim in 2004, this new edition marks the 100th anniversary of one of the explosive and game-changing moments in modern times. In this absorbing narrative, Alexander Rabinowitch counters the claims by mainstream historians that the revolution was a military coup led by Lenin and a small band of fanatics. He refutes the Soviet myth that the party’s triumph in the October Revolution was inevitable, and explains the ebbs and flows of the revolutionary period, tracing the moods of the working class and the political positions of the Bolsheviks at different historical moments, including the immediate aftermath of the February Revolution, the July Days, the Kornilov affair, and up to and including the October Revolution itself. Drawn from a wealth of primary sources and archival material, this new edition of Rabinowitch’s classic account is a must-have for anyone interested in clearing away the tired platitudes of mainstream historians, and reclaiming the revolution on this important anniversary.

Brazil: Neoliberalism versus Democracy by Alfredo Saad-Filho, Lecio Morais

2018 | ISBN: 0745336701, 0745336752 | English | 216 pages | PDF | 6 MB

With the sixth largest economy in the world, Brazil has played a key international role for decades. It was one of the first “pink wave” administrations in Latin America. In 1994, it was responsible for shutting down the US-sponsored proposal for a Free Trade Area of the Americas. Notably, it is also one of the few large countries where social spending has risen and the distribution of income has improved over the last thirty years. As we saw during the 2014 World Cup protests, however, the country still remains highly unequal, with vast unmet social welfare needs and a precarious infrastructure.
In Brazil: Neoliberalism Versus Democracy, Alfredo Saad-Filho and Lecio Morais review the complex paradox that is modern Brazil. Focusing on 1980 to the present, they analyze the tensions between the two dominant systemic political transitions from military rule to first democracy, then neoliberalism. A groundbreaking interpretation of this intricate relationship, Brazil examines how the contradictory dynamics of these transitions eventually became symbiotic as they unfolded and intertwined.