Global Entanglements of a Man Who Never Traveled A Seventeenth-Century Chinese Christian and His Conflicted Worlds

History / Military

Global Entanglements of a Man Who Never Traveled: A Seventeenth-Century Chinese Christian and His Conflicted Worlds (Columbia Studies in International and Global History) by Dominic Sachsenmaier
J. Low, N. Myhill, “Imagining the Audience in Early Modern Drama, 1558-1642”
Travis Jeppesen, “See You Again in Pyongyang: A Journey into Kim Jong Un’s North Korea”
The Prophets: Who They Were, What They Are by Norman Podhoretz
Walden Pond: A History by W. Barksdale Maynard

Global Entanglements of a Man Who Never Traveled: A Seventeenth-Century Chinese Christian and His Conflicted Worlds (Columbia Studies in International and Global History) by Dominic Sachsenmaier

English | May 29th, 2018 | ISBN: 0231187521 | 280 Pages | EPUB | 15.35 MB

Born into a low-level literati family in the port city of Ningbo, the seventeenth-century Chinese Christian convert Zhu Zongyuan likely never left his home province. Yet Zhu nonetheless led a remarkably globally connected life. His relations with the outside world, ranging from scholarly activities to involvement with globalizing Catholicism, put him in contact with a complex and contradictory set of foreign and domestic forces.
In Global Entanglements of a Man Who Never Traveled, Dominic Sachsenmaier explores the mid-seventeenth-century world and the worldwide flows of ideas through the lens of Zhu‘s life, combining the local, regional, and global. Taking particular aspects of Zhu‘s multiple belongings as a starting point, Sachsenmaier analyzes the contexts that framed his worlds as he balanced a local life and his border-crossing faith. At the local level, the book pays attention to the intellectual, political, and social environments of late Ming and early Qing society, including Confucian learning and the Manchu conquest, questioning the role of ethnic and religious identities. At the global level, it considers how individuals like Zhu were situated within the history of organizations and power structures such as the Catholic Church and early modern empires amid larger transformations and encounters. A strikingly original work, this book is a major contribution to East Asian, transnational, and global history, with important implications for historical approaches and methodologies.

J. Low, N. Myhill, “Imagining the Audience in Early Modern Drama, 1558-1642”

2011 | pages: 219 | ISBN: 1349293105 | PDF | 4,4 mb

This essay collection builds on the latest research on the topic of theatre audiences in early modern England. In broad terms, the project answers the question, ‘How do we define the relationships between performance and audience?’.

Travis Jeppesen, “See You Again in Pyongyang: A Journey into Kim Jong Un’s North Korea”

ISBN: 0316509159 | 2018 | EPUB | 320 pages | 17 MB

From terrifying missile tests to the war of words between President Trump and Kim Jong Un–not to mention stranger-than-fiction stories of purges and assassinations–news from North Korea dominates global headlines. But what is life there actually like?
In See You Again in Pyongyang, Travis Jeppesen, the first American to complete a university program in North Korea, culls from his experiences living, traveling, and studying in the country to create a multifaceted portrait of the country and its idiosyncratic capital city in the Kim Jong Un Era.
Anchored by the experience of his five trips to North Korea and his interactions with citizens from all walks of life, Jeppesen takes readers behind the propaganda, showing how the North Korean system actually works in daily life. He challenges the notion that Pyongyang is merely a “showcase capital” where everything is staged for the benefit of foreigners, as well as the idea that Pyongyangites are brainwashed robots. Jeppesen introduces readers to an array of fascinating North Koreans, from government ministers with a side hustle in black market Western products to young people enamored with American pop culture.
With unique personal insight and a rigorous historical grounding, Jeppesen goes beyond the media cliches, showing North Koreans in their full complexity. See You Again in Pyongyang is an essential addition to the literature about one of the world’s most fascinating and mysterious places.

The Prophets: Who They Were, What They Are by Norman Podhoretz

English | May 29th, 2018 | ISBN: 0743219279 | 400 Pages | EPUB | 3.38 MB

A radical reinterpretation of the biblical prophets by one of America’s most provocative critics reveals the eternal beauty of their language and the enduring resonance of their message.
Long before Norman Podhoretz became one of the intellectual leaders of American neoconservatism, he was a student of Hebrew literature and a passionate reader of the prophets of the Old Testament. Returning to them after fifty years, he has produced something remarkable: an entirely new perspective on some of the world’s best-known works.
Or, rather, three new perspectives. The first is a fascinating account of the golden age of biblical prophecy, from the eighth to the fifth century B.C.E., and its roots in earlier ages of the ancient Israelite saga. Thus, like large parts of the Bible itself, The Prophets is a history of the Near East from the point of view of a single nation, covering not only what is known about the prophets themselves – including Elijah, Amos, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel – but also the stories of King David, King Saul, and how the ancient Israelites were affected by the great Near Eastern empires that surrounded them. Layered into this work of history is a piece of extraordinary literary criticism. Podhoretz’s very close reading of the verse and imagery used by the biblical prophets restores them to the top reaches of the poetic pantheon, for these books contain, unequivocally, some of the greatest poetry ever written.
The historical chronicle and the literary criticism will transport readers to a time that is both exotic and familiar and, like any fine work of history or literature, will evoke a distinct and original world. But the third perspective of The Prophets is that of moral philosophy, and it serves to bring the prophets’ message into the twenty-first century. For to Norman Podhoretz, the real relevance of the prophets today is more than the excitement of their history or the beauty of their poetry: it is their message. Podhoretz sees, in the words of the biblical prophets, a war being waged, a war against the sin of revering anything made by the hands of man – in short, idolatry. In their relentless battle against idolatry, Podhoretz finds the prophets’ most meaningful and enduring message: a stern warning against the all-consuming worship of self that is at least as relevant in the twenty-first century as it was three thousand years ago.
The Prophets will earn the respect of biblical scholars and the fascinated attention of general readers; its observations will be equally valued by believers and nonbelievers, by anyone with spiritual yearnings. Learned, provocative, and beautifully written, The Prophets is a deeply felt, deeply satisfying work that is at once history, literary criticism, and moral philosophy – a tour de force.

Walden Pond: A History by W. Barksdale Maynard

English | 12 Feb. 2004 | ISBN: 0195168410 | 418 Pages | PDF | 8 MB

Perhaps no other natural setting has as much literary, spiritual, and environmental significance for Americans as Walden Pond. Some 700,000 people visit the pond annually, and countless others journey to Walden in their mind, to contemplate the man who lived there and what the place means to us today.