Eastern Europe in 1968 Responses to the Prague Spring and Warsaw Pact Invasion

History / Military

David Gardner, “Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups: Who Killed Marilyn Monroe, JFK, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, and Princess Diana?”
Raising Heirs to the Throne in Nineteenth-Century Spain: The Education of the Constitutional Monarch by Richard Meyer Forsting
Richard Pipes, “Communism: A History (Modern Library Chronicles)”
Eastern Europe in 1968: Responses to the Prague Spring and Warsaw Pact Invasion by Kevin McDermott
From Empires Servant to Global Citizen: A History of Massey University by Michael Belgrave

David Gardner, “Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups: Who Killed Marilyn Monroe, JFK, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, and Princess Diana?”

ISBN: 1510731407 | 2018 | EPUB | 292 pages | 4 MB

Uncover the real truth behind mass media accounts of how they died, and learn the reason for their murders.
These five deaths stopped the whole world in its tracks. We all famously recall where we were and what we were doing when JFK was assassinated, as well as the moments Elvis, Princess Diana, and Michael Jackson died. As for Marilyn Monroe, the candle flickered out long ago, but only now can the truth be told about how―and why―she died.
After combing through thousands of recently declassified FBI files and interviewing key witnesses, crime analysts, and forensic experts during years of research, investigative writer David Gardner has unearthed new information that will transform the way we look at these iconic tragedies that have long fascinated and intrigued the general public. Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups reveals that Elvis Presley died not as a self-obsessed caricature but as a genuine hero who may have signed his death warrant going undercover for the FBI; how Marilyn Monroe’s secret affairs with JFK and his brother, Robert, left her in the crosshairs of a lethal conspiracy; why Princess Diana’s death was no accident; who ordered President John F. Kennedy’s assassination; and how on three occasions Michael Jackson “died” of painkiller drug overdoses in the months before his death.
In the wake of new evidence and testimonies, Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups provides many of the answers that have been elusive for so long, while explaining what it was about these enduring legends that made their legacies burn so bright.

Raising Heirs to the Throne in Nineteenth-Century Spain: The Education of the Constitutional Monarch by Richard Meyer Forsting

English | PDF,EPUB | 2018 | 274 Pages | ISBN : 3319754890 | 7.73 MB

This book analyses royal education in nineteenth-century, constitutional Spain. Its main subjects are Isabel II (1830- 1904), Alfonso XII (1857-1885) and Alfonso XIII (1886-1941) during their time as monarchs-in-waiting. Their upbringing was considered an opportunity to shape the future of Spain, reflected the political struggles that emerged during the construction of a liberal state, and allowed for the modernisation of the monarchy. The education of heirs to the throne was taken seriously by contemporaries and assumed wider political, social and cultural significance.
This volume is structured around three powerful groups which showed an active interest, influenced, and significantly shaped royal education: the court, the military, and the public. It throws new light on the position of the Spanish monarchy in the constitutional state, its ability to adapt to social, political, and cultural change, and its varied sources of legitimacy, power, and attraction.

Richard Pipes, “Communism: A History (Modern Library Chronicles)”

ISBN: 0679640509, 0812968646 | 2001 | EPUB | 175 pages | 183 KB

With astonishing authority and clarity, Richard Pipes has fused a lifetime’s scholarship into a single focused history of Communism, from its hopeful birth as a theory to its miserable death as a practice. At its heart, the book is a history of the Soviet Union, the most comprehensive reorganization of human society ever attempted by a nation-state. This is the story of how the agitation of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, two mid-nineteenth-century European thinkers and writers, led to a great and terrible world religion that brought down a mighty empire, consumed the world in conflict, and left in its wake a devastation whose full costs can only now be tabulated.

Eastern Europe in 1968: Responses to the Prague Spring and Warsaw Pact Invasion by Kevin McDermott

English | PDF,EPUB | 2018 | 321 Pages | ISBN : 3319770683 | 4.02 MB

This collection of thirteen essays examines reactions in Eastern Europe to the Prague Spring and Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Countries covered include the Soviet Union and specific Soviet republics (Ukraine, Moldavia, the Baltic States), together with two chapters on Czechoslovakia and one each on East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, Yugoslavia and Albania. The individual contributions explain why most of these communist regimes opposed Alexander Dubček’s reforms and supported the Soviet-led military intervention in August 1968, and why some stood apart. They also explore public reactions in Eastern Europe to the events of 1968, including instances of popular opposition to the crushing of the Prague Spring, expressions of loyalty to Soviet-style socialism, and cases of indifference or uncertainty. Among the many complex legacies of the East European ‘1968’ was the development of new ways of thinking about regional identity, state borders, de-Stalinisation and the burdens of the past.

From Empires Servant to Global Citizen: A History of Massey University by Michael Belgrave

English | May 29th, 2018 | ISBN: 0994132506 | 228 Pages | EPUB | 19.38 MB

When Massey’s first students attended lectures in the agricultural college headed by visionary scientists Geoffrey Peren and William Riddet in 1928, their arrival was a major milestone. New Zealand politicians, academics and farming leaders had been wrangling over what an agricultural college should be and where it should be located for 15 years prior. For a time, the only thing that could be agreed on was that in order to transform the country’s agriculture and help feed the Empire, there did need to be one.
Massey brought science to New Zealand farming and created a culture of research rigour. Massey also came early to an international approach, welcoming the first generation of Colombo Plan students and continuing its research and contract relationships across the globe. In From Empire’s Servant to Global Citizen, distinguished historian Professor Michael Belgrave details the academic determination and political will that drove Massey’s creation, and the myriad changes across its history. It’s a candid account of one of New Zealand’s most progressive and entrepreneurial universities.