Conspiracies Declassified The Skeptoid Guide to the Truth Behind the Theories

History / Military

Conspiracies Declassified: The Skeptoid Guide to the Truth Behind the Theories by Brian Dunning
Socialist Senses : Film, Feeling, and the Soviet Subject, 1917–1940
The Turks and Islam in Reformation Germany
The Battle for North Africa : El Alamein and the Turning Point for World War II
Madeleine’s Children : Family, Freedom, Secrets, and Lies in France’s Indian Ocean Colonies

Conspiracies Declassified: The Skeptoid Guide to the Truth Behind the Theories by Brian Dunning

English | June 5th, 2018 | ISBN: 1507206992 | 257 Pages | EPUB | 1.21 MB

A collection of the wildest conspiracies to ever exist, from mind control experiments to lizard people, this book explores, debunks—and sometimes proves—the secret stories that don’t quite make it into the history books.
What’s fact and what’s fiction? With conspiracy theories, sometimes it’s hard to get to the truth!
In Conspiracies Declassified, author and expert skeptic Brian Dunning explains fifty true stories of famous conspiracies throughout history. From the moon landing hoax, to chemtrails, to the mind control dangers of fluoride, Dunning is here to sort the truth from the lies to tell you what really happened.

Socialist Senses : Film, Feeling, and the Soviet Subject, 1917–1940

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0253026946 | 428 Pages | PDF | 12 MB

In a major reimagining of the history and cultural impact of Soviet film, noted film scholar Emma Widdis explores the fundamental transformations in how film, through the senses, remade the Soviet self in the 1920s and 1930s. Following the Russian Revolution, there was a shared ambition for a ‘sensory revolution’ to accompany political and social change: Soviet men and women were to be reborn into a revitalized relationship with the material world. Cinema was seen as a privileged site for the creation of this sensory revolution as film could both discover the world anew and model a way of inhabiting it. Drawing on an extraordinary array of films, Widdis shows how Soviet cinema, as it evolved from the revolutionary avant-garde to Socialist Realism, gradually shifted its materialist agenda from emphasizing the external senses to instilling the appropriate internal senses (consciousness, emotions) in the new Soviet subject.
“Outstanding and important scholarship that unites many important topics with new insights and original analysis … nobody has tried to think about Soviet film within this theoretical frame.” – Oksana Bulgakowa, author of Sergei Eisenstein: A Biography
“A brilliant and pioneering analysis of debates around Soviet selfhood in the 1920s and 1930s. It is a work of rare and exciting scholarly originality, written with elegance and lucidity.” – Julian Graffy, Professor Emeritus of Russian Literature and Film, University College London

The Turks and Islam in Reformation Germany

English | 2018 | ISBN: 1138300233 | 268 Pages | PDF | 3.91 MB

Although their role is often neglected in standard historical narratives of the Reformation, the Ottoman Turks were an important concern of many leading thinkers in early modern Germany, including Martin Luther. In the minds of many, the Turks formed a fearsome, crescent-shaped horizon that threatened to break through and overwhelm. Based on an analysis of more than 300 pamphlets and other publications across all genres and including both popular and scholarly writings, this book is the most extensive treatment in English on views of the Turks and Islam in German-speaking lands during this period. In addition to providing a summary of what was believed about Islam and the Turks in early modern Germany, this book argues that new factors, including increased contact with the Ottomans as well as the specific theological ideas developed during the Protestant Reformation, destabilized traditional paradigms without completely displacing inherited medieval understandings. This book makes important contributions to understanding the role of the Turks in the confessional conflicts of the Reformation and to the broader history of Western views of Islam.

The Battle for North Africa : El Alamein and the Turning Point for World War II

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0253031427 | 300 Pages | PDF | 4.46 MB

In the early years of World War II, Germany shocked the world with a devastating blitzkrieg, rapidly conquered most of Europe, and pushed into North Africa. As the Allies scrambled to counter the Axis armies, the British Eighth Army confronted the experienced Afrika Corps, led by German field marshal Erwin Rommel, in three battles at El Alamein. In the first battle, the Eighth Army narrowly halted the advance of the Germans during the summer of 1942. However, the stalemate left Nazi troops within striking distance of the Suez Canal, which would provide a critical tactical advantage to the controlling force. War historian Glyn Harper dives into the story, vividly narrating the events, strategies, and personalities surrounding the battles and paying particular attention to the Second Battle of El Alamein, a crucial turning point in the war that would be described by Winston Churchill as “the end of the beginning.” Moving beyond a simple narrative of the conflict, The Battle for North Africa tackles critical themes, such as the problems of coalition warfare, the use of military intelligence, the role of celebrity generals, and the importance of an all-arms approach to modern warfare.

Madeleine’s Children : Family, Freedom, Secrets, and Lies in France’s Indian Ocean Colonies

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0190233885 | 340 Pages | True PDF | 7.93 MB

Madeleine’s Children uncovers a multigenerational saga of an enslaved family in India and two islands, Reunion and Mauritius, in the eastern empires of France and Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A tale of legal intrigue, it reveals the lives and secret relationships between slaves and free people that have remained obscure for two centuries. As a child, Madeleine was pawned by her impoverished family and became the slave of a French woman in Bengal. She accompanied her mistress to France as a teenager, but she did not challenge her enslavement there on the basis of France’s Free Soil principle, a consideration that did not come to light until future lawyers investigated her story. In France, a new master and mistress purchased her, despite laws prohibiting the sale of slaves within the kingdom. The couple transported Madeleine across the ocean to their plantation in the Indian Ocean colonies, where she eventually gave birth to three children: Maurice, Constance, and Furcy. One died a slave and two eventually became free, but under very different circumstances. On 21 November 1817, Furcy exited the gates of his master’s mansion and declared himself a free man. The lawsuit waged by Furcy to challenge his wrongful enslavement ultimately brought him before the Royal Court of Paris, despite the extreme measures that his putative master, Joseph Lory, deployed to retain him as his slave. A meticulous work of archival detection, Madeleine’s Children investigates the cunning, clandestine, and brutal strategies that masters devised to keep slaves under their control-and paints a vivid picture of the unique and evolving meanings of slavery and freedom in the Indian Ocean world.