Child Labor in the British Victorian Entertainment Industry 1875-1914

Cultures / Languages

Child Labor in the British Victorian Entertainment Industry: 1875–1914 by Dyan Colclough
Mark Hale, Charles Reiss, “The Phonological Enterprise”
For All Waters : Finding Ourselves in Early Modern Wetscapes
Managing Cultural Differences, 10th Edition: Global Leadership for the 21st Century
Wordplay and Powerplay in Latin Poetry by Phillip Mitsis, Lecturer in Classics Ioannis Ziogas

Child Labor in the British Victorian Entertainment Industry: 1875–1914 by Dyan Colclough

English | 2015 | ISBN: 134955569X | 256 Pages | PDF | 7.3 MB

Child labor greatly contributed to the cultural and economic success of the British Victorian theatrical industry. This book highlights the complexities of the battle for child labor laws, the arguments for the needs of the theatre industry, and the weight of opposition that confronted any attempt to control employers.

Mark Hale, Charles Reiss, “The Phonological Enterprise”

2008 | pages: 305 | ISBN: 0199533970 | PDF | 1,8 mb

This book scrutinizes recent work in phonological theory from the perspective of Chomskyan generative linguistics and argues that progress in the field depends on taking seriously the idea that phonology is best studied as a mental computational system derived from an innate base, phonological Universal Grammar. Two simple problems of phonological analysis provide a frame for a variety of topics throughout the book. The competence-performance distinction and markedness theory are both addressed in some detail, especially with reference to phonological acquisition. Several aspects of Optimality Theory, including the use of Output-Output Correspondence, functionalist argumentation and dependence on typological justification are critiqued. The authors draw on their expertise in historical linguistics to argue that diachronic evidence is often mis-used to bolster phonological arguments, and they present a vision of the proper use of such evidence. Issues of general interest for cognitive scientists, such as whether categories are discrete and whether mental computation is probabilistic are also addressed. The book ends with concrete proposals to guide future phonological research.
The breadth and depth of the discussion, ranging from details of current analyses to the philosophical underpinnings of linguistic science, is presented in a direct style with as little recourse to technical language as possible.

For All Waters : Finding Ourselves in Early Modern Wetscapes

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1517900476 | 334 Pages | PDF | 2.6 MB

Recent years have witnessed a surge in early modern ecostudies, many devoted to Shakespearean drama. Yet in this burgeoning discipline, travel writing appears moored in historicization, inorganic subjects are far less prevalent than organic ones, and freshwater sites are hardly visited. For All Waters explores these uncharted wetscapes.
Lowell Duckert shows that when playwrights and travel writers such as Sir Walter Raleigh physically interacted with rivers, glaciers, monsoons, and swamps, they composed “hydrographies,” or bodily and textual assemblages of human and nonhuman things that dissolved notions of human autonomy and its singular narrativity. With a playful, punning touch woven deftly into its theoretical rigor, For All Waters disputes fantasies of ecological solitude that would keep our selves high and dry and that would try to sustain a political ecology excluding water and the poor. The lives of both humans and waterscapes can be improved simultaneously through direct engagement with wetness.
For All Waters concludes by investigating waterscapes in peril today–West Virginia’s chemical rivers and Iceland’s vanishing glaciers–and outlining what we can learn from early moderns’ eco-ontological lessons. By taking their soggy and storied matters to heart, and arriving at a greater realization of our shared wetness, we can conceive new directions to take within the hydropolitical crises afflicting us today.

Managing Cultural Differences, 10th Edition: Global Leadership for the 21st Century

Routledge | English | 2018 | ISBN-10: 113822345X | 662 pages | PDF | 11.11 mb

by Neil Remington Abramson (Author), Robert T. Moran (Author)
In today’s global business environment, it is vital that individuals and organizations have sophisticated global leadership skills. Communication and understanding of different cultures is paramount to business success.
This new edition of the bestselling textbook, Managing Cultural Differences, guides students and practitioners to an understanding of how to do business internationally, providing practical advice on how competitive advantage can be gained through effective cross-cultural management. Crises in the Middle East, the weakening of some emerging markets, and the value of diversity and inclusion are just a few examples of contemporary issues discussed in this text, which also introduces a completely new chapter on global business ethics.
With a wealth of new examples, case studies, and online materials, this textbook is required course reading for undergraduates, postgraduates, and MBA students alike, as well as being a vital tool for anybody selling, purchasing, traveling, or working internationally.
About the Author
Neil Remington Abramson is a professor of International Strategy (ret.) at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.
Robert T. Moran is Professor Emeritus of International Management at Thunderbird School of Global Management, USA.

Wordplay and Powerplay in Latin Poetry by Phillip Mitsis, Lecturer in Classics Ioannis Ziogas

English | 2016 | ISBN: 311047252X | 458 Pages | PDF | 6.1 MB

The political allegiances of major Roman poets have been notoriously difficult to pin down, in part because they often shift the onus of political interpretation from themselves to their readers. By the same token, it is often difficult to assess their authorial powerplays in the etymologies, puns, anagrams, telestichs, and acronyms that feature prominently in their poetry. It is the premise of this volume that the contexts of composition, performance, and reception play a critical role in constructing poetic voices as either politically favorable or dissenting, and however much the individual scholars in this volume disagree among themselves, their readings try to do justice collectively to poetry’s power to shape political realities. The book is aimed not only at scholars of Roman poetry, politics, and philosophy, but also at those working in later literary and political traditions influenced by Rome’s greatest poets.