Walt Whitman The Measure of His Song, 2nd Revised Edition

Poetry

Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song, 2nd Revised Edition edited by Jim Perlman, Ed Folsom, Dan Campion
Andrew Mattison, “The Unimagined in the English Renaissance: Poetry and the Limits of Mimesis”
The Complete Shorter Poetry of George Eliot (The Pickering Masters) by George Eliot, edited by Antonie Gerard van den Broek
Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond: Poetic Variety in Medieval Iceland and Norway (Fordham Series in Medieval Studies) edited by Martin Chase
William L. Randall, Elizabeth McKim, “Reading Our Lives: The Poetics of Growing Old”

Walt Whitman: The Measure of His Song, 2nd Revised Edition edited by Jim Perlman, Ed Folsom, Dan Campion

English | 1998 | ISBN: 0930100786 | EPUB | 536 pages | 2.3 MB

First published to wide critical acclaim in 1981, revised and expanded in 1998, and now re-issued as a corrected second edition (2014), this monumental anthology charts the ongoing American and international response to the legacy of the seminal poet Walt Whitman (1819-1892). Beginning with Ralph Waldo Emerson’s famous 1855 letter (“I greet you at the beginning of a great career…”), this edition contains responses from Thoreau, Pound, Lawrence, Neruda, Borges, Ginsberg, Jordan, Duncan, Le Sueur, Rich, Snyder and Alexie, among many others
“I know of no more convincing proof of Walt Whitman’s impact upon the poetic mind (both at home and abroad) than this collection of tributes by poets – in prose and verse” – Gay Wilson Allen, The Solitary Singer.

Andrew Mattison, “The Unimagined in the English Renaissance: Poetry and the Limits of Mimesis”

ISBN: 161147597X, 1611477719 | 2012 | EPUB | 186 pages | 569 KB

When we read poetry, we tend to believe that we are getting a glimpse of the interior of the poet’s mind—pictures from the poet’s imagination relayed through the representative power of language. But poets themselves sometimes express doubt (usually indirectly) that poetic language has the capability or the purpose of revealing these images. This book examines description in Renaissance poetry, aiming to reveal its complexity and variability, its distinctiveness from prose description, and what it can tell us about Renaissance ways of thinking about the visible world and the poetic mind. Recent criticism has tended to address representation as a product of culture; The Unimagined in the English Renaissance argues to the contrary that attention to description as a literary phenomenon can complicate its cultural context by recognizing the persistent problems of genre and literary history. The book focuses on Sidney, Spenser, Donne, and Milton, who had very different aims as poets but shared a degree of skepticism about imagistic representation. For these poets, description can obscure as much as it makes visible, and can create whole categories of existence that are outside of visibility altogether.

The Complete Shorter Poetry of George Eliot (The Pickering Masters) by George Eliot, edited by Antonie Gerard van den Broek

English | February 1, 2005 | ISBN: 1851967966 | EPUB | 640 pages | 2.2 MB

Presents George Eliot’s shorter poetry. This volume includes an introduction, which discusses Eliot’s interest in poetry verse and its relation to her prose and prose fiction; her recurring themes and motifs; the poetry’s critical reception and its value to modern readers.

Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond: Poetic Variety in Medieval Iceland and Norway (Fordham Series in Medieval Studies) edited by Martin Chase

English | June 2, 2014 | ISBN: 0823257819 | EPUB | 296 pages | 1.4 MB

Eddic, Skaldic, and Beyond shines light on traditional divisions of Old Norse–Icelandic poetry and awakens the reader to work that blurs these boundaries. Many of the texts and topics taken up in these enlightening essays have been difficult to categorize and have consequently been overlooked or undervalued. The boundaries between genres (Eddic and Skaldic), periods (Viking Age, medieval, early modern), or cultures (Icelandic, Scandinavian, English, Continental) may not have been as sharp in the eyes and ears of contemporary authors and audiences as they are in our own. When questions of classification are allowed to fade into the background, at least temporarily, the poetry can be appreciated on its own terms.
Some of the essays in this collection present new material, while others challenge long-held assumptions. They reflect the idea that poetry with “medieval” characteristics continued to be produced in Iceland well past the fifteenth century, and even beyond the Protestant Reformation in Iceland (1550). This superb volume, rich in up-to-date scholarship, makes little-known material accessible to a wide audience.

William L. Randall, Elizabeth McKim, “Reading Our Lives: The Poetics of Growing Old”

2008 | pages: 342 | ISBN: 0195306872 | PDF | 1,2 mb

Against the background of Socrates’ insight that the unexamined life is not worth living, Reading Our Lives: The Poetics of Growing Old investigates the often overlooked inside dimensions of aging. Despite popular portrayals of mid- and later life as entailing inevitable decline, this book looks at aging as, potentially, a process of poiesis: a creative endeavor of fashioning meaning from the ever-accumulating texts – memories and reflections-that constitute our inner worlds. At its center is the conviction that although we are constantly reading our lives to some degree anyway, doing so in a mindful matter is critical to our development in the second half of life.
Drawing on research in numerous disciplines affected by the so-called narrative turn – including cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and the psychology of aging – authors Randall and McKim articulate a vision of aging that promises to accommodate such time-honored concepts as wisdom and spirituality: one that understands aging as a matter not merely of getting old but of consciously growing old.