Time, Religion and History

Religion related

William Gallois, “Time, Religion and History”
William Frederick, “The Coming Epiphany”
Denis Minns, Paul Parvis, trans., “Justin, Philosopher and Martyr: Apologies”
Hubertus R Drobner, “Gregory of Nyssa: Homilies on the Beatitudes”
Journey into Europe: Islam, Immigration, and Identity by Akbar Ahmed

William Gallois, “Time, Religion and History”

English | 2007 | ISBN: 0582784522 | PDF | pages: 304 | 1.5 mb

What is time? How does our sense of time lead us to approach the world? How did the peoples of the past view time? This book answers these questions through an investigation of the cultures of time in Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Judaism and the Australian Dreamtime. It argues that our contemporary world is blind as to the significance and complexity of time, preferring to believe that time is ‘natural’ and unchanging. This is of critical importance to historians since the base matter of their study is time, yet there is almost no theoretical literature on time in history.
This book offers the first detailed historiographical study of the centrality of time to human cultures. It sets out the complex ways in which ideas of time developed in the major world religions, and the manner in which such conceptions led people both to live in ways very different to our contemporary world and to make very different kinds of ‘histories’. It goes on to argue that modern scientific descriptions of time, such as Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, lie much closer to the complex understandings of time in religions such as Christianity than they do to our ‘common-sense’ notions of time which are centred on progress through a past, present and future.

William Frederick, “The Coming Epiphany”

2017 | pages: 298 | ISBN: 1430313838 | PDF | 2,6 mb

Your Guide To Understanding End Times Bible Prophecy The end of the world is fast approaching! Do you know what is going to happen and when? The Coming Epiphany takes a broad and comprehensive look at the end times through the eyes of scripture and explains to the reader the events that are going to occur in an easy to understand format. What scripture reveals about the end times may not be what you think! Do you know when to expect the rapture? Do you know why 2017 and 2021 are shaping up to be key years in prophecy? Do you know what scripture reveals about America and her role in the end times? Do you know what scripture reveals about the coming financial collapse, WWIII, aliens, the New World Order, and planet x? Do you know how the Jewish feasts will coincide with major prophetic events? Do you know when in the sequence of end times events that the rapture will occur and can you prove it from scripture? The Coming Epiphany will answer these questions and many more. thecomingepiphany.com

Denis Minns, Paul Parvis, trans., “Justin, Philosopher and Martyr: Apologies”

English | 2009 | ISBN: 0199542503 | PDF | pages: 356 | 16.7 mb

Justin Martyr (c.100-165) was one of the key apologists of the Early Church. Oxford Early Christian Texts presents a new critical edition of the Greek text of the Apologies with introduction, English translation, and textual commentary.
Editors Denis Minns and Paul Parvis take a searching look at the text transmitted by the single fourteenth-century manuscript containing the works of Justin. They attempt to see behind the work of the Byzantine editor, and his predecessors, who sought to make sense of the badly damaged text before them. The commentary is designed not merely to annotate the text but to identify and draw out Justin’s train of thought and the structure of his argument. It explains the readings adopted in the text by setting Justin’s Greek within his Christian, Hellenistic, and philosophical contexts.
The introduction traces the complex history of the text in manuscript and print and discusses the puzzling relationship of the Second Apology to the First, and suggests a new solution. Justin is located against the background of the diversity of Christianity in the second century. A new understanding of Justin emerges from this work. His thought is often sharper, and his language more pointed than has been recognised, and the difficulty of the task he set himself of bridging the enormous gap between two cultures is clearly shown.

Hubertus R Drobner, “Gregory of Nyssa: Homilies on the Beatitudes”

English | 2000 | ISBN: 9004116214 | PDF | pages: 714 | 34.1 mb

These proceedings present the first English translation of Gregory’s Homilies on the Beatitudes by Stuart Hall, accompanied by a thorough commentary by Anthony Meredith, Andreas Spira, Francoise Vinel, Lucas Mateo-Seco, Thomas Bohm, Karl-Heinz Uthemann, Claudio Moreschini, and Robert Wilken. Eight more contributions by Monique Alexandre, Peter Bruns, Judith Kovacs, Salvatore Lilla, Friedhelm Mann, Alden Mosshammer, Elias Moutsoulas, and Lucian Turcescu focus on further general and particular topics of the homilies as their eschatology, the meaning of the word makarios in all of Gregory’s works, the notion of justice, and Gregory’s Theology of Adoption, as well as their relationship to Syriac theology, Clement of Alexandria, Neoplatonism, and Gregory’s Homilies on the Song of Songs. The third and fourth part add ten studies reflecting the present overall state of Gregorian research.

Journey into Europe: Islam, Immigration, and Identity by Akbar Ahmed

English | March 1st, 2018 | ASIN: B01N4UASVY, ISBN: 0815727585 | 599 pages | EPUB | 55.39 MB

An unprecedented, richly, detailed, and clear-eyed exploration of Islam in European history and civilization
Tensions over Islam were escalating in Europe even before 9/11. Since then, repeated episodes of terrorism together with the refugee crisis have dramatically increased the divide between the majority population and Muslim communities, pushing the debate well beyond concerns over language and female dress. Meanwhile, the parallel rise of right-wing, nationalist political parties throughout the continent, often espousing anti-Muslim rhetoric, has shaken the foundation of the European Union to its very core.
Many Europeans see Islam as an alien, even barbaric force that threatens to overwhelm them and their societies. Muslims, by contrast, struggle to find a place in Europe in the face of increasing intolerance. In tandem, anti-Semitism and other forms of discrimination cause many on the continent to feel unwelcome in their European homes.
Akbar Ahmed, an internationally renowned Islamic scholar, traveled across Europe over the course of four years with his team of researchers and interviewed Muslims and non-Muslims from all walks of life to investigate questions of Islam, immigration, and identity. They spoke with some of Europe’s most prominent figures, including presidents and prime ministers, archbishops, chief rabbis, grand muftis, heads of right-wing parties, and everyday Europeans from a variety of backgrounds. Their findings reveal a story of the place of Islam in European history and civilization that is more interwoven and complex than the reader might imagine, while exposing both the misunderstandings and the opportunities for Europe and its Muslim communities to improve their relationship. Along with an analysis of what has gone wrong and why, this urgent study, the fourth in a quartet examining relations between the West and the Muslim world, features recommendations for promoting integration and pluralism in the twenty-first century.