The Denkoroku or The Record of the Transmission of the Light

Religion related

Keizan Zenji, Hubert Nearman Reverend, Rev. Hubert Nearman O.B.C., “The Denkoroku: or The Record of the Transmission of the Light”
Alexander R. Pruss, “One Body: An Essay in Christian Sexual Ethics”
John F. Kutsko, “Between Heaven and Earth: Divine Presence and Absence in the Book of Ezekiel”
Douglas H. Parker, “An exhortation to the diligent studye of scripture and An exposition into the seventh chaptre of the pistle to the Corinthians”
Spiritual Titanism: Indian, Chinese, and Western Perspectives (SUNY series in Constructive Postmodern Thought) by Nicholas F. Gier

Keizan Zenji, Hubert Nearman Reverend, Rev. Hubert Nearman O.B.C., “The Denkoroku: or The Record of the Transmission of the Light”

2001 | pages: 331 | ISBN: 0930066227 | PDF | 0,8 mb

Attributed to the thirteenth-century Zen Master Keizan (1268-1325), the Denkoroku tells of the enlightenment of the fifty-three masters, beginning with Shakyamuni Buddha and concluding with the twelfth-century Zen Master Ejyo, who was Dogen’s dharma heir. Keizan explores how the personal koan (spiritual question) of the various disciples was resolved so that they fully realized their inherent enlightenment. By use of his kaleidoscopic view of Buddhist teachings, Keizan reveals the myriad ways in which the Unborn has been experienced and how these experiences relate to one’s daily practice. The translator, Rev. Hubert Nearman, is a senior disciple of the late Rev. Master Jiyu-Kennett, first Abbess of Shasta Abbey in California, and founder of the Order of Buddhist Contemplatives. Prior to becoming a monk, he was a scholar and translator of medieval Japanese texts and was a recipient of a grant for his translation work from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Alexander R. Pruss, “One Body: An Essay in Christian Sexual Ethics”

2012 | pages: 478 | ISBN: 026803897X | PDF | 1,2 mb

This important philosophical reflection on love and sexuality from a broadly Christian perspective is aimed at philosophers, theologians, and educated Christian readers. Alexander R. Pruss focuses on foundational questions on the nature of romantic love and on controversial questions in sexual ethics on the basis of the fundamental idea that romantic love pursues union of two persons as one body.
One Body begins with an account, inspired by St. Thomas Aquinas, of the general nature of love as constituted by components of goodwill, appreciation, and unitiveness. Different forms of love, such as parental, collegial, filial, friendly, fraternal, or romantic, Pruss argues, differ primarily not in terms of goodwill or appreciation but in terms of the kind of union that is sought. Pruss examines romantic love as distinguished from other kinds of love by a focus on a particular kind of union, a deep union as one body achieved through the joint biological striving of the sort involved in reproduction. Taking the account of the union that romantic love seeks as a foundation, the book considers the nature of marriage and applies its account to controversial ethical questions, such as the connection between love, sex, and commitment and the moral issues involving contraception, same-sex activity, and reproductive technology. With philosophical rigor and sophistication, Pruss provides carefully argued answers to controversial questions in Christian sexual ethics. “This is a terrific—really quite extraordinary—work of scholarship. It is quite simply the best work on Christian sexual ethics that I have seen. It will become the text that anyone who ventures into the field will have to grapple with—a kind of touchstone. Moreover, it is filled with arguments with which even secular writers on sexual morality will have to engage and come to terms.” —Robert P. George, Princeton University
“One Body is an excellent piece of philosophical-theological reflection on the nature of sexuality and marriage. This book has the potential to become a standard go-to text for professors and students working on sex ethics issues, whether in philosophy or theology, both for the richness of its arguments, and the scope of its coverage of cases. ” —Christopher Tollefsen, University of South Carolina “Alexander Pruss here develops sound and humane answers to the whole range of main questions about human sexual and reproductive choices. His principal argument for the key answers is very different from the one I have articulated over the past fifteen years. But his argumentation is at every point attractively direct, careful, energetic in framing and responding to objections, and admirably attentive to realities and the human goods at stake.” —John Finnis, University of Oxford

John F. Kutsko, “Between Heaven and Earth: Divine Presence and Absence in the Book of Ezekiel”

1999 | pages: 200 | ISBN: 1575060418 | PDF | 1,4 mb

With the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple and the exile of members of the Israelite community to the land of its enemies, whose gods were represented as divine statues, the prophet Ezekiel faced a challenge: how to respond to the enemies’ taunts that Israel’s God was absent, whereas the foreigners’ gods self-evidently were present. Thus, to ask the question, “Where is God” was to face several complex and tangled problems. How is God to be represented? How is Yahweh to be differentiated from other deities? What is Yahweh’s relationship to Israel in exile?
Kutsko sets out to answer these questions within the theme of divine presence and absence, particularly as it relates to the kabod theology in Ezekiel. He shows that God’s absence becomes, for Ezekiel, an argument for his presence and power, while the presence of idols indicated their absence and impotence. Ezekiel extends this proposition into a corollary: God’s presence is not consigned to sanctuary, for God is a sanctuary. In this regard, absence from the Temple is a message of judgment and the precursor to a message of restoration. If God can become a sanctuary, his presence in exile becomes a message of victory even over imperial powers. This conceptualization of Yahweh, then, ends up defining the power and position of Israel’s God in distinctively universal terms. In this contribution, the book of Ezekiel plays a central and previously unappreciated role in the development of Israelite theology, and monotheism in particular.

Douglas H. Parker, “An exhortation to the diligent studye of scripture and An exposition into the seventh chaptre of the pistle to the Corinthians”

2000 | pages: 254 | ISBN: 0802048188 | PDF | 11,8 mb

Douglas Parker presents an old-spelling, critical edition of William Roye’s English translation of Erasmus’ “An exhortation to the diligent studye of scripture (or Paraclesis)”, and Martin Luther’s “An exposition in to the seventh chaptre of the pistle to the Corinthians” (his commentary on St. Paul’s 1 Corinthians 7), first published together in 1529.
Roye’s translation of Erasmus’ Paraclesis was momentous because it underscored the reformers’ call for a vernacular Bible, thereby providing them with a voice of authority that conservative forces could not ignore. Roye’s translation of Luther was the first full-scale English rendering of a work by the great arch-heretic, and its subject matter (the iniquities of the unmarried clergy) suggested a unity of vision between European and English reformers. Most importantly, these two tracts were published together, ironically enough, thereby suggesting a unity of vision that neither Erasmus nor Luther would have been prepared to countenance.
Parker’s thorough volume includes: a literary/historical introduction situating the text and explaining its importance for the English reform movement; an essay on the fidelity of Roye’s English renderings of the original Latin and German texts; commentary that glosses difficult readings, identifies all biblical and secular references, provides analogues from early English reformation tracts and from some of Erasmus’ and Luther’s other writings. This is a critical work for scholars of the English reformation movement.

Spiritual Titanism: Indian, Chinese, and Western Perspectives (SUNY series in Constructive Postmodern Thought) by Nicholas F. Gier

English | April 1, 2000 | ISBN: 0791445275, 0791445283 | PDF | 302 pages | 3.7 MB

A comparative philosophical consideration of the extremes of humanism, or “Titanism,” this book critiques trends in Eastern and Western philosophy and examines solutions to them.
This work in comparative philosophy uses the concept of Titanism to critique certain trends in both Eastern and Western philosophy. Titanism is an extreme form of humanism in which human beings take on divine attributes and prerogatives. The author finds the most explicit forms of spiritual Titanism in the Jaina, Samkhya, and Yoga traditions, where yogis claim powers and knowledge that in the West are only attributed to God. These philosophies are also radically dualistic, and liberation involves a complete transcendence of the body, society, and nature. Five types of spiritual Titanism are identified; and, in addition to this typology, a heuristic based on Nietzsche’s three metamorphoses of camel, lion, and child is offered. The book determines that answers to spiritual Titanism begin not only with the Hindu Goddess religion, but also are found in Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism, especially Zen Buddhism and Confucianism.

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