Sacred Matters Material Religion in South Asian Traditions

Religion related

Sacred Matters: Material Religion in South Asian Traditions edited by Corinne G. Dempsey, Tracy Pintchman
Sean Whittle, “Researching Catholic Education: Contemporary Perspectives”
Nehemia Levtzion, Randall L. Pouwels, “The History Of Islam In Africa”
Greg Forbes, “The God of Old: The Role of the Lukan Parables in the Purpose of Luke’s Gospel”
Jordan M. Scheetz, “The Concept of Canonical Intertextuality and the Book of Daniel”

Sacred Matters: Material Religion in South Asian Traditions edited by Corinne G. Dempsey, Tracy Pintchman

English | December 1, 2015 | ISBN: 1438459432, 1438459424 | PDF | 232 pages | 9.5 MB

Explores how objects shape the worlds of religious participants across a range of South Asian traditions.
Sacred Matters explores the lives of material objects in South Asian religions. Spanning a range of traditions including Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Buddhism, and Christianity, the book demonstrates how sacred items influence and enliven the worlds of religious participants across South Asia and into the diaspora. Contributors examine a variety of objects to describe the ways sacred materials derive and confer meaning and efficacy, emerging from and giving shape to religious and nonreligious realms alike. Material forms of deity and divine power are considered along with commonplace ritual items, including images, clay pots, and camphor. The work also attends to materiality’s complex role within the “materially suspicious” contexts of Islam, Theravada Buddhism, and Roman Catholicism. This engaging collection presents new frameworks for contemplating the ways in which historical, social, and sacred processes intertwine and collectively shape human and divine activity.

Sean Whittle, “Researching Catholic Education: Contemporary Perspectives”

2018 | ISBN-10: 9811078076 | 256 pages | PDF | 3 MB

This book presents a range of perspectives on the current state of Catholic education in the opening decades of the twenty-first century. All of the chapters have their origin in an International Conference on Catholic Education, held at Heythrop College (University of London) in September 2016. The book brings together many leading scholars to present a survey of the latest research on Catholic education in areas such as the aims of Catholic education, Catholic schools and Catholic identity, leadership issues in Catholic schools and fresh thinking about the place of Religious Education (RE) in Catholic Education.
This book demonstrates how the field of Catholic Education Studies has firmly come of age. Rather than being a subfield of educational or theological discourse, it is now an established field of research and study. As such, the book invites readers to engage with much of the new thinking on Catholic education that has grown rapidly in recent years. It offers a broad range of contemporary perspectives on research in Catholic Education and rich insights into current thinking about Catholic Education.

Nehemia Levtzion, Randall L. Pouwels, “The History Of Islam In Africa”

2000 | pages: 411 | ISBN: 0821412965 | PDF | 11,3 mb

The history of the Islamic faith on the continent of Africa spans fourteen centuries. For the first time in a single volume, The History of Islam in Africa presents a detailed historic mapping of the cultural, political, geographic, and religious past of this significant presence on a continent-wide scale. Bringing together two dozen leading scholars, this comprehensive work treats the historical development of the religion in each major region and examines its effects.
Without assuming prior knowledge of the subject on the part of its readers, The History of Islam in Africa is broken down into discrete areas, each devoted to a particular place or theme and each written by experts in that particular arena. The introductory chapters examine the principal “gateways” from abroad through which Islam traditionally has influenced Africans. The following two parts present overviews of Islamic history in West Africa and the Sudanic zone, and in subequatorial Africa. In the final section, the authors discuss important themes that have had an impact on Muslim communities in Africa.
Designed as both a reference and a text, The History of Islam in Africa will be an essential tool for libraries, scholars, and students of this growing field.

Greg Forbes, “The God of Old: The Role of the Lukan Parables in the Purpose of Luke’s Gospel”

2000 | pages: 393 | ISBN: 1841271314 | PDF | 20,7 mb

This book is a study of the parables unique to the Third Gospel, aiming in particular to establish a link between Luke’s choice of these parables and his overall purpose in writing. In comparison to the synoptic kingdom parables, one distinguishing feature of the Lukan parables is their more personal portrait of the character and the nature of God himself. Luke’s desire is to demonstrate to his readers, whoever they are, that in Christianity the realization of the Jewish hope has occurred. The parables promote this idea by offering both continuity (OT) and contrast (contemporary Judaism) in their portrait of God. Thus, as well as operating in a parenetic sense, the parables also help to legitimize Luke’s argument regarding fulfilment.

Jordan M. Scheetz, “The Concept of Canonical Intertextuality and the Book of Daniel”

English | 2012 | ISBN: 0227680200 | PDF | pages: 176 | 1.3 mb

In Concept of Canonical Intertextuality and the Book of Daniel, the author undertakes to make the concepts of intertextuality and canon criticism more comprehensible in the field of biblical studies. This volume is a combination of, on the one hand, an observation of intertextuality, canon criticism, inner-biblical exegesis, intratextuality and kanonische intertextuelle Lektuere and, on the other hand, an inductive study of the Masoretic Text of Daniel, of its connections with other texts of the Hebrew Bible, and of clear passages in the Greek text of the New Testament. Scheetz uses the Masoretic Text of Daniels as an appropriate testing ground through the medium of its multilingual character, its diverging placement in various biblical canons, and its concrete citations in some texts of the New Testament. The end result of this study is a theory of canonical intertextuality unique in its definition in relation to the theories investigated, as well as in its application to an entire biblical book and to other texts in the Old and New Testaments.