Rome, Pollution and Propriety Dirt, Disease and Hygiene in the Eternal City from Antiquity to Modernity

History / Military

Technicals: Non-Standard Tactical Vehicles from the Great Toyota War to modern Special Forces (New Vanguard) by Leigh Neville
The Hardest Part: A Centenary Critical Edition by G.A. Studdert Kennedy
The Dutch Resistance Revealed: The Inside Story of Courage and Betrayal by Jos Scharrer
The Army and the Indonesian Genocide: Mechanics of Mass Murder by Jess Melvin
Rome, Pollution and Propriety: Dirt, Disease and Hygiene in the Eternal City from Antiquity to Modernity (British School at Rome Studies) edited by Mark Bradley

Technicals: Non-Standard Tactical Vehicles from the Great Toyota War to modern Special Forces (New Vanguard) by Leigh Neville

English | 19 Apr. 2018 | ISBN: 147282251X | 48 Pages | AZW3/MOBI/EPUB/PDF (conv) | 33 MB

Over the last 30 years, the ‘technical’ or armed pick-up truck has become arguably the most ubiquitous military land vehicle of modern warfare.
Harking back to the armed Jeeps and Chevrolet trucks of the SAS and Long Range Desert Group in North Africa in World War II, the world’s first insurgent technicals were those of the Sahrawi People’s Liberation Army in Algeria in the late 1970s, followed by the Chadian use of technical in the so-called Toyota War against Libya. Since then, technicals have seen use in Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, as well as being used by Western and Russian Special Forces.
Fully illustrated with commissioned artwork and providing rigorous analysis, this is the first history of how this deceptively simple fighting vehicle has been used and developed in conflicts worldwide.

The Hardest Part: A Centenary Critical Edition by G.A. Studdert Kennedy

English | 30 Apr. 2018 | ISBN: 033405656X | 288 Pages | A/MOBI/EPUB/PDF (conv) | 7.74 MB

Stark, moving but with glimmers of humour amongst the wreckage, “The Hardest Part” asks perhaps the hardest question of all when faced with the horrors of the 1st World War – where was God to be found in the carnage of the western front?
Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy’s answer, that through the cross God shares in human suffering rather than being a ‘passionate potentate’ looking down unmoved by death, injury and destruction on an immense scale, was, and still is, revolutionary.
Marking the centenary both of the end of the First World War and the original publication of The Hardest Part, this new critical edition contains a contextual introduction, a brief biography of Studdert Kennedy, annotated bibliography and the full text of the first edition of the book, with explanatory notes.
Contents:
The Man, the Padre and the Theologian – Thomas O’Loughlin
Gone and Almost Forgotten: The Reception of ‘The Hardest Part’ – Stuart Bell
The Hardest Part – the 1918 text
Dedication
Preface
Author’s Introduction:
1. What is God like?
2. God in Nature
3. God in History
4. God in the Bible
5. God and Democracy
6. God and Prayer
7. God and the Sacrament
8. God and the Church
9. God and the Life Eternal
Postscript

The Dutch Resistance Revealed: The Inside Story of Courage and Betrayal by Jos Scharrer

English | 3 Apr. 2018 | ISBN: 1526728133 | 192 Pages | AZW3/MOBI/EPUB/PDF (conv) | 10.49 MB

The Dutch resistance movement during the Nazi occupation was bedevilled by treachery, betrayal and poor organization and support from London. Despite these serious problems, the brave men and women of the Dutch resistance who refused to accept domination by their brutal oppressors, made a significant contribution to the war effort albeit at a terrible cost. Their contribution which included escape routes for Allied aircrew and acts of sabotage has been largely over-looked. While the author focuses on the activity and fate of her husband’s father, Henry Scharrer, her superbly researched book ranges far wider. As well as introducing a large cast of resistance workers, double agents and Nazis, she describes many of the operations, successful and disastrous, and analyses the results. Too often, as in Henry Scharrer’s case, the outcome was tragic. This gripping true account of extraordinary heroism and betrayal demonstrates both the best and worst of human conduct in extreme conditions.

The Army and the Indonesian Genocide: Mechanics of Mass Murder by Jess Melvin

English | 2018 | ISBN: 1138574694 | 350 Pages | PDF | 7.5 MB

For the past half century, the Indonesian military has depicted the 1965-66 killings, which resulted in the murder of approximately one million unarmed civilians, as the outcome of a spontaneous uprising. This formulation not only denied military agency behind the killings, it also denied that the killings could ever be understood as a centralised, nation-wide campaign.
Using documents from the former Indonesian Intelligence Agency’s archives in Banda Aceh this book shatters the Indonesian government’s official propaganda account of the mass killings and proves the military’s agency behind those events. This book tells the story of the 3,000 pages of top-secret documents that comprise the Indonesian genocide files. Drawing upon these orders and records, along with the previously unheard stories of 70 survivors, perpetrators, and other eyewitness of the genocide in Aceh province it reconstructs, for the first time, a detailed narrative of the killings using the military’s own accounts of these events. This book makes the case that the 1965-66 killings can be understood as a case of genocide, as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention.
The first book to reconstruct a detailed narrative of the genocide using the army’s own records of these events, it will be of interest to students and academics in the field of Southeast Asian Studies, History, Politics, the Cold War, Political Violence and Comparative Genocide.

Rome, Pollution and Propriety: Dirt, Disease and Hygiene in the Eternal City from Antiquity to Modernity (British School at Rome Studies) edited by Mark Bradley

English | August 27, 2012 | ISBN: 1107014433, 1316626598 | PDF | 342 pages | 9.3 MB

Rome, Pollution and Propriety brings together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to examine the historical continuity of dirt, disease and hygiene in one environment, and to explore the development and transformation of these ideas alongside major chapters in the city’s history, such as early Roman urban development, Roman pagan religion, the medieval Church, the Renaissance, the Unification of Italy, and the advent of Fascism.

This volume sets out to identify the defining characteristics, functions and discourses of pollution in Rome in such realms as disease and medicine, death and burial, sexuality and virginity, prostitution, purity and absolution, personal hygiene and morality, criminality, bodies and cleansing, waste disposal, decay, ruins and urban renovation, as well as studying the means by which that pollution was policed and controlled.