New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge

Susana Nuccetelli – New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge
Machig Labdron and the Foundations of Chod by Jerome Edou
Either/Or: Part I by Søren Kierkegaard, edited and translated by Howard V. Hong, Edna H. Hong
Either/Or: Part II by Søren Kierkegaard, edited and translated by Howard V. Hong, Edna H. Hong
How to Win an Argument: An Ancient Guide to the Art of Persuasion by Marcus Tullius Cicero, edited and translated by James M. May

Susana Nuccetelli – New Essays on Semantic Externalism and Self-Knowledge

Published: 2003-05-09 | ISBN: 0262140837, 0262527693 | PDF | 330 pages | 1.15 MB

Semantic externalism is the thesis that the contents of some words and thoughts depend in part on properties external to the person who entertains them. In a departure from the widely held doctrine of internalism, externalists maintain that not all mental content is local to the mind. That view, however, seems to some philosophers to be at odds with our ordinary intuitions about self-knowledge. This book shows that the debate over the compatibility of externalism and self-knowledge has led to the investigation of a variety of topics, including the a priori, transmission of epistemic warrant, question-begging reasoning, and the semantics of natural-kind terms, as well as other issues crucial to epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language. The essays in the book make clear that externalism and self-knowledge raise many questions and that there are many paths to answering them. The best way to deal with the competing arguments, the editor claims, is to follow a principle of doxastic conservatism, which recommends that, when possible, one should favor the strategy that best accommodates all of the most accepted intuitions at stake.

Machig Labdron and the Foundations of Chod by Jerome Edou

English | November 21st, 2017 | ASIN: B06ZZ9QLNL, ISBN: 1559390395 | 396 Pages | EPUB | 2.22 MB

Machig Labdron is popularly considered to be both a dakini and a deity, an emanation of Yum Chenmo, or Prajnaparamita, the embodiment of the wisdom of the buddhas. Historically, this Tibetan woman, a contemporary of Milarepa, was an adept and outstanding teacher, a mother, and a founder of a unique transmission lineage known as the Chöd of Mahamudra.
This translation of the most famous biography of Machig Labdron, founder of the unique Mahamudra Chöd tradition, is presented together with a comprehensive overview of Chöd’s historical and doctrinal origins in Indian Buddhism and its subsequent transmission to Tibet.
Chöd refers to cutting through the grasping at a self and its attendant emotional afflictions. Most famous for its teaching on transforming the aggregates into an offering of food for demons as a compassionate act of self-sacrifice, Chöd aims to free the mind from all fear and to arouse realization of its true nature, primordially clear bliss and emptiness.

Either/Or: Part I by Søren Kierkegaard, edited and translated by Howard V. Hong, Edna H. Hong

English | April 21, 2013 | ISBN: 0691073155, 0691020418, ASIN: B00BNY0S18 | AZW3 | 725 pages | 3 MB

Søren Kierkegaard, the nineteenth-century Danish philosopher rediscovered in the twentieth century, is a major influence in contemporary philosophy, religion, and literature. He regarded Either/Or as the beginning of his authorship, although he had published two earlier works on Hans Christian Andersen and irony.
The pseudonymous volumes of Either/Or are the writings of a young man (I) and of Judge William (II). The ironical young man’s papers include a collection of sardonic aphorisms; essays on Mozart, modern drama, and boredom; and “The Seducer’s Diary.” The seeming miscellany is a reflective presentation of aspects of the “either,” the esthetic view of life.
Part II is an older friend’s “or,” the ethical life of integrated, authentic personhood, elaborated in discussions of personal becoming and of marriage. The resolution of the “either/or” is left to the reader, for there is no Part III until the appearance of Stages on Life’s Way. The poetic-reflective creations of a master stylist and imaginative impersonator, the two men write in distinctive ways appropriate to their respective positions.

Either/Or: Part II by Søren Kierkegaard, edited and translated by Howard V. Hong, Edna H. Hong

English | April 21, 2013 | ISBN: 0691073163, 0691020426, ASIN: B00BNY0RZK | AZW3 | pages | 2.9 MB

Søren Kierkegaard, the nineteenth-century Danish philosopher rediscovered in the twentieth century, is a major influence in contemporary philosophy, religion, and literature. He regarded Either/Or as the beginning of his authorship, although he had published two earlier works on Hans Christian Andersen and irony. The pseudonymous volumes of Either/Or are the writings of a young man (I) and of Judge William (II). The ironical young man’s papers include a collection of sardonic aphorisms; essays on Mozart, modern drama, and boredom; and “The Seducer’s Diary.” The seeming miscellany is a reflective presentation of aspects of the “either,” the esthetic view of life.
Part II is an older friend’s “or,” the ethical life of integrated, authentic personhood, elaborated in discussions of personal becoming and of marriage. The resolution of the “either/or” is left to the reader, for there is no Part III until the appearance of Stages on Life’s Way. The poetic-reflective creations of a master stylist and imaginative impersonator, the two men write in distinctive ways appropriate to their respective positions.

How to Win an Argument: An Ancient Guide to the Art of Persuasion by Marcus Tullius Cicero, edited and translated by James M. May

English | October 4, 2016 | ISBN: 0691164339, ASIN: B01EBEIKX4 | AZW3 | 288 pages | 0.6 MB

All of us are faced countless times with the challenge of persuading others, whether we’re trying to win a trivial argument with a friend or convince our coworkers about an important decision. Instead of relying on untrained instinct―and often floundering or failing as a result―we’d win more arguments if we learned the timeless art of verbal persuasion, rhetoric. How to Win an Argument gathers the rhetorical wisdom of Cicero, ancient Rome’s greatest orator, from across his works and combines it with passages from his legal and political speeches to show his powerful techniques in action. The result is an enlightening and entertaining practical introduction to the secrets of persuasive speaking and writing―including strategies that are just as effective in today’s offices, schools, courts, and political debates as they were in the Roman forum.
How to Win an Argument addresses proof based on rational argumentation, character, and emotion; the parts of a speech; the plain, middle, and grand styles; how to persuade no matter what audience or circumstances you face; and more. Cicero’s words are presented in lively translations, with illuminating introductions; the book also features a brief biography of Cicero, a glossary, suggestions for further reading, and an appendix of the original Latin texts.
Astonishingly relevant, this unique anthology of Cicero’s rhetorical and oratorical wisdom will be enjoyed by anyone who ever needs to win arguments and influence people―in other words, all of us.