Mating in Captivity A Memoir

Biographies

Mating in Captivity: A Memoir by Helen Zuman
As Green as Grass: Growing Up Before, During & After the Second World War by Emma Smith
My Prison Without Bars by Pete Rose, Rick Hill
Led Zeppelin IV (Rock of Ages) by Barney Hoskyns
Living Large: A Big Man’s Ideas on Weight, Success, and Acceptance by Michael S. Berman, Laurence Shames

Mating in Captivity: A Memoir by Helen Zuman

English | May 8th, 2018 | ASIN: B074CWSQBR, ISBN: 1631523376 | 248 Pages | EPUB | 0.92 MB

When recent Harvard grad Helen Zuman moved to Zendik Farm in 1999, she was thrilled to discover that the Zendiks used go-betweens to arrange sexual assignations, or “dates,” in cozy shacks just big enough for a double bed and a nightstand. Here, it seemed, she could learn an honest version of the mating dance—and form a union free of “Deathculture” lies.
No one spoke the truth: Arol, the Farm’s matriarch, crushed any love that threatened her hold on her followers’ hearts. An intimate look at a transformative cult journey, Mating in Captivity shows how stories can trap us and free us, how miracles rise out of crisis, how coercion feeds on forsaken self-trust.

As Green as Grass: Growing Up Before, During & After the Second World War by Emma Smith

English | September 24, 2013 | ISBN: 1408835614, 1408835630 | EPUB | 320 pages | 2.2 MB

Uprooted from her beloved Great Western Beach, Emma Smith moves with her family from Newquay to the Devonshire village of Crapstone. But the dust has hardly settled when tragedy strikes, and Emma’s father, a DSO-decorated hero of the Great War, is so frustrated by the hardship of life as a lowly bank clerk and by his thwarted artistic ambitions that he suffers a catastrophic breakdown – from which disaster Emma’s resourceful mother rallies courageously.
Then, in 1939, the war again becomes a reality. Emma’s sister Pam at once enlists with the WAAF and Jim, her politically minded brother, after initially declaring himself a pacifist, joins the RAF. But what should Emma, aged only sixteen, do? Secretarial collage equips her for a job with MI5 but it’s dull work and Emma yearns for fresh air. She is rescued by a scheme taking on girls as crew for canal boats. Freedom!
The war over, Emma travels to India with a documentary film company, lives in Chelsea, falls in love in France and spends time in Paris where she sets about mending a broken heart by writing her first novel. Sitting beside the Seine during a heatwave with her typewriter on her knees, she is unwittingly snapped by legendary photographer Robert Doisneau.
The zest, thirst for life and buoyant spirits of Emma, as she recalls in evocative detail the quality of England in the thirties and forties give As Green as Grass the feel of a ready-made classic.

My Prison Without Bars by Pete Rose, Rick Hill

English | January 8th, 2004 | ASIN: B008OI4WMW, ISBN: 1579549276 | 341 Pages | EPUB | 2.88 MB

Pete Rose holds more Major League Baseball records than any other player in history. He stands alone as baseball’s hit king having shattered the previously “unbreakable” record held by Ty Cobb. He is a blue-collar hero with the kind of old-fashioned work ethic that turned great talent into legendary accomplishments.
Pete Rose is also a lifelong gambler and a sufferer of oppositional defiant disorder. For the past 13 years, he has been banned from baseball and barred from his rightful place in the Hall of Fame– accused of violating MLB’s one taboo. Rule 21 states that no one associated with baseball shall ever gamble on the game. The punishment is no less than a permanent barring from baseball and exclusion from the Hall of Fame.
Pete Rose has lived in the shadow of his exile. He has denied betting on the game that he loves. He has been shunned by MLB, investigated by the IRS, and served time for tax charges in the U.S. Penitentiary in Marion, Illinois.
But he’s coming back.
Pete Rose has never been forgotten by the fans who loved him throughout his 24-year career. The men he played with have stood by him. In this, his first book since his very public fall from grace, Pete Rose speaks with great candor about all the outstanding questions that have kept him firmly in the public eye. He discloses what life was like behind bars, discusses the turbulent years of his exile, and gives a vivid picture of his early life and baseball career. He also confronts his demons, tackling the ugly truths about his gambling and his behavior.
My Prison Without Bars is Pete Rose’s full accounting of his life. No one thinks he’s perfect. He has made mistakes–big ones. And he is finally ready to admit them.

Led Zeppelin IV (Rock of Ages) by Barney Hoskyns

English | November 28th, 2006 | ASIN: B004GJXYDQ, ISBN: 1594863709 | 178 Pages | EPUB | 0.83 MB

Led Zeppelin IV, often called heavy metal’s greatest album, kicks off an exciting new series that takes a fresh, in-depth look at some of the greatest works from the most influential artists of the rock era. Fans may know the songs, but wait until they hear the stories behind them!
The music contained in Led Zeppelin IV is part of the soundtrack to a generation. Released in 1971, it rocks, stomps, glides, and shimmers as it covers all the bases the band had mastered: heavy blues, barroom rock and roll, mandolin-driven folk, epic Tolkien-infused mysticism, acoustic Americana, and more. Certified gold one week after its release, the album went to on the U.S. charts and in the U.K. It remained on U.S. charts for 259 weeks.
There probably isn’t an aspiring rock guitarist anywhere who hasn’t plucked out the notes and chords to “Stairway to Heaven” or “Black Dog,” and yet many music lovers are unaware of the intriguing backstory to this genre-defining work.
To this day there is confusion about what is the actual title of the album. And what about those mysterious symbols? Barney Hoskyns pierces those veils and more as he tells the fascinating story of the evocative set that cemented Led Zeppelin’s standing as the biggest, baddest, loudest band in the world—and that remains today the apex of their art.

Living Large: A Big Man’s Ideas on Weight, Success, and Acceptance by Michael S. Berman, Laurence Shames

English | March 7th, 2006 | ASIN: B004GHMICQ, ISBN: 159486277X | 306 Pages | EPUB | 0.40 MB

A poignant, funny, and, above all, honest look at obesity from the inside out. Is it the goal of life to be thin? Or to be happy? In this inspiring story, those two elusive goals become one, as a fat man learns acceptance, loses the guilt, and gains the wisdom to manage his weight.
You can hardly pick up a magazine or turn on the TV today without encountering a torrent of talk on weight. But all too rarely do we hear from overweight people themselves—especially men—about how life feels inside the body of a fat person. Mike Berman shares that story in this hopeful and uplifting memoir.
A self-proclaimed “fat man” who is also a happy man—successful in his career, marriage, and friendships—Berman has earned his insight and peace of mind through decades of personal struggle. In Living Large, this well-known political activist and Washington lobbyist never shies away from the pain and daunting challenges of being seriously overweight. But Berman has an important message that he wants to be heard: Fatness is not a moral failing, but a disease; and once it is accepted as such, it can be successfully managed.

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