Erhard S. Gerstenberger, “Theologies in the Old Testament”

Religion related

Erhard S. Gerstenberger, “Theologies in the Old Testament”
Anand Vivek Taneja, “Jinnealogy: Time, Islam, and Ecological Thought in the Medieval Ruins of Delhi”
Yonten & Per K. Sorensen Dargye, “Play of the omniscient : life and works of Jamgon Ngawang Gyaltshen : an eminent 17th-18th century Drukpa master”
Gustavo Martin-Asensio, “Transitivity-Based Foregrounding in the Acts of the Apostles: A Functional-Grammatical Approach to the Lukan Perspective”
Francis Gerald Downing, “Making Sense in (and of) the First Christian Century”

Erhard S. Gerstenberger, “Theologies in the Old Testament”

2002 | pages: 370 | ISBN: 056708812X | PDF | 47,8 mb

Internationally renowned scholar Erhard Gerstenberger here offers a radical departure from traditional treatments. Rather than a systematic approach to theological topics in the Old Testament, Gerstenberger discusses its various theological voices rooted in different social settings within ancient Israel: the family and clan, the village, the tribal group, and the kingdom. Further, he discusses the variety of Israel’s views concerning the divine-polytheism, syncretism, and monotheism. Gerstenberger concludes with his reflections on how contemporary theology is informed by the biblical witness and how it must be contextual and ecumenical in order to be authentic.

Anand Vivek Taneja, “Jinnealogy: Time, Islam, and Ecological Thought in the Medieval Ruins of Delhi”

2017 | ISBN-10: 150360179X, 1503603938 | 336 pages | PDF | 3 MB

In the ruins of a medieval palace in Delhi, a unique phenomenon occurs: Indians of all castes and creeds meet to socialize and ask the spirits for help. The spirits they entreat are Islamic jinns, and they write out requests as if petitioning the state. At a time when a Hindu right wing government in India is committed to normalizing a view of the past that paints Muslims as oppressors, Anand Vivek Taneja’s Jinnealogy provides a fresh vision of religion, identity, and sacrality that runs counter to state-sanctioned history.
The ruin, Firoz Shah Kotla, is an unusually democratic religious space, characterized by freewheeling theological conversations, DIY rituals, and the sanctification of animals. Taneja observes the visitors, who come mainly from the Muslim and Dalit neighborhoods of Delhi, and uses their conversations and letters to the jinns as an archive of voices so often silenced. He finds that their veneration of the jinns recalls pre-modern religious traditions in which spiritual experience was inextricably tied to ecological surroundings. In this enchanted space, Taneja encounters a form of popular Islam that is not a relic of bygone days, but a vibrant form of resistance to state repression and post-colonial visions of India.

Yonten & Per K. Sorensen Dargye, “Play of the omniscient : life and works of Jamgon Ngawang Gyaltshen : an eminent 17th-18th century Drukpa master”

2008 | pages: 311 | ISBN: 9993617067, 9993661600 | PDF | 10,8 mb

A pioneering study on the reigning school of Mhayana Buddhism in Bhutan and traces the development of the Drukpa Kagyud school which became the state religion of Bhutan.

Gustavo Martin-Asensio, “Transitivity-Based Foregrounding in the Acts of the Apostles: A Functional-Grammatical Approach to the Lukan Perspective”

2000 | pages: 201 | ISBN: 1841271640 | PDF | 10,4 mb

This study of the language of Acts is based on M. A. K. Halliday’s functional grammar, which offers a theory based on linguistic choices and the effects they have on readers or hearers. Interacting with selected interpretations from, among others, C.K. Barrett, Ben C. Witherington, Jerome Neyrey, Jacob Jervell and John Lentz, Martín-Asensio argues that transitivity (‘who does what to whom’) emerges as a key factor in the foregrounding scheme of Acts, and this analysis offers a linguistically based perspective on Luke’s overall concern to underline the supremacy of the divine will on the stage of human affairs.

Francis Gerald Downing, “Making Sense in (and of) the First Christian Century”

2000 | pages: 275 | ISBN: 1841271241 | PDF | 13,5 mb

The first Christian century must be approached with careful attention to its cultural and linguistic heterogeneity. It should not simply be assumed that this past ‘is a different place, they do things differently there’. Downing treats the ways in which early Christians tried to ‘make things make sense’ within their cultures, noting both the similarities and differences between their ways and contemporary ones and stressing the variety of contexts and influences on first-century communication. Downing brings his renowned expertise to bear in illuminating the cultural features of early Christian society with a range of fascinating and telling examples.

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