Dharma Moments

Religion related

Brian H. Cosby, “John Flavel: Puritan Life and Thought in Stuart England”
Danai Chanchaochai, “Dharma Moments”
Amyn B. Sajoo, “Muslim Ethics: Emerging Vistas”
Christian Smith, “Christian America? What Evangelicals Really Want”
Shahram Akbarzadeh, Benjamin MacQueen, “Islam and Human Rights in Practice: Perspectives Across the Ummah”

Brian H. Cosby, “John Flavel: Puritan Life and Thought in Stuart England”

English | 2013 | ISBN: 0739179527 | PDF | pages: 170 | 28.2 mb

A nonconformist, unifier, husband of three deceased wives, victim of religious persecution, and author of what has been collected into six volumes of reprinted Works, John Flavel (c.1630-1691) of Dartmouth, England not only had an immense following during his own lifetime, but deeply influenced those who would set the course as shapers of religion and culture in the generations to follow: Matthew Henry, Increase Mather, John Newton, Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, William Wilberforce, Archibald Alexander, and Charles Spurgeon. Flavel’s influence remained strong until the end of the nineteenth century, when—for various reasons presented in this study seek to show—historiographical, philosophical, and Christian literature ceased to recognize his life or thought. It has only been within the last decade that scholarly work has begun to uncover this ‘lost’ Puritan and see him as a significant resource for understanding life and thought in Stuart England as well as the religious life of the early American colonies. The first book of its kind, John Flavel:Puritan Life and Thought in Stuart England aims to reveal Flavel as both a significant and influential English Puritan as well as present the salient elements of his life and thought.

Danai Chanchaochai, “Dharma Moments”

English | 2006 | ISBN: 1857883853 | PDF | pages: 249 | 0.9 mb

At home and at work, we struggle every day with hope and fear- living in the past, anxious about the future. Is there an end to suffering? Dharma Moments captures the essence of Buddhist practice to help us thrive in the modern world. With sound advice about its relevance in today’s busy world, Dharma Moments places the wisdom of the Dharma at the center of our lives, examining both personal and global challenges. This wide-ranging collection of deeply personal insights and real-life stories reveals the Buddha’s most enduring principles. More than forty anecdotes and personal stories illustrate how Buddhist teachings can help us break free from the trappings of materialism; loosen the bonds of anger and envy; triumph over discontent and depression; and make every moment a Dharma moment.

Amyn B. Sajoo, “Muslim Ethics: Emerging Vistas”

2004 | pages: 186 | ISBN: 1850435502 | PDF | 2,6 mb

Recent political and social events as well as advances in science and technology have posed challenges to the traditional Muslim discourse on ethics. In this latest in the series of Occasional Papers produced by the Institute of Ismaili Studies, Amyn B. Sajoo examines these challenges, and through a critical analysis of the implications of emerging initiatives in political pluralism and civic culture, in bio-medicine and environmental conservatism, considers how the contours of public ethics in Islam may be redefined to provide shared conceptions of the good in pluralist societies.

Christian Smith, “Christian America? What Evangelicals Really Want”

English | 2000 | ISBN: 0520220412 | PDF | pages: 274 | 1.6 mb

In recent decades Protestant evangelicalism has become a conspicuous and–to many Americans, worrisome–part of this country’s cultural and political landscape. But just how unified is the supposed constituency of the Christian Coalition? And who exactly are the people the Christian Right claims to represent? In the most extensive study of American evangelicals ever conducted, Christian Smith explores the beliefs, values, commitments, and goals of the ordinary men and women who make up this often misunderstood religious group. The result is a much-needed contribution to the discussion of issues surrounding fundamental American freedoms and the basic identity of the United States as a pluralistic nation.
Based on data from a three-year national study, including more than 200 in-depth interviews of evangelicals around the country, Christian America? assesses the common stereotype of evangelicals as intolerant, right-wing, religious zealots seeking to impose a Christian moral order through political force. What Smith finds instead are people vastly more diverse and ambivalent than this stereotype suggests. On issues such as religion in education, “family values,” Christian political activism, and tolerance of other religions and moralities, evangelicals are highly disparate and conflicted. As the voices of interviewees make clear, the labels “conservative” and “liberal” are too simplistic for understanding their approaches to public life and political action.

Shahram Akbarzadeh, Benjamin MacQueen, “Islam and Human Rights in Practice: Perspectives Across the Ummah”

2008 | pages: 189 | ISBN: 0415449596 | PDF | 1,3 mb

Questions over the compatibility of Islam and Human Rights have become a key area of debate in the perceived tensions between ‘Islam and the West’. In many ways, discussion over the stance of Islam in relation to such factors as gender rights, religious freedom, social and political freedoms, and other related issues represents a microcosm of the broader experience of how Muslim and ‘Western’ communities interact and relate.
This volume seeks to engage with the various debates surrounding Islam and Human Rights, in particular, challenging assumptions of a ‘standard’ or ‘essential’ Muslim perspective on Human Rights. Through a survey of the experiences of Muslim communities across the globe (the ummah), this volume highlights the dynamic way Muslims understand and incorporate Human Rights into their personal, social and political experiences.
From conceptual discussions on the issues of gender rights and religious freedom, to examining Muslim communities from South East Asia, Central Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, leading global experts bring forth key insights into the way in which Muslim communities live and experience Human Rights. The potential for deeper engagement with this issue is critical, as it opens possibilities for more profound understanding and tolerance.

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