Arise The Dead II World War Two (Miroland)

Biographies

Arise The Dead II: World War Two (Miroland) by Elizabeth Langridge
Arise the Dead I: The Great War (MiroLand) by Elizabeth Langridge
Better Than New: Lessons I’ve Learned from Saving Old Homes (and How They Saved Me) by Nicole Curtis
Consequence: A Memoir
My Foreign Cities: A Memoir by Elizabeth Scarboro

Arise The Dead II: World War Two (Miroland) by Elizabeth Langridge

English | March 1st, 2018 | ASIN: B07CJPMBQ6, ISBN: 1771832843 | 275 Pages | EPUB | 3.84 MB

Told in two volumes, Arise the Dead–part memoir, part historical fiction–spans the period between 1914 and 1945. The two books concentrate on the lives of real people–the author’s parents, the author, a young pilot from New Jersey in WW1, and others–as well as some fictional characters, all of whom lived through one or both of the wars and were profoundly affected personally by them.
Arise the Dead II focuses on the Second World War and how the war affected the author’s family living just outside of London and in the path of the German bombing missions. It tells the story of how the author’s parents coped when their Sussex village home was bombed and destroyed on November 11, 1940.

Arise the Dead I: The Great War (MiroLand) by Elizabeth Langridge

English | March 1st, 2018 | ASIN: B07CK51K81, ISBN: 1771832819 | 275 Pages | EPUB | 7.96 MB

Told in two volumes, Arise the Dead–part memoir, part historical fiction–spans the period between 1914 and 1945. The two books concentrate on the lives of real people–the author’s parents, the author, a young pilot from New Jersey in WW1, and others–as well as some fictional characters, all of whom lived through one or both of the wars and were profoundly affected personally by them.
Arise the Dead I, told mainly from the viewpoint of the author’s father, focuses on the First World War, specifically the Battle of Loos in northern France (September 1915) where the author’s father fought with the 8th Battalion of the Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment and where he was wounded.

Better Than New: Lessons I’ve Learned from Saving Old Homes (and How They Saved Me) by Nicole Curtis

English | October 18, 2016 | ISBN: 1579656676, ASIN: B01BCW9CWG | AZW3 | 224 pages | 9.2 MB

A New York Times and USA Today Bestseller
For the first time, Nicole Curtis, the star of the megahit HGTV and DIY Network show Rehab Addict, reveals her private struggles, her personal victories, and the inspiring lessons we can all learn from them.
Part celebrity memoir and part self-help book, Better Than New goes behind the scenes with an entrepreneurial single mom who worked her way from waitress/real estate agent to home renovation expert, preservationist, and television star. With eight chapters in the book—eight lessons told through her life story and through several of the homes she has remodeled—readers will get to see another side of Nicole Curtis, including the private and personal struggles that are not seen on TV. Working in Detroit and Minneapolis, Curtis has opened her fans’ eyes to the beauty of older homes and the value of reclaiming and reusing authentic original materials rather than sending dumpster loads to the local landfill. Curtis applies the same principles to her personal life—valuing old friends, rescuing dogs, and advocating for the wounded, the elderly, and the disadvantaged. Readers will find inspiration to apply to their own lives supplemented with never-before-seen photos of Curtis and the homes she renovates. Better Than New is a visual treat, packed with more than 75 color photographs from Curtis’s personal collection, ranging from family photos to before-and-after photos of the rehabbed homes’ interiors and exteriors.

Consequence: A Memoir

English | April 5, 2016 | ISBN: 1627795138, 1250118425 | EPUB | 256 Pages | 1.1 MB

A man questions everything-his faith, his morality, his country-as he recounts his experience as an interrogator in Iraq; an unprecedented memoir and “an act of incredible bravery” (Phil Klay)
“Remarkable… Both an agonized confession and a chilling expose of one of the darkest interludes of the War on Terror. Only this kind of courage and honesty can bring America back to the democratic values that we are so rightfully proud of.” -Sebastian Junger
Consequence is the story of Eric Fair, a kid who grew up in the shadows of crumbling Bethlehem Steel plants nurturing a strong faith and a belief that he was called to serve his country. It is a story of a man who chases his own demons from Egypt, where he served as an Army translator, to a detention center in Iraq, to seminary at Princeton, and eventually, to a heart transplant ward at the University of Pennsylvania.
In 2004, after several months as an interrogator with a private contractor in Iraq, Eric Fair’s nightmares take new forms: first, there had been the shrinking dreams; now the liquid dreams begin. By the time he leaves Iraq after that first deployment (he will return), Fair will have participated in or witnessed a variety of aggressive interrogation techniques including sleep deprivation, stress positions, diet manipulation, exposure, and isolation. Years later, his health and marriage crumbling, haunted by the role he played in what we now know as “enhanced interrogation,” it is Fair’s desire to speak out that becomes a key to his survival. Spare and haunting, Eric Fair’s memoir is both a brave, unrelenting confession and a book that questions the very depths of who he, and we as a country, have become.

My Foreign Cities: A Memoir by Elizabeth Scarboro

English | April 1st, 2013 | ASIN: B00AR354VK, ISBN: 0871403382, 0871407396 | 299 Pages | EPUB | 0.84 MB

When she was just seventeen, independent and ambitious Elizabeth Scarboro fell in love with irreverent and irresistible Stephen. She knew he had cystic fibrosis, that he was expected to live only until the age of thirty or so, and that soon she’d have a choice to make.
She could set out to travel, date, and lead the adventurous life she’d imagined, or she could be with Stephen, who came with an urgency of his own. In choosing him, Scarboro embraced another kind of adventure—simultaneously joyous and heartrending—staying with Stephen and building a life in the ten years they’d have together. The illness would be present in the background of their lives and then ever-more-insistently in the foreground.
Beyond the illness, though, is a breathtaking love story. In crystalline prose, Scarboro describes the pulse of her relationship with Stephen with all its illuminating quirks. Like any young couple, they agonize about career choices, attempt ill-fated road trips, bargain about whether to adopt a puppy, and host one memorably disastrous Thanksgiving. They navigate the growing pains of their twenties alongside the twists and turns of life-threatening disease; if their telephone rings at midnight, the caller might be a heartbroken friend, or the hospital offering a new set of lungs. As time goes on and trouble looms, the dangers of Stephen’s illness consume her, just as they will consume readers who feel they have come to know this extraordinary couple.
Scarboro tells her story of fierce love and its limitations with humor, grace, and remarkable bravery. My Foreign Cities is a portrait of a young couple approaching mortality with reckless abandon, gleefully outrunning it for as long as they can.