Research on Translator and Interpreter Training

1. Research on Translator and Interpreter Training

This book comprehensively examines the development of translator and interpreter training using bibliometric reviews of the state of the field and empirical studies on classroom practice. It starts by introducing databases in bibliometric reviews and presents a detailed account of the reasons behind the project and its objectives as well as a description of the methods of constructing databases.
The introduction is followed by full-scale review studies on various aspects of translator and interpreter training, providing not only an overall picture of the research themes and methods, but also valuable information on active authors, institutions and countries in the subfields of translator training, interpreter training, and translator and interpreter training in general. The book also compares publications from different subfields of research, regions and journals to show the special features within this discipline. Further, it provides a series of empirical studies conducted by the authors, covering a wide array of topics in translator and interpreter training, with an emphasis on learner factors.
This collective volume, with its unique perspective on bibliometric data and empirical studies, highlights the latest development in the field of translator and interpreter training research. The findings presented will help researchers, trainers and practitioners to reflect on the important issues in the discipline and find possible new directions for future research.

2. Interpreter Education in the Digital Age: Innovation, Access, and Change (The Interpreter Education Series)

This collection brings togethe innovative research and approaches for blended learning using digital technology in interpreter education for signed and spoken languages. Volume editors Suzanne Ehrlich and Jemina Napier call upon the expertise of 21 experts, including themselves, to report on the current technology used to provide digital enhancements to interpreter education in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Belgium, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Divided into three parts, Innovation, Change, and Community Engagement, this study focuses on the technology itself, rather than how technology enhances curriculum, delivery, or resources.

Initiatives described in this collection range from the implementation of on-demand interpreting using iPad technology to create personalized, small-group, multidimensional models suited to digital media for 160 languages; introducing students to interpreting in a 3D world through an IVY virtual environment; applying gaming principles to interpreter education; assessing the amenability of the digital pen in the hybrid mode of interpreting; developing multimedia content for both open access and structured interpreter education environments; to preparing interpreting students for interactions in social media forums, and more. Interpreter Education in the Digital Age provides a context for the application of technologies in interpreter education from an international viewpoint across languages and modalities.

3. Translating Cultures: An Introduction for Translators, Interpreters and Mediators, 2nd Edition

As the 21st century gets into stride so does the call for a discipline combining culture and translation. This second edition of Translating Cultures retains its original aim of putting some rigour and coherence into these fashionable words and lays the foundation for such a discipline. This edition has not only been thoroughly revised, but it has also been expanded. In particular, a new chapter has been added which focuses specifically on training translators for translational and intercultural competencies.

The core of the book provides a model for teaching culture to translators, interpreters and other mediators. It introduces the reader to current understanding about culture and aims to raise awareness of the fundamental role of culture in constructing, perceiving and translating reality. Culture is perceived throughout as a system for orienting experience, and a basic presupposition is that the organization of experience is not ‘reality’, but rather a simplified model and a ‘distortion’ which varies from culture to culture. Each culture acts as a frame within which external signs or ‘reality’ are interpreted. The approach is interdisciplinary, taking ideas from contemporary translation theory, anthropology, Bateson’s logical typing and metamessage theories, Bandler and Grinder’s NLP meta-model theory, and Hallidayan functional grammar.

Authentic texts and translations are offered to illustrate the various strategies that a cultural mediator can adopt in order to make the different cultural frames he or she is mediating between more explicit.

4. Play as Symbol of the World: And Other Writings

Eugen Fink is considered one of the clearest interpreters of phenomenology and was the preferred conversational partner of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. In Play as Symbol of the World, Fink offers an original phenomenology of play as he attempts to understand the world through the experience of play. He affirms the philosophical significance of play, why it is more than idle amusement, and reflects on the movement from “child’s play” to “cosmic play.” Well-known for its nontechnical, literary style, this skillful translation by Ian Alexander Moore and Christopher Turner invites engagement with Fink’s philosophy of play and related writings on sports, festivals, and ancient cult practices.

5. Speak English or What?: Codeswitching and Interpreter Use in New York City Courts

This book presents a study of interpreter-mediated interaction in New York City small claims courts, drawing on audio-recorded arbitration hearings and ethnographic fieldwork. Focusing on the language use of speakers of Haitian Creole, Polish, Russian, or Spanish, the study explores how these litigants make use of their limited proficiency in English, in addition to communicating with the help of professional court interpreters. Drawing on research on courtroom interaction, legal interpreting, and conversational codeswitching, the study explores how the ability of immigrant litigants to participate in these hearings is impacted by institutional language practices and underlying language ideologies, as well as by the approaches of individual arbitrators and interpreters who vary in their willingness to accommodate to litigants and share the burden of communication with them. Litigants are shown to codeswitch between the languages in interactionally meaningful ways that facilitate communication, but such bilingual practices are found to be in conflict with court policies that habitually discourage the use of English and require litigants to act as monolinguals, using only one language throughout the entire proceedings. Moreover, the standard distribution of interpreting modes in the courtroom is shown to disadvantage litigants who rely on the interpreter, as consecutive interpreting causes their narrative testimony to be less coherent and more prone to interruptions, while simultaneous interpreting often leads to incomplete translation of legal arguments or of their opponent’s testimony. Consequently, the study raises questions about the relationship between linguistic diversity and inequality, arguing that the legal system inherently privileges speakers of English.