More Than Happiness Buddhist and Stoic Wisdom for a Sceptical Age

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More Than Happiness: Buddhist and Stoic Wisdom for a Sceptical Age by Antonia Macaro
The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats by David Stephen Calonne
Ramana Maharshi: The Crown Jewel of Advaita by John Allen Grimes
Two Saints: Speculations Around and About Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and Ramana Maharishi by Arun Shourie
Ruth Henderson, “Second Temple Songs of Zion”

More Than Happiness: Buddhist and Stoic Wisdom for a Sceptical Age by Antonia Macaro

English | January 4th, 2018 | ASIN: B076PMG5JB, ISBN: 1785781332 | 208 pages | EPUB | 1.28 MB

Do you consider yourself stoical? Do a bit of meditation or mindfulness practice? Buddhism and Stoicism have a lot to offer modern readers seeking the good life, but they’re also radical systems that ask much of their followers. In More than Happiness, Antonia Macaro delves into both philosophies, focusing on the elements that fit with our sceptical age, and those which have the potential to make the biggest impact on how we live.
From accepting that some things are beyond our control, to monitoring our emotions for unhealthy reactions, to shedding attachment to material things, there is much, she argues, that we can take and much that we’d do better to leave behind.
In this synthesis of ancient wisdom, Macaro reframes the ‘good life’, and gets us to see the world as it really is and to question the value of the things we desire. The goal is more than happiness: living ethically and placing value on the right things in life.

The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats by David Stephen Calonne

English | September 25, 2017 | ISBN: 1108416454 | PDF | 244 pages | 22.4 MB

The Spiritual Imagination of the Beats is the first comprehensive study to explore the role of esoteric, occult, alchemical, shamanistic, mystical and magical traditions in the work of eleven major Beat authors. The opening chapter discusses Kenneth Rexroth and Robert Duncan as predecessors and important influences on the spiritual orientation of the Beats. David Stephen Calonne draws comparisons throughout the book between various approaches individual Beat writers took regarding sacred experience – for example, Burroughs had significant objections to Buddhist philosophy, while Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac both devoted considerable time to studying Buddhist history and texts.
This book also focuses on authors who have traditionally been neglected in Beat Studies – Diane di Prima, Bob Kaufman, Philip Lamantia and Philip Whalen. In addition, several understudied work such as Gregory Corso’s ‘The Geometric Poem’ – inspired by Corso’s deep engagement with ancient Egyptian thought – are given close attention. Calonne introduces important themes from the history of heterodoxy – from Gnosticism, Manicheanism and Ismailism to Theosophy and Tarot – and demonstrates how inextricably these ideas shaped the Beat literary imagination.

Ramana Maharshi: The Crown Jewel of Advaita by John Allen Grimes

English | November 17th, 2015 | ASIN: B0184ZQAII, ISBN: 0615632688 | 272 pages | EPUB | 0.37 MB

The great 20th century Indian sage, Ramana Maharshi, has often been described as the very incarnation of non-dualism, or advaita, even though the Hindu philosophical school of Advaita Vedanta claims that no one has ever been born, lived or died. It is this paradox that the Advaitin philosopher John Allen Grimes explores in this profound new work, skillfully combining biography with philosophical and spiritual inquiry.
For, as he tells us in his introduction, as one passes Ramana’s life and teachings before the lens of Advaita, both are seen to be in perfect accord with the essence of Advaitin philosophy. But what is astonishing about this fact is that Ramana’s teachings seem to have emerged spontaneously, as the fruit of his own sudden ‘Awakening’ at 16 years old; for it was only after this experience, almost by accident, that he learned of the ancient Hindu teachings of non-dualism! Ramana Maharshi: The Crown Jewel of Advaita reintroduces us to the life and teachings of the sage Ramana Maharshi through the darsana or ‘philosophical system’ known as Advaita Vedanta. But, as the Sanskrit word darsan also means ‘being in the presence’ of a sage or deity, we should not be surprised to find that this is something that this book also manages to accomplish.

Two Saints: Speculations Around and About Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and Ramana Maharishi by Arun Shourie

English | May 10, 2017 | ISBN: 9352645049 | EPUB | 496 pages | 1.1 MB

The life of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa ‘enables us to see God face to face’, Gandhiji wrote. Similarly, when someone in his circle was distraught, the Mahatma sent him to spend time at the Ashram of Ramana Maharshi. The Paramahamsa and the Maharshi have been among the greatest spiritual figures of our country. They have transformed the lives of and have been a solace to millions. Their peak, mystic experience is what we yearn to have. But what if several of the experiences they had occur in other circumstances also?
With the rigour and painstaking research that mark all his work, Shourie probes the lives of two of India’s greatest spiritual masters in the light of the breath-taking advances in neuroscience as well as psychology and sociology. The result is a book of remarkable vigour: an examination – and ultimately reconciliation – of science and faith as also of seemingly antagonistic, irreconcilable worldviews.
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Ruth Henderson, “Second Temple Songs of Zion”

English | 2014 | ISBN: 3110315645 | PDF | pages: 361 | 4.9 mb

“Although in Second Temple literature we find a variety of songs concerned with the future of Jerusalem, little attempt has been made to analyse these comparatively as a generic group. In this study, three songs have been selected on the basis of their similarity in style, ideas and their apparent original composition in Hebrew. The texts have been subjected to a literary analysis both individually and then comparatively”

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