Migration between Africa and Europe

Politics, Sociology

Migration between Africa and Europe By Cris Beauchemin
Middle Powers in Global Governance: The Rise of Turkey by Emel Parlar Dal
Becoming Citizens in a Changing World: IEA International Civic and Citizenship Education Study 2016 International Report By Wolfram Schulz
Benoit Godin, Dominique Vinck, “Critical Studies of Innovation: Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias”
Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America by Kathleen Belew

Migration between Africa and Europe By Cris Beauchemin

English | PDF,EPUB | 2018 | 452 Pages | ISBN : 3319695681 | 13.92 MB

This volume examines migration between Africa and Europe, rather than just from Africa to Europe. Based on a unique socio-demographic survey carried out both in origin and destination countries (MAFE survey), it argues that return migration, circulation, and transnational practices are significant. Policy design must also take these factors into account.
Comparing in a systematic way three flows of African migrants (from Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana and Senegal), this study offers a new view on the patterns, determinants, and family and economic effects of migration. By comparing six European countries (Belgium, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK), it shows that the dynamics of migration differ greatly in new vs. old destination countries.
Based on a statistical analysis of life histories, this study provides a dynamic view of migration that will help readers better understand current trends as well as future trajectories. It will appeal to researchers, academics, practitioners, and others interested in taking a deeper look in (im)migration issues.

Middle Powers in Global Governance: The Rise of Turkey by Emel Parlar Dal

English | PDF,EPUB | 2018 | 280 Pages | ISBN : 3319723642 | 4.48 MB

This volume summarizes, synthesizes, updates, and contextualizes Turkey’s multiple roles in global governance. As a result of various political, economic, cultural and technological changes occurring in the international system, the need for an effective and appropriate global governance is unfolding. In such an environment, Turkey’s and other rising/middle powers’ initiatives appear to be indispensable for rendering the existing global governance mechanisms more functional and effective. The authors contribute to the assessment of changing global governance practices of secondary and/or middle power states with a special focus on Turkey’s multiple roles and issue-based global governance policies.

Becoming Citizens in a Changing World: IEA International Civic and Citizenship Education Study 2016 International Report By Wolfram Schulz

English | PDF | 2018 | 261 Pages | ISBN : 331973962X | 7.94 MB

This book presents the results from the second cycle of the IEA International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS 2016). Using data from 24 countries in Asia, Europe and Latin America, the study investigates the ways in which young people are prepared to undertake their roles as citizens in a range of countries in the second decade of the 21st century. It also responds to the enduring and emerging challenges of educating young people in a world where contexts of democracy and civic participation continue to change.
New developments of this kind include the increase in the use of social media by young people as a tool for civic engagement, growing concerns about global threats and sustainable development, as well as the role of schools in fostering peaceful ways of interaction between young people. Besides enabling the evaluation of a wide range of aspects of civic and citizenship education, including those related to recent developments in a number of countries, the inclusion of test and questionnaire material from the first cycle of the study in 2009 allows the results from ICCS 2016 to be used to examine changes in civic knowledge, attitudes and engagement over seven years.

Benoit Godin, Dominique Vinck, “Critical Studies of Innovation: Alternative Approaches to the Pro-Innovation Bias”

2017 | ISBN-10: 1785366963 | 352 pages | PDF | 4 MB

Different theories, models and narratives of innovation compete for both legitimacy and authority. However, despite the variations, they all offer a consistent pro-innovation bias, dismissing resistance as irrational, and overlooking the value of non-users and collateral impacts. This book asks, what has been left out? It offers a reflexive view and invites researchers to consider new avenues of research, through a critique of current representations of innovation. The chapters provide a different viewpoint on innovation by exploring what has been omitted from traditional innovation studies. The book examines imitation, non-innovative roles, resistance to innovation, slow innovation, the rationale of non-users, failure, withdrawal, collateral impacts and alternative models. Calling for new definitions and frameworks, the editors have created a critical program for innovation studies with new avenues for future research. Offering state-of-the-art discussion of theories, models, narratives and ideologies of innovation and alternative approaches, this book will be an essential resource for scholars in technology and innovation, management, engineering, political and social sciences. It will also appeal to policy-makers in the science and technology sector.

Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America by Kathleen Belew

English | April 9, 2018 | ISBN: 0674286073 | PDF | 352 pages | 28.9 MB

“Belew’s book helps explain how we got to today’s alt right.” ―Terry Gross, Fresh Air
“Bring the War Home is a tour de force. An utterly engrossing and piercingly argued history that tracks how the seismic aftershocks of the Vietnam War gave rise to a white power movement whose toxic admixture of violent bigotry, antigovernmental hostility, and racial terrorism helped set the stage for Waco, the Oklahoma City bombing, and, yes, the presidency of Donald Trump.” ―Junot Díaz
The white power movement in America wants a revolution. It has declared all-out war against the federal government and its agents, and has carried out―with military precision―an escalating campaign of terror against the American public. Its soldiers are not lone wolves but are highly organized cadres motivated by a coherent and deeply troubling worldview of white supremacy, anticommunism, and apocalypse. In Bring the War Home, Kathleen Belew gives us the first full history of the movement that consolidated in the 1970s and 1980s around a potent sense of betrayal in the Vietnam War and made tragic headlines in the 1995 bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building.
Returning to an America ripped apart by a war that, in their view, they were not allowed to win, a small but driven group of veterans, active-duty personnel, and civilian supporters concluded that waging war on their own country was justified. They unified people from a variety of militant groups, including Klansmen, neo-Nazis, skinheads, radical tax protestors, and white separatists. The white power movement operated with discipline and clarity, undertaking assassinations, mercenary soldiering, armed robbery, counterfeiting, and weapons trafficking. Its command structure gave women a prominent place in brokering intergroup alliances and giving birth to future recruits.
Belew’s disturbing history reveals how war cannot be contained in time and space. In its wake, grievances intensify and violence becomes a logical course of action for some. Bring the War Home argues for awareness of the heightened potential for paramilitarism in a present defined by ongoing war.