Machiavelli A Very Short Introduction

Biographies

Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction by Quentin Skinner
Ancestral Passions: The Leakey Family and the Quest for Humankind’s Beginnings by Virginia Morell
Song in a Weary Throat: Memoir of an American Pilgrimage by Pauli Murray
Sounds from Silence: Graeme Clark and the Bionic Ear Story by Graeme M. Clark
History and Silence: Purge and Rehabilitation of Memory in Late Antiquity by Charles W. Jr. Hedrick

Machiavelli: A Very Short Introduction by Quentin Skinner

English | January 18, 2001 | ISBN: 0192854070 | EPUB | 120 pages | 2.5 MB

Niccolo Machiavelli taught that political leaders must be prepared to do evil that good may come of it, and his name has been a byword ever since for duplicity and immorality. Is his sinister reputation deserved? In answering this question Quentin Skinner focuses on three major works, The Prince, the Discourses, and The History of Florence, and distils from them an introduction to Machiavelli’s doctrines of exemplary clarity.

Ancestral Passions: The Leakey Family and the Quest for Humankind’s Beginnings by Virginia Morell

English | January 11, 2011 (1995) | ISBN: 0684801922, 0684824701 | EPUB | 640 pages | 5 MB

This biography of the “First Family” of anthropology reveals how their discoveries, collaborations, and rivalries contributed to our own knowledge of the origins of humankind.
In this fascinating and authoritative work, acclaimed science writer Virginia Morell brings to vivid life the famous and infamous Leakey family, pioneers in the field of paleoanthropology: Louis Leakey, the patriarch, who persisted through initial scientific failures and scandal-ridden divorce to achieve spectacular success in digs throughout East Africa; Mary, his second wife, who worked alongside Louis as they made their outstanding discoveries at Olduvai Gorge and elsewhere; and Richard, their son, who ascended to the top of the field in his parents’ wake, only to be threatened with both near-fatal illness and fierce professional rivalry. Morell transports us into the world of these compelling personalities, demonstrating how a small clan of highly talented and fiercely competitive people came to dominate an entire field of science and to contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the origins of humanity.

Song in a Weary Throat: Memoir of an American Pilgrimage by Pauli Murray

English | May 9th, 2018 | ASIN: B076MD9JW3, ISBN: 1631494589 | 624 Pages | EPUB | 33.56 MB

A prophetic memoir by the activist who “articulated the intellectual foundations” (The New Yorker) of the civil rights and women’s rights movements.
First published posthumously in 1987, Pauli Murray’s Song in a Weary Throat was critically lauded, winning the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Lillian Smith Book Award among other distinctions. Yet Murray’s name and extraordinary influence receded from view in the intervening years; now they are once again entering the public discourse. At last, with the republication of this “beautifully crafted” memoir, Song in a Weary Throat takes its rightful place among the great civil rights autobiographies of the twentieth century.
In a voice that is energetic, wry, and direct, Murray tells of a childhood dramatically altered by the sudden loss of her spirited, hard-working parents. Orphaned at age four, she was sent from Baltimore to segregated Durham, North Carolina, to live with her unflappable Aunt Pauline, who, while strict, was liberal-minded in accepting the tomboy Pauli as “my little boy-girl.” In fact, throughout her life, Murray would struggle with feelings of sexual “in-betweenness”—she tried unsuccessfully to get her doctors to give her testosterone—that today we would recognize as a transgendered identity.
We then follow Murray north at the age of seventeen to New York City’s Hunter College, to her embrace of Gandhi’s Satyagraha—nonviolent resistance—and south again, where she experienced Jim Crow firsthand. An early Freedom Rider, she was arrested in 1940, fifteen years before Rosa Parks’ disobedience, for sitting in the whites-only section of a Virginia bus. Murray’s activism led to relationships with Thurgood Marshall and Eleanor Roosevelt—who respectfully referred to Murray as a “firebrand”—and propelled her to a Howard University law degree and a lifelong fight against “Jane Crow” sexism. We also read Betty Friedan’s enthusiastic response to Murray’s call for an NAACP for Women—the origins of NOW. Murray sets these thrilling high-water marks against the backdrop of uncertain finances, chronic fatigue, and tragic losses both private and public, as Patricia Bell-Scott’s engaging introduction brings to life.
Now, more than thirty years after her death in 1985, Murray—poet, memoirist, lawyer, activist, and Episcopal priest—gains long-deserved recognition through a rediscovered memoir that serves as a “powerful witness” (Brittney Cooper) to a pivotal era in the American twentieth century.

Sounds from Silence: Graeme Clark and the Bionic Ear Story by Graeme M. Clark

English | 1 Oct. 2000 | ISBN: 186508302X | 248 Pages | PDF | 1.14 MB

‘In those early weeks post op, he had been aware of sound but not of speech. We were sitting in the sofa having a lesson, practising ‘a’ when suddenly it came out loud and clear. Then, hardly daring, I said ‘i’. He followed very softly. I went on: ‘e’, ‘o’, u’, and each time Teddy followed. I felt awed, so filled with emotion I couldn’t speak. Teddy was shining, as if a light had been switched on. Then, very slowly, he leaned over and kissed me very gently on the mouth. That kiss belongs to you.’ A letter from a grateful grandmother after Graeme Clark restored her grandson’s hearing.Sounds From Silence is the very personal story of how Professor Graeme Clark developed the Bionic Ear, how he conceived and directed research and how Cochlear took it up to give so many people, both young and old, the chance to hear. It movingly tells of how the profoundly deaf and their families cope with the silence of deafness, and of their joy in being given the gift of hearing.However, Graeme Clark also reveals the often seemingly insurmountable barriers put in his way: the mistrust of sections of the deaf community, the scepticism of many of his professional colleagues and the constant frustration in trying to find funding for his research. This is a powerful and moving story of one man’s professional and personal journey to give sounds from silence.

History and Silence: Purge and Rehabilitation of Memory in Late Antiquity by Charles W. Jr. Hedrick

English | 1 Aug. 2010 | ISBN: 029271873X | 366 Pages | PDF | 2.12 MB

The ruling elite in ancient Rome sought to eradicate even the memory of their deceased opponents through a process now known as damnatio memoriae. These formal and traditional practices included removing the person’s name and image from public monuments and inscriptions, making it illegal to speak of him, and forbidding funeral observances and mourning. Paradoxically, however, while these practices dishonored the person’s memory, they did not destroy it. Indeed, a later turn of events could restore the offender not only to public favor but also to re-inclusion in the public record.
This book examines the process of purge and rehabilitation of memory in the person of Virius Nicomachus Flavianus(?-394). Charles Hedrick describes how Flavian was condemned for participating in the rebellion against the Christian emperor Theodosius the Great―and then restored to the public record a generation later as members of the newly Christianized senatorial class sought to reconcile their pagan past and Christian present. By selectively remembering and forgetting the actions of Flavian, Hedrick asserts, the Roman elite honored their ancestors while participating in profound social, cultural, and religious change.