Great Expectations The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens

Biographies

A Doctor’s Sword :
How an Irish Doctor Survived War, Captivity and the Atomic Bomb
Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens by Robert Gottlieb
Cast in Deathless Bronze : Andrew Rowan,
the Spanish-American War, and the Origins of American Empire
Comrade Haldane Is Too Busy to Go on Holiday: The Genius Who Spied for Stalin by Gavan Tredoux
What Would Dolly Do?: How to Be a Diamond in a Rhinestone World by Lauren Marino

A Doctor’s Sword :
How an Irish Doctor Survived War, Captivity and the Atomic Bomb

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1848893205 | 293 Pages | PDF | 55 MB

“There followed a blue flash accompanied by a ver y bright magnesium-type flare … Then came a frighteningly loud but rather flat explosion, which was followed by a blast of hot air … All this was followed by eerie silence.”
This was doctor Aidan MacCarthy’s description of the atomic bomb explosion above Nagasaki in August 1945, just over a mile from where he was trembling in a makeshift bomb shelter in the Mitsubishi POW camp.
This is the story of the incredible life of Dr. Aidan MacCarthy (1913-95) the only person to have survived the two events that mark the beginning and end of the Second World War. He was evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk after three days of relentless attacks in May 1940, and he was trembling in a makeshift bomb shelter in the center of Nagasaki when the atomic bomb destroyed the city in August 1945. In the intervening years, he survived burning planes, sinking ships, jungle warfare, starvation, disease, captivity, and slave labor. In the devastation of the atomic bomb, he was the first non-Japanese doctor to assist civilians. The book also follows the search by MacCarthy’s daughter to find the family of the Japanese officer who surrendered his samurai sword to him, a treasured relic she owns to this day. It is a story of survival, forgiveness, and humanity at its most admirable.

Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens by Robert Gottlieb

English | November 27th, 2012 | ASIN: B008MWL9IK, ISBN: 0374298807, 1250039460 | 256 Pages | EPUB | 6.34 MB

The strange and varied lives of the ten children of the world’s most beloved novelist
Charles Dickens, famous for the indelible child characters he created—from Little Nell to Oliver Twist and David Copperfield—was also the father of ten children (and a possible eleventh). What happened to those children is the fascinating subject of Robert Gottlieb’s Great Expectations. With sympathy and understanding he narrates the highly various and surprising stories of each of Dickens’s sons and daughters, from Kate, who became a successful artist, to Frank, who died in Moline, Illinois, after serving a grim stretch in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Each of these lives is fascinating on its own. Together they comprise a unique window on Victorian England as well as a moving and disturbing study of Dickens as a father and as a man.

Cast in Deathless Bronze : Andrew Rowan,
the Spanish-American War, and the Origins of American Empire

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1943665435 | 385 Pages | PDF | 27 MB

In 1898, when war with Spain seemed inevitable, Andrew Summers Rowan, an American army lieutenant from West Virginia, was sent on a secret mission to Cuba. He was to meet with General Calixto Garcia, a leader of the Cuban rebels, in order to gather information for a U.S. invasion. Months later, after the war was fought and won, a flamboyant entrepreneur named Elbert Hubbard wrote an account of Rowan’s mission titled “A Message to Garcia.” It sold millions of copies, and Rowan became the equivalent of a modern-day rock star. His fame resulted in hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles, radio shows, and two movies. Even today he is held up as an exemplar of bravery and loyalty. The problem is that nothing Hubbard wrote about Rowan was true.
Donald Tunnicliff Rice reveals the facts behind the story of “A Message to Garcia” while using Rowan’s biography as a window into the history of the Spanish-American War, the Philippine War, and the Moro Rebellion. The result is a compellingly written narrative containing many details never before published in any form, and also an accessible perspective on American diplomatic and military history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Comrade Haldane Is Too Busy to Go on Holiday: The Genius Who Spied for Stalin by Gavan Tredoux

English | April 24th, 2018 | ASIN: B0742JKLF3, ISBN: 1594039836 | 464 Pages | EPUB | 6.35 MB

John Burdon Sanderson Haldane F.R.S. (1892–1964) was one of the leading scientists of the twentieth century, renowned for helping, through statistical wizardry, to reconcile Darwin’s theory of natural selection with Mendel’s discovery of genes. The product of a distinguished family of scientists and public figures, “JBS” trained and influenced a swathe of students and colleagues at Oxford, Cambridge, and University College London, many of whom, such as the evolutionary theorist John Maynard Smith, went on to distinction in their own right.
As a widely known left-wing “public intellectual,” Haldane gained fame as a popularizer of science and commentator on public affairs, broadcasting often on the BBC and publishing extensively in newspapers and magazines. His collections of popular scientific essays influenced a generation of upcoming scientists and remain in print today. On his death in 1964, he was accorded the rare tribute of a televised self-obituary on the BBC.
Celebrated for his ability to connect seemingly disparate subjects, during the Second World War Haldane was extensively involved in scientific research to aid the British war effort. Using evidence gathered from VENONA Signals Intelligence intercepts, MI5 files, and the Haldane papers, this book reveals that Haldane was also a Soviet spy—a member of the “X Group,” an espionage ring that was run out of the Soviet Embassy in London. His interlocking associations with other spies, such as Ivor Montagu and Hans Kahle; his role as a hardline Stalinist propagandist through the onset of the Cold War; his betrayal of his colleague and friend, the Soviet geneticist Nikolai Vavilov; his long-standing support for the charlatan Soviet “scientist” Trofim D. Lysenko; and his concealed stalemate with the Communist Party of Great Britain once his ability to finesse Lysenko was extinguished, are unraveled here for the first time.

What Would Dolly Do?: How to Be a Diamond in a Rhinestone World by Lauren Marino

English | April 24th, 2018 | ASIN: B0751L2RV1, ISBN: 1538713004 | 256 Pages | EPUB | 10.30 MB

A spirited homage to Dolly Parton that captures the unique humor, no-nonsense wisdom, flash, and sass of one of America’s most iconic stars.
One of twelve children raised in a shack in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Dolly Parton grew to become an international superstar famous for classic songs such as “Jolene,” “9 to 5,” “The Coat of Many Colors,” and “I Will Always Love You.” She is a reflection of the American dream, a role model for the ages, and a mentor to a whole new generation of entertainers. There is much to be learned from her unique brand, her big heart and spirituality, her grit and work ethic.
This lively, illustrated book–part biography, part inspiration, part words of wisdom and life lessons–highlights the very best of the “Dolly Mama,” from her quotable Dollyisms, unrelenting positivity, and powerful spirituality, to her belief in the human ability to overcome adversity. Drawing on Dolly’s two autobiographies, cookbooks and songs; as well as artifacts; books by her family members; biographies; and decades worth of television, print interviews and performances, What Would Dolly Do? shows you how to tap into your Inner Dolly with confidence, faith, and humor.

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