Facing Up to Global Warming What is Going on and How You Can Make a Difference

Politics, Sociology

Facing Up to Global Warming: What is Going on and How You Can Make a Difference?
Population Reconstruction
Rousseau’s Theory of Human Association: Transparent and Opaque Communities
Simone Bateman, Sylvie Allouche, Jean Gayon, “Inquiring into Animal Enhancement: Model or Countermodel of Human Enhancement?”
Innovation and Social Learning: Institutional Adaptation in an Era of Technological Change

Facing Up to Global Warming: What is Going on and How You Can Make a Difference?

2015 | 408 Pages | ISBN: 331920145X | PDF | 12.4 MB

In this volume, Professor N.F. Gray offers a comprehensive primer on climate change, sustainability, and how the two concepts are related. This book consists of fifteen chapters, each treating a specific aspect of the current global crisis, including scientific background as well as an up to date appraisal of the issue at hand. It covers the reasons behind climate change and the effect it will have on the planet and on the reader directly. Gray also presents readers with the means to assess their own environmental impact and details positive individual and community actions to address global warming.
“Climate change,” “global warming,” and “sustainability” are phrases that almost everyone has heard, whether on the news or around the dinner table. The increasing frequency of major events such as droughts, severe storms, and floods are beginning to make these concepts inescapable, and being fully informed is an absolute necessity for students and indeed for us all.
Nick Gray (PhD, ScD) is a founding member of the Environmental Sciences Unit (1979) at Trinity College Dublin, which was the first center for postgraduate research and training in environmental science and technology in Ireland. He has written a number of books and over 150 research papers and book chapters, and currently serves as the Director of the Trinity Centre for the Environment.

Population Reconstruction

2015 | 301 Pages | ISBN: 3319198831 | PDF | 5.3 MB

This book addresses the problems that are encountered, and solutions that have been proposed, when we aim to identify people and to reconstruct populations under conditions where information is scarce, ambiguous, fuzzy and sometimes erroneous.
The process from handwritten registers to a reconstructed digitized population consists of three major phases, reflected in the three main sections of this book. The first phase involves transcribing and digitizing the data while structuring the information in a meaningful and efficient way. In the second phase, records that refer to the same person or group of persons are identified by a process of linkage. In the third and final phase, the information on an individual is combined into a reconstruction of their life course.
The studies and examples in this book originate from a range of countries, each with its own cultural and administrative characteristics, and from medieval charters through historical censuses and vital registration, to the modern issue of privacy preservation. Despite the diverse places and times addressed, they all share the study of fundamental issues when it comes to model reasoning for population reconstruction and the possibilities and limitations of information technology to support this process.
It is thus not a single discipline that is involved in such an endeavor. Historians, social scientists, and linguists represent the humanities through their knowledge of the complexity of the past, the limitations of sources, and the possible interpretations of information. The availability of big data from digitized archives and the need for complex analyses to identify individuals calls for the involvement of computer scientists. With contributions from all these fields, often in direct cooperation, this book is at the heart of the digital humanities, and will hopefully offer a source of inspiration for future investigations.

Rousseau’s Theory of Human Association: Transparent and Opaque Communities

2006 | 215 Pages | ISBN: 1349533904 | PDF | 22.6 MB

The book explores the characteristic features and political consequences of social interaction when the parties’ intentions are transparent, and when they are opaque. The author develops a theory of association and uses it to elucidate, assess and extend Rousseau’s views of human nature, civil society, the market economy and the republican state.

Simone Bateman, Sylvie Allouche, Jean Gayon, “Inquiring into Animal Enhancement: Model or Countermodel of Human Enhancement?”

2014 | pages: 152 | ISBN: 1349563528 | PDF | 2,4 mb

This book explores issues raised by past and present practices of animal enhancement in terms of their means and their goals, clarifies conceptual issues and identifies lessons that can be learned about enhancement practices, as they concern both animals and humans.

Innovation and Social Learning: Institutional Adaptation in an Era of Technological Change

2002 | 273 Pages | ISBN: 1349412872 | PDF | 1.0 MB

How well suited are the institutions of a region, nation or international regime to the task of coping with the dramatic changes currently underway in the global economy? This volume examines this issue.