Youth Subcultures in Fiction, Film and Other Media Teenage Dreams

History / Military

Tiny New York: The Smallest Things in the Biggest City by Suzi Siegel
Youth Subcultures in Fiction, Film and Other Media: Teenage Dreams
Leah S. Marcus, “How Shakespeare Became Colonial: Editorial Tradition and the British Empire”
Bernard Porter, “The Lion’s Share: A History of British Imperialism 1850-2011”
Settler Colonialism and (Re)conciliation: Frontier Violence, Affective Performances, and Imaginative Refoundings

Tiny New York: The Smallest Things in the Biggest City by Suzi Siegel

English | April 1st, 2018 | ISBN: 1493031503 | 225 Pages | PDF | 7.29 MB

Because in a giant city, sometimes the smallest things get overlooked.
Meet the tiniest standouts in the Big Apple, from a baby dinosaur at the Museum of Natural History to a dinky basketball court in the Village that has produced some of sport’s biggest legends.
Other tiny stars include the NYPD’s smallest bomb-sniffing police dog (45 pounds), the shortest first name (just one letter!), and an itsy-bitsy topless bar (1200 square feet).

Youth Subcultures in Fiction, Film and Other Media: Teenage Dreams

English | PDF,EPUB | 2018 | 277 Pages | ISBN : 3319731882 | 4.62 MB

This collection explores the representation, articulation and construction of youth subcultures in a range of texts and contexts. It brings together scholars working in literary studies, screen studies, sociology and cultural studies whose research interests lie in the aesthetics and cultural politics of youth. It contributes to, and extends, contemporary theoretical perspectives around youth and youth cultures.
Contributors examine a range of topics, including ‘bad girl’ fiction of the 1950s, novels by subcultural writers such as Colin MacInnes, Alex Wheatle and Courttia Newland, as well as screen representations of Mods, the 1990s Rave culture, heavy metal, and the Manchester scene. Others explore interventions into subcultural theory with respect to metal, subcultural locations, abjection, graffiti cultures, and the potential of subcultures to resist dominant power frameworks in both historical and contemporary contexts.

Leah S. Marcus, “How Shakespeare Became Colonial: Editorial Tradition and the British Empire”

English | ISBN: 1138238074, 1138238082 | 2017 | 177 pages | PDF | 7 MB

In this fascinating book, Leah S. Marcus argues that the colonial context in which Shakespeare was edited and disseminated during the heyday of the British Empire has left a mark on Shakespeare’s texts to the present day. How Shakespeare Became Colonial offers a unique and engaging argument, including:
A brief history of the colonial importance of editing Shakespeare;
The colonially inflected racism that hides behind the editing of Othello;
The editing of female characters – colonization as sexual conquest;
The significance of editions that were specifically created for schools in India
during British colonial rule.
Marcus traces important ways in which the colonial enterprise of setting forth the
best possible Shakespeare for world consumption has continued to be visible in the
recent treatment of his playtexts today, despite our belief that we are global or
postcolonial in approach.

Bernard Porter, “The Lion’s Share: A History of British Imperialism 1850-2011”

2012 | ISBN: 140828605X, 1138130184 | English | 424 pages | PDF | 6 MB

As well as presenting a lively narrative of events, Bernard Porter explores a number of broad analytical themes, challenging more conventional and popular interpretations. He sees imperialism as a symptom not of Britain’s strength in the world, but of her decline; and he argues that the empire itself both aggravated and obscured deep-seated malaise in the British economy.

Settler Colonialism and (Re)conciliation: Frontier Violence, Affective Performances, and Imaginative Refoundings

English | PDF,EPUB | 2016 | 270 Pages | ISBN : 1349671797 | 10.39 MB

This book examines the performative life reconciliation and its discontents in settler societies. It explores the refoundings of the settler state and reimaginings of its alternatives, as well as the way the past is mobilized and reworked in the name of social transformation within a new global paradigm of reconciliation and the ‘age of apology’.