Isaiah 40-55 Vol 1 A Critical and Exegetical Commentary

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John Goldingay and David Payne, “Isaiah 40-55 Vol 1: A Critical and Exegetical Commentary”
The Crown and the Fire: Meditations on the Cross and the Life of the Spirit by N. T. Wright
George Weigel, “The Courage To Be Catholic: Crisis, Reform, And The Future Of The Church”
Ulrich F. Berges, “The Book of Isaiah: Its Composition and Final Form”
David J. A. Clines, Kent Harold Richards, Jacob L. Wright, “Making a Difference: Essays on the Bible and Judaism in Honor of Tamara Cohn Eskenazi”

John Goldingay and David Payne, “Isaiah 40-55 Vol 1: A Critical and Exegetical Commentary”

2007 | pages: 425 | ISBN: 0567044610 | PDF | 24,5 mb

For over one hundred years International Critical Commentaries have had a special place among works on the Bible. They bring together all the relevant aids to exegesis – linguistic, textual, archaeological, historical, literary, and theological – to help the reader understand the meaning of the books of the Old and New Testaments. The new commentaries continue this tradition. All new evidence now available is incorporated and new methods of study are applied. The authors are of the highest international standing. No attempt has been made to secure a uniform theological or critical approach to the biblical text: contributors have been invited for their scholarly distinction, not for their adherence to any one school of thought.

The Crown and the Fire: Meditations on the Cross and the Life of the Spirit by N. T. Wright

English | September 5th, 2014 | ASIN: B006WCFKKU, ISBN: 0802871798 | 144 Pages | EPUB | 0.25 MB

This popular book by N. T. Wright offers thirteen powerful meditations and sermons that challenge readers to assess anew the meaning of Jesus’ death and resurrection and the life of the Spirit in Jesus’ followers today.

George Weigel, “The Courage To Be Catholic: Crisis, Reform, And The Future Of The Church”

2002 | pages: 257 | ISBN: 0465092608 | PDF | 8,6 mb

The Catholic Church in America is in a state of crisis. Yet few understand what the crisis really is, why it happened, or how the Church must respond to it. As no other commentator or critic has done, George Weigel situates the current crisis of sexual abuse and episcopal malfeasance in the context of recent Catholic history. With honesty and critical rigor, he reveals the Church’s failure to embrace the true spiritual promise of Vatican II, a failure that has resulted in the gradual but steady surrender to liberal culture that he dubs “Catholic Lite.” Drawing upon his unparalleled knowledge of how the Church works, both in America and in Rome, Weigel exposes the patterns of dissent and self-deception that became entrenched in seminaries, among priests, and ultimately among the bishops who failed their flock by thinking like managers instead of apostles. But, Weigel reminds us, in the Biblical world a “crisis” is a time of great opportunity, an invitation to deeper faith. Every great crisis of the Church’s past, from the Dark Ages to the Reformation, has resulted in a period of reform that returned the Church-and its priesthood-to its roots. Weigel sets forth an agenda for genuine reform that challenges seminarians, priests, bishops, and the laity to lead more integrally Catholic lives. As he argues so persuasively, the answer to the present crisis will not be found in “Catholic Lite” but in classic Catholicism: a Catholicism that has reclaimed the wisdom of the past in order to face the corruptions of the present and create a strong future.

Ulrich F. Berges, “The Book of Isaiah: Its Composition and Final Form”

2012 | pages: 622 | ISBN: 1907534598 | PDF | 6,7 mb

Study of the book of Isaiah has in recent times been strongly marked by a tension between synchronic and diachronic approaches. The first is favoured mainly by English-speaking, the second by German-speaking scholars. Berges’s book attempts to mediate between the two poles, arguing that the final form analysis and the tracing of the development of that form are deeply interdependent. This new research paradigm is applied here to the entire text of the book of Isaiah. Berges works consistently from the synchronic to the diachronic and back again to the evolved synchronous final form. Features that have been repeatedly observed-the cross-connections, key word associations, resumption of themes, and especially the bracketing of the book by chaps. 1 and 66-are traces of a deliberate interweaving of various small compositions as well as of larger literary redactions. The paradigm most suited to the book of Isaiah in all its complexity is not that of one comprehensive overall structure or final redaction, but that of smaller compositions that build on one another, come into conversation with one another, and, each in its own way, bring into play specific contemporary problems. We should not force a common thematic denominator on the book, but it becomes clear that Jerusalem and Zion belong to the basic tenor of the book of Isaiah as it was developed and refashioned through the centuries. The Book of Isaiah: Its Composition and Final Form is translated by Millard C. Lind from its German original, Das Buch Jesaja: Komposition und Endgestalt (Freiburg: Herder, 1998).

David J. A. Clines, Kent Harold Richards, Jacob L. Wright, “Making a Difference: Essays on the Bible and Judaism in Honor of Tamara Cohn Eskenazi”

2012 | pages: 394 | ISBN: 1907534725 | PDF | 3,1 mb

Tamara Cohn Eskenazi has a special place in contemporary biblical scholarship. Among the first to bring a focus of scholarly attention to the period of ancient Israel’s creativity after the Exile, she has also been a leader in foregrounding the Jewish tradition within the interpretative discourse of biblical scholars. And as a woman scholar, she has advanced the study of issues in the Hebrew Bible that impinge on the concerns of women ancient and modern. Tamara Eskenazi was awarded the 2008 National Jewish Book Award for her volume The Torah: A Women’s Commentary and the 2011 National Jewish Book Award in Women’s Studies for her commentary on Ruth in the Jewish Publication Society Bible Commentary series. The 26 articles offered to Tamara Eskenazi by her friends in this volume represent the range of her interests in all things biblical and Jewish. From Genesis to the New Testament to modern Hebrew fiction, from technical studies on the prophets or Qumran to penetrating insights on her beloved philosopher Levinas, this volume beautifully represents the range and depth of Jewish culture. The contributors are Rachel Adler, Annette Aronowicz, Judith R. Baskin, Athalya Brenner, Mark G. Brett, Catherine Chalier, David J.A. Clines, William Cutter, Pamela Eisenbaum, David Ellenson, Lisbeth S. Fried, Frederick E. Greenspahn, Sara Japhet, Gary N. Knoppers, Francis Landy, Adriane Leveen, Heather A. McKay, David L. Petersen, Jack M. Sasson, Jesper Svartvik, Marvin A. Sweeney, Phyllis Trible, Gene M. Tucker, Andrea L. Weiss, H.G.M. Williamson and Jacob L. Wright.