We Were Going to Win, Or Die There With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan

Biographies

We Were Going to Win, Or Die There : With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan
On Strawberry Hill : The Transcendent Love of Gifford Pinchot and Laura Houghteling
Sharp Knife: Andrew Jackson and the American Indians
Goat Castle : A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South
Journeys Through Paradise : Pioneering Naturalists in the Southeast, Reprint Edition

We Were Going to Win, Or Die There : With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1574416898 | 334 Pages | PDF | 3.72 MB

In 1940, native West Texan Roy H. Elrod joined the Marine Corps. A few years later his unit, the 8th Marine Regiment, went into the fight at Guadalcanal, where he commanded a platoon of 37 mm gunners. They endured Japanese attacks, malarial tropical weather, and starvation rations. His combat leadership earned him a Silver Star and a battlefield promotion.
On D-Day at Tarawa his platoon waded their 37 mm cannons ashore, each weighing nearly 1,000 pounds, through half a mile of bullet-laced surf to get to an island where the killing never stopped. His was the only platoon to get its guns ashore and into action that first day. At Saipan, Elrod commanded a platoon of 75 mm halftracks, but he was riddled with shrapnel from an enemy artillery shell that took him out of the war.
Fred H. Allison interviewed Elrod, drew upon wartime letters home, and provided annotations to the narrative of this young Marine infantry officer, a job that had an extremely low survival potential.
“We Were Going to Win, or Die There is an excellent way to experience the war through the eyes of one brave man who was there.”—Eric Hammel, author of Guadalcanal: Starvation Island
“We are indeed indebted to the late Major Roy H. Elrod, USMC for completing his account of a combat Marine during World War II before he passed away. We are also thankful for the foresight of his editor, Dr. Fred H. Allison. This memoir will become required reading for all students of the great Pacific War well into the future.”—Charles P. Neimeyer, Director of History Division, Marine Corps University

On Strawberry Hill : The Transcendent Love of Gifford Pinchot and Laura Houghteling

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0817358943 | 134 Pages | PDF | 3.19 MB

While not a biography of legendary American forester and conservationist Gifford Pinchot, On Strawberry Hill: The Transcendent Love of Gifford Pinchot and Laura Houghteling explores a vital and transformative facet of his personal life that, until now, has remained relatively unknown.
At its core, Paula Ivaska Robbins’s On Strawberry Hill: The Transcendent Love of Gifford Pinchot and Laura Houghteling is a human interest story that cuts a neat slice across nineteenth-century America by bringing into juxtaposition a wide array of topics germane to the period–the national fascination with spiritualism, the death scourge that was tuberculosis, the rise of sanitariums and tourism in the southern highlands, the expansion of railroad travel, the rage for public parklands and playgrounds, and the development of professional forestry and green preservation’ all through the very personal love story of two young blue bloods.
Born into a wealthy New York family, Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946) served two terms as Pennsylvania’s governor and was the first chief of the US Forest Service, which today manages 192 million acres across the country. Pinchot also created the Society of American Foresters, the organization that oversees his chosen profession, and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the oldest forestry school in America. Ultimately, he and his friend President Theodore Roosevelt made forestry the focus of a national land conservation movement.
But before these accomplishments, Gifford Pinchot fell in love with Laura Houghteling, daughter of the head of the Chicago Board of Trade, while she recuperated from “consumption” at Strawberry Hill, the family retreat in Asheville, North Carolina. In his twenties at the time and still a budding forester, Pinchot was working just across the French Broad River at George Vanderbilt’s great undertaking, the Biltmore Estate, when the young couple’s relationship blossomed. Although Laura would eventually succumb to the disease, their brief romance left an indelible mark on Gifford, who recorded his ongoing relationship, and mental conversations, with Laura in his daily diary entries long after her death. He steadfastly remained a bachelor for twenty years while accomplishing the major highlights of his career.
This poignant book focuses on that phenomenon of devotion and inspiration, providing a unique window into the private practice of spiritualism in the context of Victorian mores, while offering new perspectives on Pinchot and early American forestry. In addition, preeminent Pinchot biographer Char Miller contributes an excellent foreword.

Sharp Knife: Andrew Jackson and the American Indians

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1440860394 | 262 Pages | PDF | 1.16 MB

Early in his career as an Indian fighter, American Indians gave Andrew Jackson a name–Sharp Knife–that evoked their sense of his ruthlessness and cruelty. Contrary to popular belief–and to many textbook accounts–in 1830, Congress did not authorize the forcible seizure of Indian land and the deportation of the legal owners of that land. In actuality, U.S. President Andrew Jackson violated the terms of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, choosing to believe that he was not bound to protect Native Indian individuals’ rights. Sharp Knife: Andrew Jackson and the American Indians draws heavily on Jackson’s own writings to document his life and give readers sharp insight into the nature of racism in ante-bellum America. Noted historian Alfred Cave’s latest book takes readers into the life of Andrew Jackson, paying particular attention to his interactions with Native American peoples as a militia general, treaty negotiator, and finally as president of the United States. Cave clearly depicts the many ways in which Jackson’s various dishonorable actions and often illegal means undermined the political and economic rights that were supposed to be guaranteed under numerous treaties. Jackson’s own economic interests as a land speculator and slave holder are carefully documented, exposing the hollowness of claims that “Old Hickory” was the champion of “the common man.”

Goat Castle : A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South

English | 2017 | ISBN: 1469635038 | 240 Pages | PDF | 8.45 MB

In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery—known in the press as the ‘Wild Man’ and the ‘Goat Woman’—enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their goats and other livestock, which prompted journalists to call the estate ‘Goat Castle.’ Pearls was killed by an Arkansas policeman in an unrelated incident before he could face trial. However, as was all too typical in the Jim Crow South, the white community demanded ‘justice,’ and an innocent black woman named Emily Burns was ultimately sent to prison for the murder of Merrill. Dana and Dockery not only avoided punishment but also lived to profit from the notoriety of the murder by opening their derelict home to tourists.
Strange, fascinating, and sobering, Goat Castle tells the story of this local feud, killing, investigation, and trial, showing how a true crime tale of fallen southern grandeur and murder obscured an all too familiar story of racial injustice.

Journeys Through Paradise : Pioneering Naturalists in the Southeast, Reprint Edition

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0813054869 | 328 Pages | ePUB | 11 MB

Following the original steps of pioneering naturalists, Gail Fishman profiles thirteen men who explored North America’s southeastern wilderness between 1715 and the 1940s, including John James Audubon, Mark Catesby, John and William Bartram, John Muir, and Alvan Wentworth Chapman. The book is also Fishman’s personal travelogue as she experiences the landscape through their eyes and describes the changes that have occurred along the region’s trails and streams.
Traveling by horseback, boat, and foot, these naturalists–dedicated to their task and blessed with passion and insatiable curiosity–explored gentle mountains, regal forests, and shadowy swamps. Their interests ran deeper than merely cataloging plants and animals. They identified the continent’s foundations and the habits and histories of the flora and fauna of the landscape. Fishman tells us who they were and what compelled them to pursue their work. She evaluates what they accomplished and measures their importance, also pointing out their strengths and failings. And she paints an engaging picture of what America was like at the time.
Fishman combines natural history and American history into a series of portraits that recapture the American Southeast as it was seen by those who first tramped through the wilderness and whose voices from the beginning urged the preservation of wild places.