Trade Policy Issues in Asian Development

Economics and Business

Prema-chandra Athukorala – Trade Policy Issues in Asian Development
Green Asia: Ecocultures, Sustainable Lifestyles, and Ethical Consumption
An Econometric Model of the US Economy: Structural Analysis in 56 Equations By John J. Heim
Marc Baudry, Béatrice Dumont Dumont, “Patents: Prompting or Restricting Innovation?”
William R. Childs, Thomas K. McCraw, “American Business Since 1920: How It Worked, 3rd Edition”

Prema-chandra Athukorala – Trade Policy Issues in Asian Development

Published: 1998-12-09 | ISBN: 0415169275 | PDF | 264 pages | 2.8 MB

This study examines issues of trade policy in the light of the experience of developing Asian economies. Case studies highlight rapidly unfolding issues in trade and development with reference to Sri Lanka, Malaysia, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand.
The issues explored include trade liberalization and industrial adjustment, employment and equity outcomes of export-oriented industrialization, the impact of structural adjustment reforms on savings and investment and the role of foreign direct investment in export expansion.

Green Asia: Ecocultures, Sustainable Lifestyles, and Ethical Consumption

Routledge | English | 2017 | ISBN-10: 1138854085 | 206 pages | PDF | 14.55 mb

by Tania Lewis (Editor)
Economic development in Asia is associated with expanding urbanism, overconsumption, and a steep growth in living standards. At the same time, rapid urbanisation, changing class consciousness, and a new rural–urban divide in the region have led to fundamental shifts in the way ecological concerns are articulated politically and culturally. Moreover, these changes are often viewed through a Western moralistic lens, which at the same time applauds Asia’s economic growth as the welcome reviver of a floundering world economy and simultaneously condemns this growth as encouraging hyperconsumerism and a rupture with more natural ways of living. This book presents an analysis of a range of practices and activities from across Asia that demonstrate that people in Asia are alert to ecological concerns, that they are taking action to implement new styles of green living, and that Asia offers interesting alternatives to narrow Anglo-American models of sustainable living. Subjects explored include eco-tourism in the Philippines, green co-operatives in Korea, the importance of “tradition” within Asian discourses of sustainability, and much more.

An Econometric Model of the US Economy: Structural Analysis in 56 Equations By John J. Heim

English | PDF,EPUB | 2017 | 480 Pages | ISBN : 3319506803 |12.95MB

This book explores the US economy from 1960 to 2010 using a more Keynsian, Cowles model approach, which the author argues has substantial advantages over the vector autoregression (VAR) and dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models used almost exclusively today. Heim presents a robust argument in favor of the Cowles model as an answer to the pressing, unresolved methodological question of how to accurately model the macroeconomy so that policymakers can reliably use these models to assist their decision making.
Thirty-eight behavioral equations, describing determinants of variables such as consumption, taxes, and government spending, are connected by eighteen identities to construct a comprehensive model of the real US economy that Heim then tests across four different time periods to ensure that results are consistent. This comprehensive demonstration of the value of a long-ignored model provides overwhelming evidence that the more Keynesian (Cowles) structural models outperform VAR and DSGE, and therefore should be the models of choice in future macroeconomic studies.

Marc Baudry, Béatrice Dumont Dumont, “Patents: Prompting or Restricting Innovation?”

2017 | ISBN-10: 1786301180 | 274 pages | PDF | 2,5 MB

The patent system is criticized today by some practitioners and economists. In fact, there is a partial disconnection between patent demographics and productivity gains, but also the development of actors who do not innovate and who develop business models that their detractors equate with a capture of annuities or a dangerous commodification of patents.
This book provides a less Manichaean view of the position of patents in the system of contemporary innovation. It first recalls that these criticisms are not new, before arguing that if these criticisms have been revived, it is because of a partial shift from an integrated innovation system to a much more fragmented and open system. This shift accompanied the promotion of a more competitive economy. The authors show that this movement is coherent with a more intensive use of patents, but also one that is more focused on their signal function than on their function of direct monetary incentive to innovation.

William R. Childs, Thomas K. McCraw, “American Business Since 1920: How It Worked, 3rd Edition”

2018 | ISBN-10: 1119097290 | 408 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Tells the story of how America’s biggest companies began, operated, and prospered post-World War I
This book takes the vantage point of people working within companies as they responded to constant change created by consumers and technology. It focuses on the entrepreneur, the firm, and the industry, by showing—from the inside—how businesses operated after 1920, while offering a good deal of Modern American social and cultural history. The case studies and contextual chapters provide an in-depth understanding of the evolution of American management over nearly 100 years.
American Business Since 1920: How It Worked presents historical struggles with decision making and the trend towards relative decentralization through stories of extraordinarily capable entrepreneurs and the organizations they led. It covers: Henry Ford and his competitor Alfred Sloan at General Motors during the 1920s; Neil McElroy at Procter & Gamble in the 1930s; Ferdinand Eberstadt at the government’s Controlled Materials Plan during World War II; David Sarnoff at RCA in the 1950s and 1960s; and Ray Kroc and his McDonald’s franchises in the late twentieth century and early twenty-first; and more. It also delves into such modern success stories as Amazon.com, eBay, and Google.
Provides deep analysis of some of the most successful companies of the 20th century
Contains topical chapters covering titans of the 2000s
Part of Wiley-Blackwell’s highly praised American History Series
American Business Since 1920: How It Worked is designed for use in both basic and advanced courses in American history, at the undergraduate and graduate levels.