The Soviet High Command a Military-political History, 1918-1941

History / Military

John Erickson, “The Soviet High Command: a Military-political History, 1918-1941”
Songs for Dead Parents: Corpse, Text, and World in Southwest Chin by Erik Mueggler
Enzo Traverso, “The End of Jewish Modernity”
The 9/11 Generation: Youth, Rights, and Solidarity in the War on Terror by Sunaina Marr Maira
The Russian Empire and the World, 1700-1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment by John P. LeDonne

John Erickson, “The Soviet High Command: a Military-political History, 1918-1941”

2001 | pages: 925 | ISBN: 0714651788, 0415408601 | PDF | 15,2 mb

An objective and documentary history of the earliest origins and formative years of the Workers-Peasants Red Army from the Civil War to the initial disasters of the war with Germany, the Great Patriotic War, culminating in the “battle for Moscow” in November-December 1941.

Songs for Dead Parents: Corpse, Text, and World in Southwest Chin by Erik Mueggler

English | December 2nd, 2017 | ISBN: 022648100X, 022648338X | 347 pages | PDF | 7.71 MB

In a society that has seen epochal change over a few generations, what remains to hold people together and offer them a sense of continuity and meaning? In Songs for Dead Parents, Erik Mueggler shows how in contemporary China death and the practices surrounding it have become central to maintaining a connection with the world of ancestors, ghosts, and spirits that socialism explicitly disavowed.
Drawing on more than twenty years of fieldwork in a mountain community in Yunnan Province, Songs for Dead Parents shows how people view the dead as both material and immaterial, as effigies replace corpses, tombstones replace effigies, and texts eventually replace tombstones in a long process of disentangling the dead from the shared world of matter and memory.
It is through these processes that people envision the cosmological underpinnings of the world and assess the social relations that make up their community. Thus, state interventions aimed at reforming death practices have been deeply consequential, and Mueggler traces the transformations they have wrought and their lasting effects.

Enzo Traverso, “The End of Jewish Modernity”

English | ISBN: 0745336663, 0745336612 | 2016 | 192 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Jewish modernity lasted from the Enlightenment to the Second World War, from the debates that created the Emancipation, to the Holocaust. It was an intellectual, literary, scientific and aesthetic explosion of creativity that took place across Europe. However, this golden age of modern culture has now exhausted its trajectory.
The Jews shifted, through a paradoxical reversal, to the side of domination. Intellectuals were called to order and radicals became liberal, often turning conservative. Anti-Semitism ceased to permeate European national cultures and was replaced by islamophobia, the dominant form of racism at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Judaism transformed into a ‘civil religion’, the memory of the Holocaust changed the old ‘pariah-people’ into a respectable, distinguished minority whose historical legacy allows the liberal West to measure its ethical virtues.
In this provocative book, Enzo Traverso analyses this historical metamorphosis. The End of Jewish Modernity does not condemn or justify, but rather meditates on a closed experience in order to save its heritage, a now threatened by both conservative apology and sterile posthumous idealisation.

The 9/11 Generation: Youth, Rights, and Solidarity in the War on Terror by Sunaina Marr Maira

September 1, 2016 | ISBN: 1479817694, 1479880515 | English | 320 pages | PDF | 4 MB

Explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance
Since the attacks of 9/11, the banner of national security has led to intense monitoring of the politics of Muslim and Arab Americans. Young people from these communities have come of age in a time when the question of political engagement is both urgent and fraught.
In The 9/11 Generation, Sunaina Marr Maira uses extensive ethnography to understand the meaning of political subjecthood and mobilization for Arab, South Asian, and Afghan American youth. Maira explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” forging coalitions based on new racial and ethnic categories, even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance, and organizing around notions of civil rights and human rights. The 9/11 Generation explores the possibilities and pitfalls of rights-based organizing at a moment when the vocabulary of rights and democracy has been used to justify imperial interventions, such as the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Maira further reconsiders political solidarity in cross-racial and interfaith alliances at a time when U.S. nationalism is understood as not just multicultural but also post-racial. Throughout, she weaves stories of post-9/11 youth activism through key debates about neoliberal democracy, the “radicalization” of Muslim youth, gender, and humanitarianism.

The Russian Empire and the World, 1700-1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment by John P. LeDonne

1997 | ISBN: 0195109279, 0195109260 | English | 416 pages | PDF | 8 MB

Both an historical survey of Russia’s expansion during the Imperial Period (1700–1917) and a geopolitical interpretation of its motive and goals, this text also analyzes the policies to contain that expansion on a global scale. The Russian Empire and The World postulates the existence of a permanent geopolitical framework called the Heartland within which a Russian core area fought for hegemony. The text brings together various strands of Russian foreign policy before 1917, showing the consistency and importance of the policy’s purpose and methods. It draws valuable lessons to help readers understand Soviet foreign policy and the renewed pressures Russia faces to restore its position within the Heartland, making this an ideal text for courses in Russian History, International Relations, and Political Science. Ranging from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the end of World War I, The Russian Empire and The World offers the most successful explanation as to how, despite reversals and limitations, Russia succeeded in becoming the world’s largest contiguous land empire in European history.