The Politics of Empire Globalisation in Crisis

History / Military

Alan Freeman, Boris Kagarlitsky, “The Politics of Empire: Globalisation in Crisis”
The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America by Russell Shorto
The Zeppelin by Michael Bélafi, translated by Cordula Werschkun
Gitte Hansen, Steven Ashby, Irene Baug, “Everyday Products in the Middle Ages: Crafts, Consumption and the individual in Northern Europe c. AD 800-1600”
World Air Power Journal Volume 20

Alan Freeman, Boris Kagarlitsky, “The Politics of Empire: Globalisation in Crisis”

English | 2004 | ISBN: 0745321844 | PDF | pages: 296 | 1.1 mb

One of neo-liberalism’s greatest crimes is to downgrade the history of ideas. This book digs deep into history and, in a timely way, celebrates an intellectual but practical approach to the social, economic and environmental threats posed by globalisation. Ann Pettifor, Senior Associate, New Economics Foundation and Editor, Real World Economic Outlook “A book that isn’t afraid to call today’s specific ‘globalization’ process by its proper name – another phase of imperialism! … Strongly recommended for those wishing to understand the damage that is being wreaked in the name of promoting global prosperity and democracy.” Achin VanaikBringing together nine leading writers and activists from around the world, this book explores the origins of a new age of Empire.The contributors show globalisation is the driving force behind the new and warlike period that began with the invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq. Writers including Walden Bello, Jayati Ghosh, Kate Hudson, Boris Kagarlitsky and Alan Freeman offer a wealth of factual evidence showing that globalisation has driven apart peoples, classes and nations, shaping and reshaping key regions of the world. Challenging the idea that it is inevitable, they argue that its economic contradictions have thrown the world order that sustained it into crisis.Globalisation’s opponents are shaping a new intellectual tradition. For the first time, the book brings together the critiques thrown up by resistance to globalisation, to war, and to imperialism. Free from ideology and dogma, the book shows how the peace and anti-globalisation movements can join forces and face the coming period of world history.Essential reading for anyone involved in the peace and anti-globalisation movements, this book is also ideal for students of politics, economics and international relations.

The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America by Russell Shorto

English | March 16th, 2004 | ISBN: 1400078679, 0385503490 | 444 pages | EPUB | 5.66 MB

In a landmark work of history, Russell Shorto presents astonishing information on the founding of our nation and reveals in riveting detail the crucial role of the Dutch in making America what it is today.
In the late 1960s, an archivist in the New York State Library made an astounding discovery: 12,000 pages of centuries-old correspondence, court cases, legal contracts, and reports from a forgotten society: the Dutch colony centered on Manhattan, which predated the thirteen “original” American colonies. For the past thirty years scholar Charles Gehring has been translating this trove, which was recently declared a national treasure. Now, Russell Shorto has made use of this vital material to construct a sweeping narrative of Manhattan’s founding that gives a startling, fresh perspective on how America began.
In an account that blends a novelist’s grasp of storytelling with cutting-edge scholarship, The Island at the Center of the World strips Manhattan of its asphalt, bringing us back to a wilderness island—a hunting ground for Indians, populated by wolves and bears—that became a prize in the global power struggle between the English and the Dutch. Indeed, Russell Shorto shows that America’s founding was not the work of English settlers alone but a result of the clashing of these two seventeenth century powers. In fact, it was Amsterdam—Europe’s most liberal city, with an unusual policy of tolerance and a polyglot society dedicated to free trade—that became the model for the city of New Amsterdam on Manhattan. While the Puritans of New England were founding a society based on intolerance, on Manhattan the Dutch created a free-trade, upwardly-mobile melting pot that would help shape not only New York, but America.
The story moves from the halls of power in London and The Hague to bloody naval encounters on the high seas. The characters in the saga—the men and women who played a part in Manhattan’s founding—range from the philosopher Rene Descartes to James, the Duke of York, to prostitutes and smugglers. At the heart of the story is a bitter power struggle between two men: Peter Stuyvesant, the autocratic director of the Dutch colony, and a forgotten American hero named Adriaen van der Donck, a maverick, liberal-minded lawyer whose brilliant political gamesmanship, commitment to individual freedom, and exuberant love of his new country would have a lasting impact on the history of this nation.

The Zeppelin by Michael Bélafi, translated by Cordula Werschkun

English | May 19, 2015 | ISBN: 147382785X | True EPUB | 240 pages | 155 MB

This new publication from Michael Belafi offers some truly intriguing content. Photographs of the mighty Zeppelin at all stages of development feature in a publication that aims to chart the entire course of the airship’s history.
Named after the German Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, an early pioneer of rigid airship development, the Zeppelin was first flown commercially by Deutsch Luftschiffahrts (DELAG), the world’s first airline in revenue service. By mid-1914, DELAG had carried over 10,000 fare-paying passengers on over 1500 flights. When war hit, it was employed to military advantage, wreaking carnage upon Britain’s towns and cities. German defeat in 1918 temporarily halted the airship business (many had to be surrendered under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles), although it did bounce back with the construction of the Graf Zeppelin in the 30s.
A series of terrible accidents was soon to signal the demise of the Zeppelin however; following the Hindenburg disaster of 1937, and in the midst of a host of political and economic issues, the Zeppelin was soon to be consigned to the history books as one of the great aviation relics of the 20th Century. This new publication explores each facet of its history, and concludes by assessing the legacy of rigid airship development, still felt to this day.

Gitte Hansen, Steven Ashby, Irene Baug, “Everyday Products in the Middle Ages: Crafts, Consumption and the individual in Northern Europe c. AD 800-1600”

ISBN: 1782978054 | 2015 | EPUB | 352 pages | 39 MB

The medieval marketplace is a familiar setting in popular and academic accounts of the Middle Ages, but we actually know very little about the people involved in the transactions that took place there, how their lives were influenced by those transactions, or about the complex networks of individuals whose actions allowed raw materials to be extracted, hewn into objects, stored and ultimately shipped for market. Twenty diverse case studies combine leading edge techniques and novel theoretical approaches to illuminate the identities and lives of these much overlooked ordinary people, painting of a number of detailed portraits to explore the worlds of actors involved in the lives of everyday products – objects of bone, leather, stone, ceramics, and base metal – and their production and use in medieval northern Europe. In so doing, this book seeks to draw attention away from the emergent trend to return to systems and global models, and restore to center stage what should be the archaeologists most important concern: the people of the past.

World Air Power Journal Volume 20

1995 | ISBN: 1874023506 | English | 158 Pages | PDF | 168 MB