Secretaries and Statecraft in the Early Modern World

History / Military

Paul M. Dover, “Secretaries and Statecraft in the Early Modern World”
Amy M Froide, “Never Married: Singlewomen in Early Modern England”
Danuta Shanzer, Ian Wood, “Avitus of Vienne: Selected Letters and Prose”
Agricultural Education : in Victoria & the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Melbourne by Lindsay Falvey
An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land: Unfinished Conversations by Jennifer S. H. Brown

Paul M. Dover, “Secretaries and Statecraft in the Early Modern World”

One of the prominent themes of the political history of the 16th and 17th centuries is the waxing influence officials in the exercise of state power, particularly in international relations, as it became impossible for monarchs to stay on top of the increasingly complex demands of ruling.
Encompassing a variety of cultural and institutional settings, these essays examine how state secretaries, prime ministers and favourites managed diplomatic personnel and the information flows they generated. They explore how these officials balanced domestic matters with external concerns, and service to the monarch and state with personal ambition.
By opening various perspectives on policy-making at the level just below the monarch, this volume offers up rich opportunities for comparative history and a new take on the diplomatic history of the period.

Amy M Froide, “Never Married: Singlewomen in Early Modern England”

2007 | pages: 257 | ISBN: 019923762X | PDF | 1,3 mb

Never Married: Singlewomen in Early Modern England investigates a paradox in the history of early modern England: although one third of adult women were never married, these women have remained largely absent from historical scholarship. Amy Froide reintroduces us to the category of difference called marital status and to the significant ways it shaped the life experiences of early modern women. By de-centring marriage as the norm in social, economic, and cultural terms, her book critically refines our current understanding of people’s lives in the past and adds to a recent line of scholarship that questions just how common “traditional” families really were.
This book is both a social-economic study of singlewomen and a cultural study of the meanings of singleness in early modern England. It focuses on never-married women in England’s provincial towns, and on singlewomen from a broad social spectrum. Covering the entire early modern era, it reveals that this was a time of transition in the history of never-married women. During the sixteenth century life-long singlewomen were largely absent from popular culture, but by the eighteenth century they had become a central concern of English society.
As the first book of original research to focus on singlewomen on the period, it also illuminates other areas of early modern history. Froide reveals the importance of kinship in the past to women without husbands and children, as well as to widows, widowers, single men, and orphans. Examining the contributions of working and propertied singlewomen, she is able to illustrate the importance of gender and marital status to urban economies and to notions of urban citizenship in the early modern era. Tracing the origins of the spinster and old maid stereotypes she reveals how singlewomen were marginalized as first the victims and then the villains of Protestant English society.

Danuta Shanzer, Ian Wood, “Avitus of Vienne: Selected Letters and Prose”

2002 | pages: 471 | ISBN: 0853235880 | PDF | 2,0 mb

Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus, bishop of Vienne from c.494 to c.518, is known for his poetic works, but his Latin prose style has led to some neglect of his letters. This first complete translation of the letters into English gives access to an important source for the history of the Burgundian Kingdom in the early sixth century.

Agricultural Education : in Victoria & the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Melbourne by Lindsay Falvey

English | Aug. 7, 2017 | ASIN: B074MQNN31 | 231 Pages | PDF | 4 MB

Agricultural Education remains fundamental to civilization. It is the most consistent productive income of Australia, which is one of the world’s very few net agricultural exporters. Victoria, with only about three percent of the Australia’s area, has been its major source of agricultural output. These three factors – underpinning civilization, creating wealth, and intensity in south-eastern Australia – make Victorian agriculture and its education of national importance and international significance.
The Faculty of Agriculture at the University of Melbourne, at times complemented by La Trobe University and such colleges as Burnley, Dookie, Gilbert Chandler, Glenormiston, Longerenong, Marcus Oldham and McMillan, has underpinned sustained rises in productivity and profitability. But coordination and consistency have not always been its hallmarks.
This history reveals that Agriculture at Melbourne began amidst controversy, grew to fame under a great Dean, at times rested on its laurels and others was dragged into organisational experiments. Its 22 Deans over its 110 years typify the calling evident in its staff. Frequently a leader, the Faculty has recently strengthened its animal sciences by joining with the veterinary sciences – but that is for a future history.

An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land: Unfinished Conversations by Jennifer S. H. Brown

English | Oct. 14, 2018 | ISBN: 1771991712 | 368 Pages | PDF | 3 MB

In 1670, the ancient homeland of the Cree and Ojibwe people of Hudson Bay became known to the English entrepreneurs of the Hudson’s Bay Company as Rupert’s Land, after the founder and absentee landlord, Prince Rupert. For four decades, Jennifer S. H. Brown has examined the complex relationships that developed among the newcomers and the Algonquian communities―who hosted and tolerated the fur traders―and later, the missionaries, anthropologists, and others who found their way into Indigenous lives and territories. The eighteen essays gathered in this book explore Brown’s investigations into the surprising range of interactions among Indigenous people and newcomers as they met or observed one another from a distance, and as they competed, compromised, and rejected or adapted to change.
While diverse in their subject matter, the essays have thematic unity in their focus on the old HBC territory and its peoples from the 1600s to the present. More than an anthology, the chapters of An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land provide examples of Brown’s exceptional skill in the close study of texts, including oral documents, images, artifacts, and other cultural expressions. The volume as a whole represents the scholarly evolution of one of the leading ethnohistorians in Canada and the United States.