NO NONSENSE GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

History / Military

NO NONSENSE GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT by Maggie Black
Sarah M. S. Pearsall, “Atlantic Families: Lives and Letters in the Later Eighteenth Century”
Emily Teeter, “Religion and Ritual in Ancient Egypt”
Matthew T. Rutz, Morag Kersel, “Archaeologies of Text: Archaeology, Technology, and Ethics”
Alexander A. Vasiliev, “History of the Byzantine Empire: Vol. 2, 324-1453, 2nd Edition”

NO NONSENSE GUIDE TO INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT by Maggie Black

English | 20 Sept. 2007 | ISBN: 1904456634 | 154 Pages | PDF | 15 MB

Building dams in India, planting trees in Burkina Faso, rescuing street children in Brazil – these are images of aid and international development with which we can all identify.

Sarah M. S. Pearsall, “Atlantic Families: Lives and Letters in the Later Eighteenth Century”

2009 | pages: 309 | ISBN: 0199532990 | PDF | 2,6 mb

The Atlantic represented a world of opportunity in the eighteenth century, but it represented division also, separating families across its coasts. Whether due to economic shifts, changing political landscapes, imperial ambitions, or even simply personal tragedy, many families found themselves fractured and disoriented by the growth and later fissure of a larger Atlantic world. Such dislocation posed considerable challenges to all individuals who viewed orderly family relations as both a general and a personal ideal.
The more fortunate individuals who thus found themselves “all at sea” were able to use family letters, with attendant emphases on familiarity, sensibility, and credit, in order to remain connected in times and places of considerable disconnection. Portraying the family as a unified, affectionate, and happy entity in such letters provided a means of surmounting concerns about societies fractured by physical distance, global wars, and increasing social stratification. It could also provide social and economic leverage to individual men and women in certain circumstances.
Sarah Pearsall explores the lives and letters of these families, revealing the sometimes shocking stories of those divided by sea. Ranging across the Anglophone Atlantic, including mainland American colonies and states, Britain, and the British Caribbean, Pearsall argues that it was this expanding Atlantic world-much more than the American Revolution-that reshaped contemporary ideals about families, as much as families themselves reshaped the transatlantic world.

Emily Teeter, “Religion and Ritual in Ancient Egypt”

ISBN: 0521848555, 0521613000 | 2011 | EPUB | 266 pages | 3 MB

This book is a vivid reconstruction of the practical aspects of ancient Egyptian religion. Through an examination of artifacts and inscriptions, the text explores a variety of issues. For example, who was allowed to enter the temples, and what rituals were preformed therein? Who served as priests? How were they organized and trained, and what did they do? What was the Egyptians’ attitude toward death, and what happened at funerals? How did the living and dead communicate? In what ways could people communicate with the gods? What impact did religion have on the economy and longevity of the society? This book demystifies Egyptian religion, exploring what it meant to the people and society. The text is richly illustrated with images of rituals and religious objects.

Matthew T. Rutz, Morag Kersel, “Archaeologies of Text: Archaeology, Technology, and Ethics”

2014 | pages: 269 | ISBN: 178297766X | PDF | 15,9 mb

Scholars working in a number of disciplines – archaeologists, classicists, epigraphers, papyrologists, Assyriologists, Egyptologists, Mayanists, philologists, and ancient historians of all stripes – routinely engage with ancient textual sources that are either material remains from the archaeological record or historical products of other connections between the ancient world and our own.
Examining the archaeology-text nexus from multiple perspectives, contributors to this volume discuss current theoretical and practical problems that have grown out of their work at the boundary of the division between archaeology and the study of early inscriptions. In 12 representative case-studies drawn from research in Asia, Africa, the Mediterranean, and Mesoamerica, scholars use various lenses to critically examine the interface between archaeology and the study of ancient texts, rethink the fragmentation of their various specialized disciplines, and illustrate the best in current approaches to contextual analysis.
The collection of essays also highlights recent trends in the development of documentation and dissemination technologies, engages with the ethical and intellectual quandaries presented by ancient inscriptions that lack archaeological context, and sets out to find profitable future directions for interdisciplinary research.

Alexander A. Vasiliev, “History of the Byzantine Empire: Vol. 2, 324-1453, 2nd Edition”

ISBN: 0299809269 | 1958 | EPUB | 478 pages | 1 MB

“This is the revised English translation from the original work in Russian of the history of the Great Byzantine Empire. It is the most complete and thorough work on this subject. From it we get a wonderful panorama of the events and developments of the struggles of early Christianity, both western and eastern, with all of its remains of the wonderful productions of art, architecture, and learning.”—Southwestern Journal of Theology