The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Global Economics

Economics and Business

Financial Modelling with Forward-looking Information: An Intuitive Approach to Asset Pricing (Contributions to Management Science) by Nadi Serhan Aydın
Developing England’s North: The Political Economy of the Northern Powerhouse (Building a Sustainable Political Economy: SPERI Research & Policy) by Craig Berry
Craig Hovey, Gregory Rehmke – The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Global Economics
It’s Not Just the Economy, Stupid! Trade Competitiveness in the 21st Century
Market Liberalism: A Paradigm for the 21st Century by David Boaz

Financial Modelling with Forward-looking Information: An Intuitive Approach to Asset Pricing (Contributions to Management Science) by Nadi Serhan Aydın

English | 14 Jun. 2017 | ISBN: 331957146X | 118 Pages | EPUB | 2.04 MB

This book focuses on modelling financial information flows and information-based asset pricing framework. After introducing the fundamental properties of the framework, it presents a short information-theoretic perspective with a view to quantifying the information content of financial signals, and links the present framework with the literature on asymmetric information and market microstructure by means of a dynamic, bipartite, heterogeneous agent network. Numerical and explicit analyses shed light on the effects of differential information and information acquisition on the allocation of profit and loss as well as the pace of fundamental price discovery. The dynamic programming method is used to seek an optimal strategy for utilizing superior information. Lastly, the book features an implementation of the present framework using real-world financial data.

Developing England’s North: The Political Economy of the Northern Powerhouse (Building a Sustainable Political Economy: SPERI Research & Policy) by Craig Berry

English | 29 Nov. 2017 | ISBN: 3319625594 | 342 Pages | PDF | 3.92 MB

This book explores the politics of local economic development in Northern England. Socio-economic conditions in the North – and its future prospects – have become central to national debates in the UK. The status of Northern regions and their local economies is intimately associated with efforts to ‘rebalance’ the economy away from the South East, London and the finance sector in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. The contributors to this volume focus in particular on the coalition and Conservative governments’ ‘Northern Powerhouse’ agenda. They also analyse associated efforts to devolve power to local authorities across England, which promise to bring both greater prosperity and autonomy to the deindustrialized North. Several chapters critically interrogate these initiatives, and their ambitions, by placing them within their wider historical, geographical, institutional and ideological contexts. As such, Berry and Giovannini seek to locate Northern England within a broader understanding of the political dimension of economic development, and outline a series of ideas for enhancing the North’s prospects.

Craig Hovey, Gregory Rehmke – The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Global Economics

Published: 2008-02-05 | ISBN: 1592576605 | PDF | 272 pages | 2.53 MB

Think outside the borders.
Global economics affects every aspect of our lives. Free trade agreements, tariffs, terrorism, trade deficits, international debt, global warming, OPEC, outsourcing, and sweat shops are just some of the forces driving our world, food supply, jobs, and future. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Global Economics provides the key to understanding the various facts, figures, policies, and practices that offer insight into this dynamic subject.

It’s Not Just the Economy, Stupid! Trade Competitiveness in the 21st Century

English | 2016 | ISBN: 1443887293 | 162 Pages | PDF | 2.5 MB

How does a globally uncompetitive industry compete successfully in specific markets? What shapes the decisions of importers in these markets to purchase inputs from a more costly supplier? Current theories highlight the role of the market or firm strategy as possible explanations. It’s Not Just the Economy, Stupid! Trade Competitiveness in the 21st Century relies on 12 years of research of the US textile industry and the apparel industry throughout the Latin American and Caribbean regions to provide an alternative answer to these questions. The book argues that market factors and business strategies alone do not determine industry competitiveness and firm import behavior. Rather, special international trade programs and regulated trade agreements, which are commonly described as free trade agreements, make it possible for an industry that is less competitive in the global market to become highly competitive in specific markets. Furthermore, these same international trade programs and agreements create incentives for importers to purchase inputs from specific markets, including those with higher costs.
For example, the US textile industry is less cost competitive than the same industry in a number of other countries, such as China. Although less expensive textile suppliers exist, some Latin American and Caribbean countries continue to import a majority of their textiles from the United States for use in their garment exports. The book shows that this particular trend results from special trade programs and regulated trade agreements. The findings presented here complement existing scholarship on international trade by focusing on the behavior of importers rather than exporters. Furthermore, whereas current studies explain how industries compete in the global market, the book shifts the emphasis toward industry competitiveness in specific markets.

Market Liberalism: A Paradigm for the 21st Century by David Boaz

English | Mar. 1, 1993 | ISBN: 0932790984 | 423 Pages | PDF | 6 MB

Essays discuss federal regulations, social security, urban problems, education, budget deficits, health care, and other topics.
The history of the West is largely a history of liberty. Antigone, Jesus, the emergence of pluralism and independent cities, the Magna Carta, the Renaissance, Martin Luther, the Enlightenment, the American Revolution, the repeal of the Corn Laws, the abolition of slavery, all mark continued progress toward the liberation of the individual from the coercive power of the state.
The 19th century seemed the culmination of that progress, a time when, according to the Nation in 1900, “Freed from the vexatious meddling of governments, men devoted themselves to their natural task, the bettering of their condition, with the wonderful results which surround us.” But at the end of that great century of peace, progress, and industrial revolution in Europe, when the triumph of liberty seemed almost complete, many liberals saw the ancien regime returning in a new guise.