The Alchemists Questioning our Faith in Courts as Democracy-Builders (Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law)

Politics, Sociology

The Alchemists: Questioning our Faith in Courts as Democracy-Builders (Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law, v. 18) by Tom Gerald Daly
June Edmunds, Bryan S. Turner, Molly Andrews, “Generational Consciousness, Narrative, and Politics”
Russell J. Dalton, “The Participation Gap: Social Status And Political Inequality”
Alcohol, Power and Public Health : A Comparative Study of Alcohol Policy
Bullwhip Days: The Slaves Remember: An Oral History by James Mellon

The Alchemists: Questioning our Faith in Courts as Democracy-Builders (Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law, v. 18) by Tom Gerald Daly

2018 | ISBN: 1108417949 | English | 390 pages | PDF | 5 MB

Can courts really build democracy in a state emerging from authoritarian rule? This book presents a searching critique of the contemporary global model of democracy-building for post-authoritarian states, arguing that it places excessive reliance on courts. Since 1945, both constitutional courts and international human rights courts have been increasingly perceived as alchemists, capable of transmuting the base materials of a nascent democracy into the gold of a functioning democratic system. By charting the development of this model, and critically analysing the evidence and claims for courts as democracy-builders, this book argues that the decades-long trend toward ever greater reliance on courts is based as much on faith as fact, and can often be counter-productive. Offering a sustained corrective to unrealistic perceptions of courts as democracy-builders, the book points the way toward a much needed rethinking of democracy-building models and a re-evaluation of how we employ courts in this role.

June Edmunds, Bryan S. Turner, Molly Andrews, “Generational Consciousness, Narrative, and Politics”

2002 | pages: 208 | ISBN: 0742517306 | EPUB | 2,0 mb

With the erosion of strong class theory, sociologists have recently started to look at aspects of social stratification other than class. One of the most interesting new areas of investigation is the sociology of generations.
This book brings together the work of scholars who are making a major contribution to this new sociological interest. Through a combination of innovative theoretical and empirical studies, this book shows that an analysis of generations is essential to an understanding of major social, political and intellectual trends in the postwar period. Each author brings to the volume insights from their own area of specialism – with rich illustrative material spanning topics as diverse as African American identity and Spanish youth culture. Theoretical inspiration also comes from a range of traditions, including cultural and historical sociology; social interactionism; social and cognitive psychology and life course theory.
However, a unifying thread emerges around questions about how generations should be conceptualized; the role of trauma generating generational consciousness; the relationship between auto-biography and generational identity and the nature of inter and intra-generational relationships. This volume, therefore, provides a lively contribution to debates about the nature of generations and a stimulating basis for further work in this area.

Russell J. Dalton, “The Participation Gap: Social Status And Political Inequality”

ISBN: 0198733607 | 2017 | PDF | 280 pages | 3 MB

The dilemma of democracy arises from two contrasting trends. More people in the established democracies are participating in civil society activity, contacting government officials, protesting, and using online activism and other creative forms of participation. At the same time, the importance of social status as an influence on political activity is increasing. The democratic principle of the equality of voice is eroding. The politically rich are getting richer-and the politically needy have less voice. This book assembles an unprecedented set of international public opinion surveys to identify the individual, institutional, and political factors that produce these trends. New forms of activity place greater demands on participants, raising the importance of social status skills and resources. Civil society activity further widens the participation gap. New norms of citizenship shift how people participate. And generational change and new online forms of activism accentuate this process. Effective and representative government requires a participatory citizenry and equal voice, and participation trends are undermining these outcomes. The Participation Gap both documents the growing participation gap in contemporary democracies and suggests ways that we can better achieve their theoretical ideal of a participatory citizenry and equal voice.

Alcohol, Power and Public Health : A Comparative Study of Alcohol Policy

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0415637465 | 225 Pages | PDF | 2.66 MB

In recent years, the reduction of alcohol-related harm has emerged as a major policy issue across Europe. Public health advocates, supported by the World Health Organisation, have challenged an approach that targets problem-drinking individuals, calling instead for governments to control consumption across whole populations through a combination of pricing strategies, restrictions on retail availability and marketing regulations.
Alcohol, Power and Public Health explores the emergence of the public health perspective on alcohol policy in Europe, the strategies alcohol control policy advocates have adopted, and the challenges they have faced in the political context of both individual states and the European Union.
The book provides a historical perspective on the development of alcohol policy in Europe using four case studies – Denmark, England, Scotland and Ireland. It explores the relationship between evidence, values and power in a key area of political decision-making and considers what conditions create – or prevent – policy change. The case studies raise questions as to who sets policy agendas, how social problems are framed and defined, and how governments can balance public health promotion against both commercial interests and established cultural practices.
This book will be of interest to academics and researchers in policy studies, public health, social science, and European Union studies.

Bullwhip Days: The Slaves Remember: An Oral History by James Mellon

English | December 23rd, 2014 | ASIN: B00THMCCLC, ISBN: 1555842100, 0802138683 | 482 Pages | EPUB | 9.51 MB

In the 1930s, the Works Progress Administration commissioned an oral history of the remaining former slaves. Bullwhip Days is a remarkable compendium of selections from these extraordinary interviews, providing an unflinching portrait of the world of government-sanctioned slavery of Africans in America.
Here are twenty-nine full narrations, as well as nine sections of excerpts related to particular aspects of slave life, from religion to plantation life to the Reconstruction era. Skillfully edited, these chronicles bear eloquent witness to the trials of slaves in America, reveal the wide range of conditions of human bondage, and provide sobering insight into the roots of racism in today’s society.