Solomon’s Builders Freemasons, Founding Fathers and the Secrets of Washington D. C

History / Military

Solomon’s Builders: Freemasons, Founding Fathers and the Secrets of Washington D. C. by Christopher Hodapp
Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World edited by John G. Gager
War Neurology (Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience) by L. Tatu
Edward Caudill, “Intelligently Designed: How Creationists Built the Campaign against Evolution”
Mika Ojakangas, “On the Greek Origins of Biopolitics: A Reinterpretation of the History of Biopower”

Solomon’s Builders: Freemasons, Founding Fathers and the Secrets of Washington D. C. by Christopher Hodapp

English | December 21, 2006 | ISBN: 1569755795 | EPUB | 324 pages | 3.5 MB

DID THE FREEMASONS CREATE THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA?
Step back in time to the birth of a revolutionary new republic and discover how the utopian ideals of a visionary secret society laid the foundation for the most powerful nation on earth. Follow George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and other Founding Fathers as they transform the democratic principles of their Masonic lodges into a radical new nation.
Solomon’s Builders unravels history from myth as it takes you on a Freemason’s tour of Washington, D.C. It reveals the evidence of Masonic influence during the construction of America and its new capital, including clues hidden in plain sight:
•Masonic connections to national monuments
•Puzzling pentagrams and symbolism in city streets
•The mysterious temples of the “Widow’s Sons”
Solomon’s Builders relates the true stories of these visionary founders, and the fascinating meaning behind the cryptic codes, enigmatic symbols and intriguing architecture that is reputedly the basis for the sequel to The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown’s novel The Lost Symbol.

Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World edited by John G. Gager

English | September 24, 1992 | ISBN: 0195062264, 0195134826 | EPUB | 296 pages | 4.3 MB

In the ancient Greco-Roman world, it was common practice to curse or bind an enemy or rival by writing an incantation on a tablet and dedicating it to a god or spirit. These curses or binding spells, commonly called defixiones were intended to bring other people under the power and control of those who commissioned them. More than a thousand such texts, written between the 5th Century B.C.E. and the 5th Century C.E., have been discovered from North Africa to England, and from Syria to Spain. Extending into every aspect of ancient life–athletic and theatrical competitions, judicial proceedings, love affairs, business rivalries, and the recovery of stolen property–they shed light on a new dimension of classical study previously inaccessible.
Here, for the first time, these texts have been translated into English with a substantial translator’s introduction revealing the cultural, social, and historical context for the texts. This book will interest historians, classicists, scholars of religion, and those concerned with ancient magic.

War Neurology (Frontiers of Neurology and Neuroscience) by L. Tatu

English | 4 Apr. 2016 | ISBN: 3318056057 | 244 pages | PDF | 4.96 MB

Interest in the history of neurological science has increased significantly during the last decade, but the significance of war has been overlooked in related research. In contrast, this book highlights war as a factor of progress in neurological science. Light is shed on this little-known topic through accounts given by neurologists in war, experiences of soldiers suffering from neurological diseases, and chapters dedicated to neurology in total and contemporary war. Written by experts, the contributions in this book focus on the Napoleonic Wars, the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, World Wars I and II, and recent conflicts such as Vietnam or Afghanistan. Comprehensive yet concise and accessible, this book serves as a fascinating read for neurologists, neurosurgeons, psychiatrists, historians, and anyone else interested in the history of neurology.

Edward Caudill, “Intelligently Designed: How Creationists Built the Campaign against Evolution”

English | ISBN: 0252079523, 0252038010 | 2013 | 217 pages | PDF | 1 MB

Tracing the growth of creationism in America as a political movement, this book explains why the particularly American phenomenon of anti-evolution has succeeded as a popular belief. Conceptualizing the history of creationism as a strategic public relations campaign, Edward Caudill examines why this movement has captured the imagination of the American public, from the explosive Scopes trial of 1925 to today’s heated battles over public school curricula. Caudill shows how creationists have appealed to cultural values such as individual rights and admiration of the rebel spirit, thus spinning creationism as a viable, even preferable, alternative to evolution. In particular, Caudill argues that the current anti-evolution campaign follows a template created by Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan, the Scopes trial’s primary combatants. Their celebrity status and dexterity with the press prefigured the Moral Majority’s 1980s media blitz, more recent staunchly creationist politicians such as Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee, and creationists’ savvy use of the Internet and museums to publicize their cause. Drawing from trial transcripts, media sources, films, and archival documents, Intelligently Designed highlights the importance of historical myth in popular culture, religion, and politics and situates this nearly century-old debate in American cultural history.

Mika Ojakangas, “On the Greek Origins of Biopolitics: A Reinterpretation of the History of Biopower”

English | ISBN: 1138659436 | 2016 | 124 pages | PDF | 2 MB

This book explores the origins of western biopolitics in ancient Greek political thought. Ojakangas’s argues that the conception of politics as the regulation of the quantity and quality of population in the name of the security and happiness of the state and its inhabitants is as old as the western political thought itself: the politico-philosophical categories of classical thought, particularly those of Plato and Aristotle, were already biopolitical categories. In their books on politics, Plato and Aristotle do not only deal with all the central topics of biopolitics from the political point of view, but for them these topics are the very keystone of politics and the art of government.
Yet although the Western understanding of politics was already biopolitical in classical Greece, the book does not argue that the history of biopolitics would constitute a continuum from antiquity to the twentieth century. Instead Ojakangas argues that the birth of Christianity entailed a crisis of the classical biopolitical rationality, as the majority of classical biopolitical themes concerning the government of men and populations faded away or were outright rejected. It was not until the renaissance of the classical culture and literature – including the translation of Plato’s and Aristotles political works into Latin – that biopolitics became topical again in the West.
The book will be of great interest to scholars and students in the field of social and political studies, social and political theory, moral and political philosophy, IR theory, intellectual history, classical studies.