Madness and the Romantic Poet A Critical History

Psychology

Madness and the Romantic Poet: A Critical History by James Whitehead
From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle by Mariska Leunissen
Cheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy by Mark Regnerus
The Beast of Birkenshaw: Life of Serial Killer Peter Manuel by Jack Smith
What Makes Time Special? by Craig Callender

Madness and the Romantic Poet: A Critical History by James Whitehead

2017 | ISBN: 0198733704 | English | 320 pages | PDF | 6 MB

Madness and the Romantic Poet examines the longstanding and enduringly popular idea that poetry is connected to madness and mental illness. The idea goes back to classical antiquity, but it was given new life at the turn of the nineteenth century. The book offers a new and much more complete history of its development than has previously been attempted, alongside important associated ideas about individual genius, creativity, the emotions, rationality, and the mind in extreme states or disorder – ideas that have been pervasive in modern popular culture. More specifically, the book tells the story of the initial growth and wider dissemination of the idea of the ‘Romantic mad poet’ in the nineteenth century, how (and why) this idea became so popular, and how it interacted with the very different fortunes in reception and reputation of Romantic poets, their poetry, and attacks on or defences of Romanticism as a cultural trend generally – again leaving a popular legacy that endured into the twentieth century.
Material covered includes nineteenth-century journalism, early literary criticism, biography, medical and psychiatric literature, and poetry. A wide range of scientific (and pseudoscientific) thinkers are discussed alongside major Romantic authors, including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Hazlitt, Lamb, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Keats, Byron, and John Clare. Using this array of sources and figures, the book asks: was the Romantic mad genius just a sentimental stereotype or a romantic myth? Or does its long popularity tell us something serious about Romanticism and the role it has played, or has been given, in modern culture?

From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle by Mariska Leunissen

2017 | ISBN: 019060221X | English | 248 pages | PDF | 2 MB

From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle discusses Aristotle’s biological views about character and the importance of what he calls ‘natural character traits’ for the development of moral virtue as presented in his ethical treatises. The aim is to provide a new, comprehensive account of the physiological underpinnings of moral development and thereby to show, first, that Aristotle’s ethical theories do not exhaust his views about character as has traditionally been assumed, and, second, that his treatment of natural character in the biological treatises provides the conceptual and ideological foundation for his views about habituation as developed in his ethics. Author Mariska Leunissen takes seriously Aristotle’s–often ignored–claim that nature is one of the factors through which men become ‘good and capable of fine deeds’. Part I (‘The Physiology of Natural Character’) analyzes, in three chapters, Aristotle’s notion of natural character as it is developed in the biological treatises and its role in moral development, especially as it affects women and certain ‘barbarians’-groups who are typically left out of accounts of Aristotle’s ethics. Leunissen also discuss its relevance for our understanding of physiognomical ideas in Aristotle. Part II (‘The Physiology of Moral Development) explores the psychophysical changes in body and soul one is required to undergo in the process of acquiring moral virtues. It includes a discussion of Aristotle’s eugenic views, of his identification of habituation as a form of human perfection, and of his claims about the moral deficiencies of women that link them to his beliefs about their biological imperfections.

Cheap Sex: The Transformation of Men, Marriage, and Monogamy by Mark Regnerus

2017 | ISBN: 0190673613 | English | 280 pages | PDF | 1 MB

Sex is cheap. Coupled sexual activity has become more widely available than ever. Cheap sex has been made possible by two technologies that have little to do with each other – the Pill and high-quality pornography – and its distribution made more efficient by a third technological innovation, online dating. Together, they drive down the cost of real sex, and in turn slow the development of love, make fidelity more challenging, sexual malleability more common, and have even taken a toll on men’s marriageability.
Cheap Sex takes readers on an extended tour inside the American mating market, and highlights key patterns that characterize young adults’ experience today, including the timing of first sex in relationships, overlapping partners, frustrating returns on their relational investments, and a failure to link future goals like marriage with how they navigate their current relationships. Drawing upon several large nationally-representative surveys, in-person interviews with 100 men and women, and the assertions of scholars ranging from evolutionary psychologists to gender theorists, what emerges is a story about social change, technological breakthroughs, and unintended consequences. Men and women have not fundamentally changed, but their unions have. No longer playing a supporting role in relationships, sex has emerged as a central priority in relationship development and continuation. But unravel the layers, and it is obvious that the emergence of “industrial sex” is far more a reflection of men’s interests than women’s.

The Beast of Birkenshaw: Life of Serial Killer Peter Manuel by Jack Smith

English | February 15th, 2016 | ASIN: B01BUHNPL2 | 93 pages | AZW3 | 0.71 MB

Some serial killers seem surreal, as if it’s almost impossible to believe that an individual could do such horrific crimes. The Beast of Birkenshaw, a.k.a. Peter Manuel, was such an individual man.
Peter Manuel was Scotland’s first serial killer and certainly the country’s most notorious mass murderer. But he was so much more than that. As well as the horrific nature of his murders, which killed men, women, and children, he possessed a constant arrogance and a swift intelligence that often allowed him to operate right underneath the noses of the local law enforcement. Always happy to embarrass the police in Glasgow and the surrounding area, he waged a lifelong battle of wits which ended with him being hanged.
But the legend of Peter Manuel lives on. He had a penchant not only for violent killings, but for having the audacity to represent himself in court. Sometimes, this was successful and sometimes it was not. But each time, he was noted for his deft ability to out manoeuvre the best police officers Glasgow had to offer. When he eventually faced his last court hearing, it was described in the tabloids as the Trial of the Century. In this book, we will attempt to look into the history of the killer and the reasons he might have had for carrying out his horrific series of crimes.

What Makes Time Special? by Craig Callender

2017 | ISBN: 0198797303 | English | 336 pages | PDF | 4 MB

As we navigate through life we instinctively model time as having a flowing present that divides a fixed past from open future. This model develops in childhood and is deeply saturated within our language, thought and behavior, affecting our conceptions of the universe, freedom and the self. Yet as central as it is to our lives, physics seems to have no room for this flowing present. What Makes Time Special? demonstrates this claim in detail and then turns to two novel positive tasks. First, by looking at the world “sideways” – in the spatial directions – it shows that physics is not “spatializing time” as is commonly alleged. Even relativity theory makes significant distinctions between the spacelike and timelike directions, often with surprising consequences. Second, if the flowing present is an illusion, it is a deep one worthy of explanation. The author develops a picture whereby the temporal flow arises as an interaction effect between an observer and the physics of the world.
Using insights from philosophy, cognitive science, biology, psychology and physics, the theory claims that the flowing present model of time is the natural reaction to the perceptual and evolutionary challenges thrown at us. Modeling time as flowing makes sense even if it misrepresents it.