Escape Artist The Incredible Second World War of Johnny Peck

Biographies

Escape Artist: The Incredible Second World War of Johnny Peck by Peter Monteath
Karen: A True Story Told by Her Mother by Marie Killilea
Trouble In Mind: Bob Dylan’s Gospel Years – What Really Happened by Clinton Heylin
Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago by William Elliott Hazelgrove
Across Canada By Story: A Coast-to-Coast Literary Adventure by Douglas Gibson

Escape Artist: The Incredible Second World War of Johnny Peck by Peter Monteath

English | September 1st, 2017 | ASIN: B074PMMDMQ, ISBN: 1742242847, 1742248322 | 303 Pages | EPUB | 5.81 MB

The never-before-told story of World War II escape artist extraordinaire, Johnny Peck.
In August 1941, an eighteen-year-old Australian soldier made his first prison break – an audacious night-time escape from a German prisoner-of-war camp in Crete. Astoundingly, this was only the first of many escapes.
An infantryman in the 2/7 Battalion, Johnny Peck was first thrown into battle against Italian forces in the Western Desert. Campaigns against Hitler’s Wehrmacht and Luftwaffe in Greece and Crete followed. When Crete fell to the Germans at the end of May 1941, Peck was trapped on the island with hundreds of other men. On the run, they depended on their wits, the kindness of strangers, and sheer good luck.
When Peck’s luck ran out, he was taken captive by the Germans, then the Italians. Later, after his release from a Piedmontese jail following the Italian Armistice of 1943, and at immense risk to his own life, Peck devoted himself to helping POWs cross the Alps to safety. Captured once more, Peck was sentenced to death and detained in Milan’s notorious, Gestapo-run San Vittore prison – until escaping again, this time into Switzerland.
Historian Peter Monteath reveals the action-packed tale of one young Australian soldier and his remarkable war.

Karen: A True Story Told by Her Mother by Marie Killilea

English | April 12th, 2016 | ASIN: B01C54MIPS, ISBN: 0135146380 | 262 Pages | EPUB | 0.63 MB

Winner of the Christopher Award: This bestseller tells the inspirational true story of a girl with cerebral palsy and the mother who wouldn’t give up on her.
In 1940, when Karen Killilea was born three months premature and developed cerebral palsy, doctors encouraged her parents to put her in an institution and forget about her. At the time, her condition was considered untreatable, and institutionalization was the only recourse. But in a revolutionary act of faith and love, the Killileas never gave up hope that Karen could lead a successful life.
Written by Karen’s mother, Marie, this memoir is a profound and heartwarming personal account of a young mother’s efforts to refute the medical establishment’s dispiriting advice, and her daughter’s extraordinary triumph over seemingly insurmountable odds. Marie’s activism spread awareness of the mistreatment of disabled people in America and led to the formation of multiple foundations, including United Cerebral Palsy.
A larger-than-life story, Karen tells of a family’s courage, patience, and struggle in the face of extreme difficulty. The New York Times wrote, “You’ll want to read it most for Karen’s own words: ‘I can walk, I can talk. I can read. I can write. I can do anything.’”

Trouble In Mind: Bob Dylan’s Gospel Years – What Really Happened by Clinton Heylin

English | November 28th, 2017 | ASIN: B076VHYLH8, ISBN: 1944713298, 1901927725 | 336 Pages | EPUB | 5.57 MB

In 1979 there was… trouble in mind, and trouble in store for the ever-iconoclastic Dylan. But unlike in 1965-66, the artifactal afterglow – three albums in three years, Slow Train Coming, Saved and Shot of Love – barely reflected the explosion of faith and inspiration.
One has to look elsewhere, and in Trouble In Mind, Clinton Heylin has; connecting the dots on the man’s gospel years by drawing on a wealth of new information, newly-found recordings and new interviews. His primary goal? To make the case for a wholesale re-evaluation of the music Bob Dylan produced in these inspiring times.

Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago by William Elliott Hazelgrove

English | September 15th, 2017 | ASIN: B073T65H63, ISBN: 1442272260 | 480 Pages | EPUB | 4.30 MB

Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair: The End of the Gangster Era in Chicago is a historical look at Chicago during the darkest days of the Great Depression. The story of Chicago fighting the hold that organized crime had on the city to be able to put on The 1933 World’s Fair.
William Hazelgrove provides the exciting and sprawling history behind the 1933 World’s Fair, the last of the golden age. He reveals the story of the six millionaire businessmen, dubbed The Secret Six, who beat Al Capone at his own game, ending the gangster era as prohibition was repealed. The story of an intriguing woman, Sally Rand, who embodied the World’s Fair with her own rags to riches story and brought sex into the open. The story of Rufus and Charles Dawes who gave the fair a theme and then found financing in the worst economic times the country had ever experienced. The story of the most corrupt mayor of Chicago, William Thompson, who owed his election to Al Capone; and the mayor who followed him, Anton Cermak, who was murdered months before the fair opened by an assassin many said was hired by Al Capone.
But most of all it’s the story about a city fighting for survival in the darkest of times; and a shining light of hope called A Century of Progress.

Across Canada By Story: A Coast-to-Coast Literary Adventure by Douglas Gibson

English | September 15, 2015 | ISBN: 1770412530 | EPUB | 280 pages | 11.2 MB

More adventures from one of Canada’s premier editors and storytellers
Canada is a country rich in stories, and few take as much joy as Douglas Gibson in discovering them. As one of the country’s leading editors and publishers for 40 years, he coaxed modern classics out of some of Canada’s finest minds, and then took to telling his own stories in his first memoir, Stories About Storytellers.
Gibson turned his memoir into a one-man stage show that eventually played almost 100 times, in all ten provinces, from coast to coast. As a literary tourist, he discovered even more about the land and its writers and harvested many more stories, from distant past and recent memory, to share.
Now in Across Canada by Story, Gibson brings new stories about Robertson Davies, Jack Hodgins, W.O. Mitchell, Alistair MacLeod, and Alice Munro, and adds lively portraits of Al Purdy, Marshall McLuhan, Margaret Laurence, Guy Vanderhaeghe, Margaret Atwood, Wayne Johnson, Linwood Barclay, Michael Ondaatje, and many, many others. Whether fly fishing in Haida Gwaii or sailing off Labrador, Douglas Gibson is a first-rate ambassador for Canada and the power of great stories.