Great Plains Bison

Animals related

A Savage History: Whaling in the Pacific and Southern Oceans by John Newton
Great Plains Bison
Theron Humphrey, “Maddie Lounging On Things: A Complex Experiment Involving Canine Sleep Patterns”
Susan D. Jones, “Valuing Animals: Veterinarians and Their Patients in Modern America”
Lisa S. Freund, Sandra McCune, Layla Esposito, Nancy R. Gee, Peggy McCardle, “The Social Neuroscience of Human-Animal Interaction”

A Savage History: Whaling in the Pacific and Southern Oceans by John Newton

English | June 1st, 2013 | ISBN: 1742233740 | 310 pages | True PDF | 49.77 MB
Celebrated, revered, and studied, whales hold particular allure, but for much of history they have been relentlessly hunted throughout the oceans. A Savage History is a powerful account of a complex and bloody relationship that tells the rich history of whales and whaling, following the stories of whalers from the 18th century to the present day.
It explores not only the drama and danger of whaling but the ways in which whales have infused human imagination throughout history. The book also covers the end of industrial whaling and the work still to do to protect these magnificent and intelligent creatures.

Great Plains Bison

English | 2017 | ISBN: 0803285779 | 143 Pages | PDF | 3 MB
A Project of the Center for Great Plains Studies and the School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska
Great Plains Bison traces the history and ecology of this American symbol from the origins of the great herds that once dominated the prairie to its near extinction in the late nineteenth century and the subsequent efforts to restore the bison population.
A longtime wildlife biologist and one of the most powerful literary voices on the Great Plains, Dan O’Brien has managed his own ethically run buffalo ranch since 1997. Drawing on both extensive research and decades of personal experience, he details not only the natural history of the bison but also its prominent symbolism in Native American culture and its rise as an icon of the Great Plains. Great Plains Bison is a tribute to the bison’s essential place at the heart of the North American prairie and its ability to inspire naturalists and wildlife advocates in the fight to preserve American biodiversity.

Theron Humphrey, “Maddie Lounging On Things: A Complex Experiment Involving Canine Sleep Patterns”

English | ISBN: 1419726757 | 2017 | EPUB | 160 pages | 100 MB
Maddie the coonhound has captured the hearts and imaginations of dog lovers all around the world. Maddie Lounging On Things follows Maddie’s adventures at play and at rest as she accompanies her owner, Theron, from Utah to Illinois to Mexico and everywhere in between. From cross-country trips sleeping in cars and cheap motels to visiting family near and far, Maddie finds a way to settle in for a nap in any set of circumstances. This collection highlights Maddie’s snuggly, cuddly side, as she curls up in unexpected places, belly flops onto sofas all over the country, and nestles herself into the lap of her much-loved owner. These sweet, touching, and oftentimes silly photos will be absolutely irresistible to Maddie’s fans and dog lovers just getting to know her.

Susan D. Jones, “Valuing Animals: Veterinarians and Their Patients in Modern America”

English | 2002 | ISBN: 0801871298 | PDF | pages: 233 | 1.0 mb
Over the course of the twentieth century, the relationship between Americans and their domestic animals has changed dramatically. In the 1890s, pets were a luxury, horses were the primary mode of transport, and nearly half of all Americans lived or worked on farms. Today, the pet industry is a multibillion-dollar-a-year business, keeping horses has become an expensive hobby, and consumers buy milk and meat in pristine supermarkets. Veterinarians have been very much a part of these changes in human-animal relationships. Indeed, the development of their profession―from horse doctor to medical scientist―provides an important perspective on these significant transformations in America’s social, cultural, and economic history.
In Valuing Animals, Susan D. Jones, trained as both veterinarian and historian, traces the rise of veterinary medicine and its impact on the often conflicting ways in which Americans have assessed the utility and worth of domesticated creatures. She first looks at how the eclipse of the horse by motorized vehicles in the early years of the century created a crisis for veterinary education, practice, and research. In response, veterinarians intensified their activities in making the livestock industry more sanitary and profitable. Beginning in the 1930s, veterinarians turned to the burgeoning number of house pets whose sentimental value to their owners translated into new market opportunities. Jones describes how vets overcame their initial doubts about the significance of this market and began devising new treatments and establishing appropriate standards of care, helping to create modern pet culture.
Americans today value domestic animals for reasons that typically combine exploitation and companionship. Both controversial and compelling, Valuing Animals uncovers the extent to which veterinary medicine has shaped―and been shaped by―this contradictory attitude.

Lisa S. Freund, Sandra McCune, Layla Esposito, Nancy R. Gee, Peggy McCardle, “The Social Neuroscience of Human-Animal Interaction”

ISBN: 1433821761 | 2016 | PDF | 256 pages | 3 MB
In this wide-ranging and fascinating volume, an international and cross-disciplinary group of authors seek to understand human-animal interaction (HAI) by applying research in the neurobiology and genetics that underlie human social functioning. Chapters examine HAI from evolutionary and developmental perspectives, and weigh the implications of HAI research for animal welfare. Clinical applications include animal-assisted therapies for people with disabilities, acute or chronic health conditions, and social or emotional difficulties.
Intended for researchers in social neuroscience and HAI as well as clinicians, teachers and animal-rights activists, and anyone interested in how and why animals affect us the way they do.

See also