Helping School Refusing Children and Their Parents A Guide for School-based Professionals

Politics, Sociology

Helping School Refusing Children and Their Parents: A Guide for School-based Professionals by Christopher Kearney
Global Competition: Law, Markets, and Globalization by David Gerber
The Celebration Chronicles: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Property Value in Disney’s New Town by Andrew Ross
Philip Massolin, “Canadian Intellectuals, the Tory Tradition, and the Challenge of Modernity, 1939-1970”
Sarah Raveling, “Self-Representation Before International Criminal Tribunals”

Helping School Refusing Children and Their Parents: A Guide for School-based Professionals by Christopher Kearney

2008 | ISBN: 0195320247 | English | 192 pages | PDF | 0.7 MB
Children who miss substantial amounts of school pose one of the most vexing problems for school officials. In many cases, school personnel must assess these students and successfully help them to return to the academic setting. This can be difficult considering most school-based professionals are pressed for time and do not have access to proper resources. The information in this book can help school officials combat absenteeism and reduce overall dropout rates.
Designed for guidance counselors, teachers, principals and deans, school psychologists, school-based social workers, and other school professionals, this book outlines various strategies for helping children get back to school with less distress that can easily be implemented in schools. The book describes four clinical interventions that can be used to effectively address moderate cases of absenteeism, as well as instructions for adapting these procedures for use within the school system. A chapter on assessment describes several methods for identifying school refusal behavior, including time-limited techniques for school officials who have little opportunity to conduct detailed evaluations. Worksheets for facilitating assessment are included and can easily be photocopied from the book. Other chapters provide advice for working collaboratively with parents, preventing relapse, and tackling special issues such as children with anxiety, children who take medication, and children who are victims of bullying. Topics such as poverty, homelessness, teenage pregnancy, violence, and school safety are also addressed.

Global Competition: Law, Markets, and Globalization by David Gerber

2010 | ISBN: 0199228221, 0199652007 | English | 350 pages | PDF | 2 MB
Global competition now shapes economies and societies in ways unimaginable only a few years ago, and competition (or ‘antitrust’) law is a key component of the legal framework for global competition. These laws are intended to protect competition from distortion and restraint, and on the national level they reflect the relationships between markets, their participants, and those affected by them. The current legal framework for the global economy is provided, however, by national laws and institutions. This means that those few governments that have sufficient ‘power’ to apply their laws to conduct outside their own territory provide the norms of global competition. This has long meant that the US (and, more recently, the EU) structure global competition, but China and other countries are increasingly using their economic and political leverage to apply their own competition laws to global markets. The result is increasing uncertainty, costs, and conflicts that burden global economic development.
This book examines competition law on the global level and reveals its often complex and little-understood dynamics. It focuses on the interactions between national and international legal regimes that are central to these dynamics and a key to understanding them.
Part I examines the evolution of the current global system, the factors that have shaped it, how it operates today, and recent efforts to alter that system-e.g., by including competition law in the WTO. Part II focuses on national competition law systems, revealing how national laws and experiences shape global competition law dynamics and how global factors, in turn, shape national laws and experiences. It examines the central roles of US and European law and experience, and it also pays close attention to countries such as China that are playing increasingly important roles in the global competition law arena. Part III analyzes current strategies for improving the legal framework for global competition and identifies the factors that may contribute to a system that more effectively supports global economic and political development. This analysis also suggests a pathway for moving toward that goal.

The Celebration Chronicles: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Property Value in Disney’s New Town by Andrew Ross

English | August 3, 1999 | ISBN: 0345417518, 0345417526 | EPUB | 352 pages | 5.2 MB
“Planned with impeccably correct intentions, built with improperly low-wage labor, and sold on the basis of improbably lavish guarantees, Celebration would be put to the test time and time again. . . . True to the ethos of the blockbuster box-office hit, would this town deliver on the promise of its business plan or its community plan? Or would it sidestep all expectations and play by a different script?”
Scholar and iconoclast Andrew Ross set out to answer these questions by spending a year living in the much scrutinized, and often demonized, Celebration–the picture-perfect town that Disney is building for 20,000 people in the swamp and scrub of central Florida. Lavishly planned with a downtown center and newly-minted antique homes, and front-loaded with an ultra-progressive school, hospital, and high-tech infrastructure, Celebration would be yet another fresh start in a word gone wrong. Yet behind the picket fences, gleaming facades, and “Kodak moment” streetscapes, Ross discovered genuine, complex, and often surprising truths.
In this compelling, eye-opening account, based on his personal encounters and on several hundred hours of interviews with residents, employees, and county locals, Ross records what went right and what went wrong in this latest version of the American Dream. Diverse in background, Celebration’s pioneers were united by a desire to escape the cheerless isolation of suburbia and reconnect with the neighbors. They were also dazzled by the Disney brand name and expected much more than they got. The Celebration Chronicles recounts their often unruly struggles to build a community in the face of adversity: shoddy construction, typecasting by the media, Disney’s skittishness about negative publicity, and friction with the working-class county of Osceola. An acute observer in the controversial school, Ross takes us to the front lines of a superheated battle of wills between educators and townspeople.
What does Celebration reveal about the state of contemporary culture? Is this model town a cause for celebration or alarm? Can we entrust the public interest to giant beneficiaries of the marketplace like Disney? One of our shrewdest social commentators, Ross brilliantly places this planned community within the context of the New Urbanist movement to combat suburban sprawl and restore public life to the nation’s increasingly privatized landscape. Powerful, wide-ranging in its analysis, The Celebration Chronicles is a provocative account of the inner life of a new American town.

Philip Massolin, “Canadian Intellectuals, the Tory Tradition, and the Challenge of Modernity, 1939-1970”

2001 | pages: 368 | ISBN: 0802035094 | PDF | 20,2 mb
In this well-researched book, Philip Massolin takes a fascinating look at the forces of modernization that swept through English Canada, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century. Victorian values – agrarian, religious – and the adherence to a rigid set of philosophical and moral codes were being replaced with those intrinsic to the modern age: industrial, secular, scientific, and anti-intellectual. This work analyses the development of a modern consciousness through the eyes of the most fervent critics of modernity – adherents to the moral and value systems associated with Canada’s tory tradition. The work and thought of social and moral critics Harold Innis, Donald Creighton, Vincent Massey, Hilda Neatby, George P. Grant, W.L. Morton, Northrop Frye, and Marshall McLuhan are considered for their views of modernization and for their strong opinions on the nature and implications of the modern age. These scholars shared concerns over the dire effects of modernity and the need to attune Canadians to the realities of the modern age. Whereas most Canadians were oblivious to the effects of modernization, these critics perceived something ominous: far from being a sign of true progress, modernization was a blight on cultural development. In spite of the efforts of these critics, Canada emerged as a fully modern nation by the 1970s. Because of the triumph of modernity, the toryism that the critics advocated ceased to be a defining feature of the nation’s life. Modernization, in short, contributed to the passing of an intellectual tradition centuries in the making and rapidly led to the ideological underpinnings of today’s modern Canada.

Sarah Raveling, “Self-Representation Before International Criminal Tribunals”

2014 | pages: 469 | ISBN: 3848708752 | PDF | 2,4 mb
This book assesses the practical repercussions of self-representation on the conduct of international criminal proceedings. It discusses above all the actual implications of defendants acting as their own counsel for international criminal trials. The book looks at the current situation of recognition, exercise, and restriction of self-representation before international criminal tribunals, outlining the significant developments of this practical framework over the years. This book argues that in order to safeguard the overall guarantee of fair and expeditious proceedings, the active participation of defendants has to see a different implementation in future international criminal proceedings.