Vertical Readings in Dante’s Comedy Volume 2

Cultures / Languages

Vertical Readings in Dante’s Comedy: Volume 2 by George Corbett
Antony Miall, David Milsted, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the English”
Nick Yapp, Michel Syrett, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the French (2nd edition)”
David Ross, “Xenophobe’s Guide to the Scots”
John Winterson-Richards, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the Welsh”

Vertical Readings in Dante’s Comedy: Volume 2 by George Corbett

English | Dec. 12, 2016 | ISBN: 1783742534 | 306 Pages | PDF | 2 MB
Vertical Readings in Dante’s Comedy is a reappraisal of the poem by an international team of thirty-four scholars. Each vertical reading analyses three same-numbered cantos from the three canticles: Inferno i, Purgatorio i and Paradiso i; Inferno ii, Purgatorio ii and Paradiso ii; etc. Although scholars have suggested before that there are correspondences between same-numbered cantos that beg to be explored, this is the first time that the approach has been pursued in a systematic fashion across the poem.
This collection – to be issued in three volumes – offers an unprecedented repertoire of vertical readings for the whole poem. As the first volume exemplifies, vertical reading not only articulates unexamined connections between the three canticles but also unlocks engaging new ways to enter into core concerns of the poem. The three volumes thereby provide an indispensable resource for scholars, students and enthusiasts of Dante.
The volume has its origin in a series of thirty-three public lectures held in Trinity College, the University of Cambridge (2012-2016) which can be accessed at the Cambridge Vertical Readings in Dante’s Comedy website.

Antony Miall, David Milsted, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the English”

2008 | ISBN-10: 1906042292 | 92 pages | EPUB | 0,5 MB
“Never overstep the mark””Moderationa treasured idealmeans a lot to the English. Their respect for it is reflected in their shared dislike of any person who goes too far. “”””Irrational rationality””The English can admire something without enjoying it, or enjoy something they suspect is fundamentally reprehensible. You can never be sure which stance they are going to takethe reassuringly reasonable, or the wildly irrational.””””I’m fine, really””Stoicism, the capacity to greet life’s vicissitudes with cheerful calm, is an essential ingredient of Englishness.””””Push-me, pull-you””Two equally fundamental but contradictory English characteristics are a love of continuity and a yearning for change. In the English character these two opposite desires vie with each other constantly, which produces some curious behavior patterns and several characteristics most usually observed in the classic split personality.””

Nick Yapp, Michel Syrett, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the French (2nd edition)”

2008 | ISBN-10: 1906042322 | 96 pages | EPUB | 0,5 MB
“”France is a country that eats, drinks and breathes philosophy. There is not a farmer, fisherman, waiter, car-worker, shop assistant or housewife who isn’t a closet Diderot or Descartes, a Saint-Simon or a Sartre.”””
“French politicians look smart because power itself is chic, attractive, seductive, and one should dress to look the part. The French electorate would never allow any government to intervene in their lives if it were shabbily dressed.””

David Ross, “Xenophobe’s Guide to the Scots”

2008 | ISBN-10:1906042470 | 92 pages | EPUB | 0,5 MB
“Innate instincts””A Scotsman likes to feel that, almost by instinct, he could guddle a trout (palm it out of the water) or gralloch a deer (disembowel it with his knife), even if he spends his day driving a bus or designing software.””””A kilty cover-up””If the Scots were to shed their seriousness, they would be noisier than the Neapolitans and wilder than the dancing Dervishes. Their reserve is not a defense against the rest of the world: it is a protective cover, like the lid of a nuclear reactor.””””Rob joy””Calvinism is still deeply ingrained in the Scottish soul. A Scottish poet, overcome by the joy of sunshine and blue sky, once cried out what a fine day it was. The woman to whom he spoke replied, We’ll pay for it, we’ll pay for it. “”””Cunning and clever””The Scots respect cleverness and like to feel that they possess plenty of it themselves. In Scotland there is nothing wrong with being clever, so long as you show it by words or actions, rather than by bragging. You don’t have to hide it. To say of someone that he has a good conceit of himself is neither praise nor blame, just a statement of fact.””

John Winterson-Richards, “The Xenophobe’s Guide to the Welsh”

2008 | ISBN-10: 1906042519 | 92 pages | EPUB | 0,5 MB
“Welsh willfulness””The Welsh are stubbornvery, very stubborn. The Welsh themselves would probably rather say tenacious, but to anyone on the receiving end a better description might well be bloody-minded. “”””Proud and proud of it””Welsh pride is real pridethe sort of mindless, instinctive, animal pride that requires no justification or excuse. It is simply pride for the sake of pride. Such pride is the only thing one has left when one has been stripped of everything else.””””It’s not unusual to be . . . an actor””Given the propensity of Welsh people of all types to overact at every given opportunity, it is not surprising that those who manage to tone it down a bit have gone on to world fame as actors (or politicians, who are, after all, only an inferior species of actors).””””Warriors at heart””The Welsh are extremely proficient at rugby. They enjoy it and they take it seriously. This is because rugbywith its physical aggression, tactics, disciplined use of brute force, and organized violenceis the closest thing modern day life can offer to Wales’ traditional national sport: war.””