The Marxism of Che Guevara Philosophy, Economics, Revolutionary Warfare

Politics, Sociology

The Marxism of Che Guevara: Philosophy, Economics, Revolutionary Warfare (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series) by Michael Löwy
Liberation in Print: Feminist Periodicals and Social Movement Identity (Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America Ser.) by Agatha Beins
Overheating: An Anthropology of Accelerated Change
Food Parcels in International Migration: Intimate Connections By Dr. Diana Mata-Codesal, Dr. Maria Abranches
Rethinking Fisheries Governance: The Role of States and Meta-Governance By Dr. Hoang Viet Thang

The Marxism of Che Guevara: Philosophy, Economics, Revolutionary Warfare (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series) by Michael Löwy

2007 | English | 178 pages | EPUB | 0.5 MB
In this seminal exploration of Che Guevara’s contributions to Marxist thinking, Michael Löwy traces Che’s ideas about Marxism both as they related to Latin America and to more general philosophical, political, and economic issues. Now revised and updated, this edition includes a chapter on Guevara’s search for a new paradigm of socialism and a substantive essay by Peter McLaren on Che’s continued relevance today. Löwy portrays Guevara as a revolutionary humanist who considered all political questions from an internationalist viewpoint. For him, revolutionary movements in Latin America were part of a world process of emancipation. Löwy considers especially Che’s views on the contradiction between socialist planning and the law of value in the Cuban economy and his search for an alternative road to the “actually existing socialism” of the Stalinist and post-Stalinist Soviet bloc.
Che’s varied occupations—doctor and economist, revolutionary and banker, agitator and ambassador, industrial organizer and guerrilla fighter—were expressions of a deep commitment to social change. This book eloquently captures his views on humanity, his contributions to the theory of revolutionary warfare, and his ideas about society’s transition to socialism, offering a cohesive, nuanced introduction to the range of Guevara’s thought.

Liberation in Print: Feminist Periodicals and Social Movement Identity (Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America Ser.) by Agatha Beins

2017 | English | 224 pages | EPUB | 1 MB
This is the first analysis of periodicals’ key role in U.S. feminism’s formation as a collective identity and set of political practices in the 1970s. Between 1968 and 1973, more than five hundred different feminist newsletters and newspapers were published in the United States. Agatha Beins shows that the repetition of certain ideas in these periodicals―ideas about gender, race, solidarity, and politics―solidified their centrality to feminism.
Beins focuses on five periodicals of that era, comprising almost three hundred different issues: Distaff (New Orleans, Louisiana); Valley Women’s Center Newsletter (Northampton, Massachusetts); Female Liberation Newsletter (Cambridge, Massachusetts); Ain’t I a Woman? (Iowa City, Iowa); and L.A. Women’s Liberation Newsletter, later published as Sister (Los Angeles, California). Together they represent a wide geographic range, including some understudied sites of feminism. Beins examines the discourse of sisterhood, images of women of color, feminist publishing practices, and the production of feminist spaces to demonstrate how repetition shaped dominant themes of feminism’s collective identity. Beins also illustrates how local context affected the manifestation of ideas or political values, revealing the complexity and diversity within feminism.
With much to say about the study of social movements in general, Liberation in Print shows feminism to be a dynamic and constantly emerging identity that has grown, in part, out of a tension between ideological coherence and diversity. Beins’s investigation of repetition offers an innovative approach to analyzing collective identity formation, and her book points to the significance of print culture in activist organizing.

Overheating: An Anthropology of Accelerated Change

Pluto Press | English | 2016 | 192 pages | PDF | 2.01 mb
by Thomas Hylland Eriksen (Author)
We live in a time of global crisis—or, more appropriately, crises: overlapping, interlocking global problems that are inextricably tied to modernity. Overheating offers a groundbreaking new way of looking at the problems of the Anthropocene, exploring crises of the environment, economy, and identity through an anthropological lens. Thomas Hylland Eriksen argues that while each of these crises is global in scope, they are nonetheless perceived and responded to locally—and that once we realize that, we begin to see the contradictions that abound between the standardizing forces of global capitalism and the socially embedded nature of people and local practices. Only by acknowledging the primacy of the local, Eriksen shows, can we begin to even properly understand, let alone address, these problems on a global scale.

Food Parcels in International Migration: Intimate Connections By Dr. Diana Mata-Codesal, Dr. Maria Abranches

English | PDF | 2017 (2018 Edition) | 229 Pages | 2.53 MB
This book takes food parcels as a vehicle for exploring relationships, intimacy, care, consumption, exchange, and other fundamental anthropological concerns, examining them in relation to wider transnational spaces. As the contributors to this volume argue, food and its related practices offer a window through which to examine the reconciliation of people’s localised intimate experiences with globalising forces.
Their analyses contribute to an embodied and sensorial approach to social change by examining migrants and their families’ experiences of global connectedness through familiar objects and narratives. By bringing in in-depth ethnographic insights from different social and economic contexts, this book widens the understanding of the lived experiences of mobility and goes beyond the divide between origin and destination countries, therefore contributing to new ways of thinking about migration and transnationalism that take into consideration the materiality of global connections and the way such connections are embodied and experienced at the local level.

Rethinking Fisheries Governance: The Role of States and Meta-Governance By Dr. Hoang Viet Thang

English | PDF | 2017 (2018 Edition) | 221 Pages| 2.16 MB
This book explores how the state can foster collective action by fisher’s communities in fisheries management. It presents a different perspective from Elinor Ostrom’s classic work on the eight institutional conditions that foster collective action in natural resource management and instead emphasizes the role of the state in fisheries co-management, engaging a state-centric notion of ‘meta-governance’.
It argues that first, the state is required to foster collective action by fishers; and secondly, that the current fisheries co-management arrangements are state-centric. The study develops these arguments through the analysis of three case studies in Japan, Vietnam and Norway. The author also makes a theoretical contribution to governance literature by developing Ostrom’s ‘society-centric’ framework in a way which makes it more amenable to the analysis of state capacity and government intervention in a comparative context. This book will appeal to students and scholars of global governance, fisheries management, co-management, and crisis management, as well as practitioners of fisheries management.