The Limits of the Green Economy From re-inventing capitalism to re-politicising the present

Politics, Sociology

Anneleen Kenis, “The Limits of the Green Economy: From re-inventing capitalism to re-politicising the present”
Policing the Crisis Mugging, the State and Law and Order by Stuart Hall, Chas Critcher , Tony Jefferson, John Clarke, Brian Roberts
Surviving Justice: America’s Wrongfully Convicted and Exonerated by Dave Eggers, Lola Vollen
Michael Blake, “Justice and Foreign Policy”
Clive Jones, Tore T. Petersen, “Israel’s Clandestine Diplomacies”

Anneleen Kenis, “The Limits of the Green Economy: From re-inventing capitalism to re-politicising the present”

English | ISBN: 1138781703, 1138055689 | 2017 | 170 pages | PDF | 1 MB
Projecting win-win situations, new economic opportunities, green growth and innovative partnerships, the green economy discourse has quickly gained centre stage in international environmental governance and policymaking. Its underlying message is attractive and optimistic: if the market can become the tool for tackling climate change and other major ecological crises, the fight against these crises can also be the royal road to solving the problems of the market. But how ‘green’ is the green economy? And how social or democratic can it be?
This book examines how the emergence of this new discourse has fundamentally modified the terms of the environmental debate. Interpreting the rise of green economy discourse as an attempt to re-invent capitalism, it unravels the different dimensions of the green economy and its limits: from pricing carbon to emissions trading, from sustainable consumption to technological innovation. The book uses the innovative concept of post-politics to provide a critical perspective on the way green economy discourse represents nature and society (and their interaction) and forecloses the imagination of alternative socio-ecological possibilities. As a way of repoliticising the debate, the book advocates the construction of new political faultlines based on the demands for climate justice and democratic commons.
This book will be of interest to students and scholars of environmental politics, political ecology, human geography, human ecology, political theory, philosophy and political economy.
Includes a foreword written by Erik Swyngedouw (Professor of Geography, Manchester University).

Policing the Crisis Mugging, the State and Law and Order by Stuart Hall, Chas Critcher , Tony Jefferson, John Clarke, Brian Roberts

English | April 23rd, 2013 | ISBN: 1137007184 | 473 pages | True PDF | 3.15 MB
This special 35th anniversary edition contains the original, unchanged text that inspired a generation, alongside two new chapters that explore the book’s continued significance for today’s readers.
The Preface provides a brief retrospective account of the book’s original structure, the rich ethnographic, intellectual and theoretical work that informed it, and the historical context in which it appeared. In the new Afterword, each of the authors takes up a specific theme from the original book and interrogates it in the light of current crises, perspectives and contexts.

Surviving Justice: America’s Wrongfully Convicted and Exonerated by Dave Eggers, Lola Vollen

English | October 1st, 2015 | ASIN: B015BWIUPI, ISBN: 1786632241, 1786632861 | 490 pages | EPUB | 1.07 MB
On September 30, 2003, Calvin was declared innocent and set free from Angola State Prison, after serving 22 years for a crime he did not commit.
Like many other exonerees, Calvin experienced a new world that was not open to him. Hitting the streets without housing, money, or a change of clothes, exonerees across America are released only to fend for themselves. In the tradition of Studs Terkel’s oral histories, this book collects the voices and stories of the exonerees for whom life — inside and out — is forever framed by extraordinary injustice.

Michael Blake, “Justice and Foreign Policy”

English | ISBN: 0199552002 | 2013 | 160 pages | PDF | 1 MB
This book is an argument about the moral foundations of foreign policy. It argues that a liberal state can insist upon the universal reach of liberal ideas, while still distinguishing between what is owed to citizens and what is owed to foreign citizens. This liberalism includes a concern for liberal toleration, which is intended to defend the proposition that a liberal state can work for democratization and liberalism abroad, without being intolerant or illiberal in doing so. What constraints there are on foreign policy emerge not from the need to tolerate undemocratic regimes, but from the prudential reason that there are few effective and proportional means by which such regimes might be liberalized. It also argues that international inequality is wrong only when and to the extent this inequality can be shown to undermine the democratic self-rule of a society. Global poverty and underdevelopment is wrong for reasons quite unlike the reasons given to condemn domestic inequality. These facts are combined to give an attractive and coherent picture of how the foreign policy of a liberal state might be morally evaluated.

Clive Jones, Tore T. Petersen, “Israel’s Clandestine Diplomacies”

English | ISBN: 0199330662 | 2013 | EPUB | 320 pages | 2 MB
For over sixty years the state of Israel has proved adept at practising clandestine diplomacy–about which little is known, as one might expect. These hitherto undisclosed episodes in Israel’s diplomatic history are revealed for the first time by the contributors to this volume, who explore how relations based upon patronage and personal friendships, as well as ties born from kinship and realpolitik both informed the creation of the state and later defined Israel’s relations with a host of actors, both state and non-state. The authors focus on the extent to which Israel’s clandestine diplomacies have indeed been regarded as purely functional and sub- ordinate to a realist quest for security amid the perceived hostility of a predominantly Muslim-Arab world, or have in fact proved to be manifestations of a wider acceptance–political, social and cultural–of a Jewish sovereign state as an intrinsic part of the Middle East. They also discuss whether clandestine diplomacy has been more effective in securing Israeli objectives than reliance upon more formal diplomatic ties constrained by inter- national legal obligations and how this often complex and at times contradictory matrix of clandestine relationships continues to influence perceptions of Israel’s foreign policy.