Music Learning Today Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing, and Responding to Music

Music

William I. Bauer, “Music Learning Today: Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing, and Responding to Music”
Gerald Klickstein, “The Musician’s Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance, and Wellness”
Martin Schuring, “Oboe Art and Method”
Paul Collins, “The Stylus Phantasticus and Free Keyboard Music of the North German Baroque”
Tamara Roberts, “Resounding Afro Asia: Interracial Music and the Politics of Collaboration”

William I. Bauer, “Music Learning Today: Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing, and Responding to Music”

English | 2014 | 224 pages | PDF | 2 MB Technology has become increasingly integrated into our daily lives, receiving a great deal of attention as an educational tool with the potential to enhance, or even transform, student learning. Music Learning Today: Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing, and Responding to Music presents an approach to conceptualizing and utilizing technology as a tool for music learning. Designed for use by pre- and in-service music teachers, it provides the essential understandings required for educators to become adaptive experts with music technology; to be instructional designers capable of creating and implementing lessons, units, and curriculum that take advantage of technological affordances to assist students in developing their musicianship.
Most books about music and technology are technocentric, organized around specific technologies. Technological understanding is important and necessary for teachers, but research into educators’ use of technology with students indicates that knowledge of the technology alone is insufficient. While some books have described teaching strategies and attempted to align the use of technologies with broader goals (standards), none of them have offered a coherent view of the interconnectedness of musical content, pedagogy, and technology.

Grounded in the research and best practice literature, Music Learning Today makes connections among music knowledge and skill outcomes, the research on human cognition and music learning, best practices in music pedagogy, and technology. Its essential premise is that music educators and their students can benefit through use of technology as a tool to support learning in the three musical processes -creating, performing, and responding to music. The philosophical and theoretical rationales, along with the practical information discussed in the book, are applicable to all experience levels. However, the technological applications described are focused at a beginning to intermediate level, relevant to both pre-service and in-service music educators and their students.

Gerald Klickstein, “The Musician’s Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance, and Wellness”

English | 2009 | 360 pages | PDF | 2 MB
In The Musician’s Way, veteran performer and educator Gerald Klickstein combines the latest research with his 30 years of professional experience to provide aspiring musicians with a roadmap to artistic excellence. Part I, Artful Practice, describes strategies to interpret and memorize compositions, fuel motivation, collaborate, and more. Part II, Fearless Performance, lifts the lid on the hidden causes of nervousness and shows how musicians can become confident performers. Part III, Lifelong Creativity, surveys tactics to prevent music-related injuries and equips musicians to tap their own innate creativity. Written in a conversational style, The Musician’s Way presents an inclusive system for all instrumentalists and vocalists to advance their musical abilities and succeed as performing artists.

Martin Schuring, “Oboe Art and Method”

English | 2009 | 238 pages | PDF | 2 MB
Oboe Art and Method is a complete and comprehensive guide to oboe technique. Author Martin Schuring, a veteran oboe performer and instructor, describes in detail all of the basic techniques of playing (breathing, embouchure, finger technique, articulation) and reed making, with expert tips and step-by-step instructions for how best to perform each of these tasks with grace and technical efficiency. Schuring’s descriptions are straightforward and articulate, designed to encourage students to focus on the basic techniques of tone production as a springboard for more nuanced artistic development. Key sections address long-tone and scale practice in ways that go beyond advice most teachers will give their pupils, and the author’s focus on embouchure development cultivates supported breathing and blowing to help provide the best foundation for aspiring oboists. In addition, he offers chapters on the practicing, instrument care and adjustment, professional development, and career development issues, all designed to help students practice meaningfully and with purpose and guide them throughout their careers with the oboe.
A reliable source of practical and time-tested advice, Oboe Art and Technique will appeal to all who teach or are learning to play the oboe, whether at conservatories or in private instruction. A coherent overview of the fundamentals of technique, it will also be a terrific brush-up guide for professionals and amateur enthusiasts alike.

Paul Collins, “The Stylus Phantasticus and Free Keyboard Music of the North German Baroque”

English | 2005 | 248 pages | PDF | 14 MB
The concept of stylus phantasticus (or ’fantastic style’) as it was expressed in free keyboard music of the north German Baroque forms the focus of this book. Exploring both the theoretical background to the style and its application by composers and performers, Paul Collins surveys the development of Athanasius Kircher’s original concept and its influence on music theorists such as Brossard, Janovka, Mattheson, and Walther. Turning specifically to fantasist composers of keyboard works, the book examines the keyboard toccatas of Merulo, Fresobaldi, Rossi and Froberger and their influence on north German organists Tunder, Weckmann, Reincken, Buxtehude, Bruhns, Lubeck, Bohm, and Leyding. The free keyboard music of this distinguished group highlights the intriguing relationship at this time between composition and performance, the concept of fantasy, and the understanding of originality and individuality in seventeenth-century culture.

Tamara Roberts, “Resounding Afro Asia: Interracial Music and the Politics of Collaboration”

English | 2016 | 248 pages | PDF | 17 MB
Though cultural hybridity is celebrated as a hallmark of U.S. American music and identity, hybrid music is all too often marked and marketed under a single racial label.Tamara Roberts’ book Resounding Afro Asia examines music projects that foreground racial mixture in players, audiences, and sound in the face of the hypocrisy of the culture industry. Resounding Afro Asia traces a genealogy of black/Asian engagements through four contemporary case studies from Chicago, New York, and California: Funkadesi (Indian/funk/reggae), Yoko Noge (Japanese folk/blues), Fred Ho and the Afro Asian Music Ensemble (jazz/various Asian and African traditions), and Red Baraat (Indian brass band and New Orleans second line).
Roberts investigates Afro Asian musical settings as part of a genealogy of cross-racial culture and politics. These musical settings are sites of sono-racial collaboration: musical engagements in which participants pointedly use race to form and perform interracial politics. When musicians collaborate, they generate and perform racially marked sounds that do not conform to their racial identities, thus splintering the expectations of cultural determinism. The dynamic social, aesthetic, and sonic practices construct a forum for the negotiation of racial and cultural difference and the formation of inter-minority solidarities. Through improvisation and composition, artists can articulate new identities and subjectivities in conversation with each other.
Resounding Afro Asia offers a glimpse into how artists live multiracial lives in which they inhabit yet exceed multicultural frameworks built on racial essentialism and segregation. It joins a growing body of literature that seeks to write Asian American artists back into U.S. popular music history and will surely appeal to students of music, ethnomusicology, race theory, and politics, as well as those curious about the relationship between race and popular music.