Fantasyland How America Went Haywire A 500-Year History

History of Pakistan Army Aviation 1947-2007
Kurt Andersen (Author, Narrator), “Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History”
Slings & Slingstones: The Forgotten Weapons of Oceania and the Americas by Gigi York, Robert York
Leonid Livak, “The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination: A Case of Russian Literature”
Kuan-Hsing Chen, “Asia as Method: Toward Deimperialization”

History of Pakistan Army Aviation 1947-2007

Army Aviation Directorate | 2008 | ISBN: 9699246005 | English | 613 pages | PDF (e-book)| 50 MB

Kurt Andersen (Author, Narrator), “Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History”

ISBN: 1400067219 | 2017 | EPUB | 480 pages | 887 KB
A razor-sharp thinker offers a new understanding of our post-truth world and explains the American instinct to believe in make-believe, from the Pilgrims to P. T. Barnum to Disneyland to zealots of every stripe . . . to Donald Trump.
In this sweeping, eloquent history of America, Kurt Andersen demonstrates that what’s happening in our country today—this strange, post-factual, “fake news” moment we’re all living through—is not something entirely new, but rather the ultimate expression of our national character and path. America was founded by wishful dreamers, magical thinkers, and true believers, by impresarios and their audiences, by hucksters and their suckers. Believe-whatever-you-want fantasy is deeply embedded in our DNA.
Over the course of five centuries—from the Salem witch trials to Scientology to the Satanic Panic of the 1980s, from P. T. Barnum to Hollywood and the anything-goes, wild-and-crazy sixties, from conspiracy theories to our fetish for guns and obsession with extraterrestrials—our peculiar love of the fantastic has made America exceptional in a way that we’ve never fully acknowledged. With the gleeful erudition and tell-it-like-it-is ferocity of a Christopher Hitchens, Andersen explores whether the great American experiment in liberty has gone off the rails.
From the start, our ultra-individualism was attached to epic dreams and epic fantasies—every citizen was free to believe absolutely anything, or to pretend to be absolutely anybody. Little by little, and then more quickly in the last several decades, the American invent-your-own-reality legacy of the Enlightenment superseded its more sober, rational, and empirical parts. We gave ourselves over to all manner of crackpot ideas and make-believe lifestyles designed to console or thrill or terrify us. In Fantasyland, Andersen brilliantly connects the dots that define this condition, portrays its scale and scope, and offers a fresh, bracing explanation of how our American journey has deposited us here.
Fantasyland could not appear at a more perfect moment. If you want to understand the politics and culture of twenty-first-century America, if you want to know how the lines between reality and illusion have become dangerously blurred, you must read this book.
“This is an important book—the indispensable book—for understanding America in the age of Trump. It’s an eye-opening history filled with brilliant insights, a saga of how we were always susceptible to fantasy, from the Puritan fanatics to the talk-radio and Internet wackos who mix show business, hucksterism, and conspiracy theories.”—Walter Isaacson

Slings & Slingstones: The Forgotten Weapons of Oceania and the Americas by Gigi York, Robert York

English | January 1st, 2012 | ISBN: 1606351079 | 221 pages | PDF | 8.35 MB
A fascinating examination of an overlooked weaponFor most of us, our knowledge of slings and slingstones begins and ends with the biblical tale of David slaying Goliath. Scholars and archaeologists have told us that slings like the one David employed were common in the Old World, used not just for shepherd boys to kill giants but for protecting herds, hunting, and combat.
However, few scholars have addressed the function slings have occupied outside of Eurasian civilizations, especially their use in Oceania and the Americas.In this astounding new archaeological survey, authors Robert York and Gigi York examine the history of Oceania and the Americas to unveil the significant role slings and slingstones played in developing societies. They present new evidence that suggests that unlike David who plucked rounded pebbles from a stream, inhabitants of the Pacific Islands deliberately fashioned sling missiles out of coral, stone, and clay into uniquely deadly shapes.
They also show that the use of slings in the Americas was more pervasive and inclined to variability than previously recognized.Well documented, bountifully illustrated, and thoroughly researched, Slings and Slingstones is sure to engage readers interested in expanding their knowledge of the past. It is an essential reference for archaeologists, historians, and students of the history of arms and weaponry.

Leonid Livak, “The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination: A Case of Russian Literature”

2010 | ISBN-10: 0804770557 | 514 pages | PDF | 4 MB
This book argues that the representation of Jews in European literature has little to do with actual, human Jews, but rather is derived from the conception of Jews as Christianity’s paradigmatic Other, eternally reenacting their morally ambiguous New Testament role as the Christ-bearing and -killing chosen people of God.

Kuan-Hsing Chen, “Asia as Method: Toward Deimperialization”

2010 | ISBN-10: 0822346761, 0822346648 | 342 pages | PDF | 2 MB
Centering his analysis in the dynamic forces of modern East Asian history, Kuan-Hsing Chen recasts cultural studies as a politically urgent global endeavor. He argues that the intellectual and subjective work of decolonization begun across East Asia after the Second World War was stalled by the cold war. At the same time, the work of deimperialization became impossible to imagine in imperial centers such as Japan and the United States. Chen contends that it is now necessary to resume those tasks, and that decolonization, deimperialization, and an intellectual undoing of the cold war must proceed simultaneously. Combining postcolonial studies, globalization studies, and the emerging field of “Asian studies in Asia,” he insists that those on both sides of the imperial divide must assess the conduct, motives, and consequences of imperial histories.
Chen is one of the most important intellectuals working in East Asia today; his writing has been influential in Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and mainland China for the past fifteen years. As a founding member of the Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society and its journal, he has helped to initiate change in the dynamics and intellectual orientation of the region, building a network that has facilitated inter-Asian connections. Asia as Method encapsulates Chen’s vision and activities within the increasingly “inter-referencing” East Asian intellectual community and charts necessary new directions for cultural studies.