Exiles in Sepharad The Jewish Millennium in Spain

Exiles in Sepharad: The Jewish Millennium in Spain by Jeffrey Gorsky
Pius IV and the Fall of The Carafa: Nepotism and Papal Authority in Counter-Reformation Rome (Oxford Historical Monographs) by Miles Pattenden
Pierre Laroque and the Welfare State in Postwar France (Oxford Historical Monographs) by Eric Jabbari
Phillip Harding, “Didymos: On Demosthenes”
Peter Balakian, “The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response”

Exiles in Sepharad: The Jewish Millennium in Spain by Jeffrey Gorsky

2015 | ISBN: 0827612516 | English | 432 pages | EPUB | 2 MB
The dramatic one-thousand-year history of Jews in Spain comes to life in Exiles in Sepharad. Jeffrey Gorsky vividly relates this colorful period of Jewish history, from the era when Jewish culture was at its height in Muslim Spain to the horrors of the Inquisition and the Expulsion.
Twenty percent of Jews today are descended from Sephardic Jews, who created significant works in religion, literature, science, and philosophy. They flourished under both Muslim and Christian rule, enjoying prosperity and power unsurpassed in Europe. Their cultural contributions include important poets; the great Jewish philosopher Moses Maimonides; and Moses de Leon, author of the Zohar, the core text of the Kabbalah.
But these Jews also endured considerable hardship. Fundamentalist Islamic tribes drove them from Muslim to Christian Spain. In 1391 thousands were killed and more than a third were forced to convert by anti-Jewish rioters. A century later the Spanish Inquisition began, accusing thousands of these converts of heresy. By the end of the fifteenth century Jews had been expelled from Spain and forcibly converted in Portugal and Navarre. After almost a millennium of harmonious existence, what had been the most populous and prosperous Jewish community in Europe ceased to exist on the Iberian Peninsula.

Pius IV and the Fall of The Carafa: Nepotism and Papal Authority in Counter-Reformation Rome (Oxford Historical Monographs) by Miles Pattenden

2013 | ISBN: 0199670625 | English | 168 pages | PDF | 0.9 MB
Drawing from new archival research, Pius IV and the Fall of the Carafa shows how the popes of the mid-sixteenth century sought to re-assert and project their authority over the Catholic Church during the first phase of the Counter-Reformation. Its narrative focus is the trial of cardinals Carlo and Alfonso Carafa, nephews of Paul IV (1555-1559), who, together with Carlo’s brother Giovanni, were arrested and indicted by their uncle’s successor Pius IV (1559-65) on charges of murder, theft, and corruption. Taking place from June 1560 to April 1561 as preparations were underway for a resumption of the Council of Trent, this was the only occasion in the early modern period in which a papal family were impeached for their actions in government. It provided a well-publicized forum in which questions about the nature and extent of the pope’s authority were raised, contested, and answered by different groups within the Roman political and ecclesiastical elite.
While the Carafa trial has previously been understood to have been primarily of importance only to the development of papal nepotism, Miles Pattenden now demonstrates how Pius used it as a vehicle by which to intimidate the College of Cardinals and to re-impose stricter hierarchical control over the institutions of the Catholic Church.

Pierre Laroque and the Welfare State in Postwar France (Oxford Historical Monographs) by Eric Jabbari

2012 | ISBN: 0199289638 | English | 208 pages | PDF | 0.7 MB
Eric Jabbari examines Pierre Laroque’s contribution to the rise of the French welfare state, namely his role as the architect of the social security plan which was adopted by the provisional government in 1945. The conception of the Laroque Plan was a product of his work as a civil servant and social policy expert, and it reflected the diverse combination of influences: his background in administrative law and his onetime support for the corporatist management of industrial relations. These experiences were all the more notable since they were marked by his belief in the necessity of an increased state interventionism which was mitigated by administrative decentralisation. The purpose of social policy, in his mind, was to cultivate social solidarity, a task which could best be achieved if the beneficiaries of this policy could be encouraged to participate in its implementation. These concerns remained central to his conception of the state and society long after he lost his enthusiasm for corporatism, and contributed to the shape of post-war social security.

Phillip Harding, “Didymos: On Demosthenes”

2006 | ISBN-10: 0198150431, 0199283591 | 300 pages | PDF | 14 MB
This edition of the papyrus containing Didymos’ comments on some of Demosthenes’ speeches aims to provide the student with a new reading of the text, a facing translation that is carefully edited for those who cannot use the Greek to show what is extant and what is restored, and a detailed commentary that considers all issues related to the restoration of the text and to its historical content. All Greek is translated into English so that the discussion is fully accessible. In addition, throughout the introduction and commentary an attempt is made to arrive at a balanced appraisal of Didymos’ position in the history of scholarship.

Peter Balakian, “The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response”

English | 2003 | ISBN: 0060198400, 0060558709 | 496 pages | EPUB | 0.9 MB
Awarded the Raphael Lemkin Prize for the best scholarly book on genocide by the Institute for Genocide Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY Graduate Center.
In this groundbreaking history of the Armenian Genocide, the critically acclaimed author of the memoir Black Dog of Fate brings us a riveting narrative of the massacres of the Armenians in the 1890s and genocide in 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Turks. Using rarely seen archival documents and remarkable first-person accounts, Peter Balakian presents the chilling history of how the Young Turk government implemented the first modern genocide behind the cover of World War I. And in the telling, he also resurrects an extraordinary lost chapter of American history.
During the United States’ ascension in the global arena at the turn of the twentieth century, America’s humanitarian movement for Armenia was an important part of the rising nation’s first epoch of internationalism. Intellectuals, politicians, diplomats, religious leaders, and ordinary citizens came together to try to save the Armenians. The Burning Tigris reconstructs this landmark American cause that was spearheaded by the passionate commitments and commentaries of a remarkable cast of public figures, including Julia Ward Howe, Clara Barton, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ambassador Henry Morgenthau, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Alice Stone Blackwell, Stephen Crane, and Ezra Pound, as well as courageous missionaries, diplomats, and relief workers who recorded their eyewitness accounts and often risked their lives in the killing fields of Armenia.
The crisis of the “starving Armenians” was so embedded in American popular culture that, in an age when a loaf of bread cost a nickel, the American people sent more than $100 million in aid through the American Committee on Armenian Atrocities and its successor, Near East Relief. In 1915 alone, the New York Times published 145 articles about the Armenian Genocide.
Theodore Roosevelt called the extermination of the Armenians “the greatest crime of the war.” But in the turmoil following World War I, it was a crime that went largely unpunished. In depicting the 1919 Ottoman court-martial trials, Balakian reveals the perpetrators of the Armenian Genocide confessing their guilt – an astonishing fact given the Turkish government’s continued denial of the Genocide.
After World War I, U.S. oil interests in the Middle East steered America away from the course it had pursued for four decades. As Balakian eloquently points out, America’s struggle between human rights and national self-interest – a pattern that would be repeated again and again – resonates powerfully today. In crucial ways, America’s involvement with the Armenian Genocide is a paradigm for the modern age.