Cornell ’77 The Music, the Myth, and the Magnificence of the Grateful Dead’s Concert at Barton Hall

Music

Cornell ’77: The Music, the Myth, and the Magnificence of the Grateful Dead’s Concert at Barton Hall by Peter Conners
Nick Collins, Julio d’Escrivan, “The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music”
Nicholas Cook , “The Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music”
Russell Hartenberger, “The Cambridge Companion to Percussion”
Simple Songs for Ukulele: The Easiest Tunes to Strum & Sing on Ukulele by Hal Leonard Corporation

Cornell ’77: The Music, the Myth, and the Magnificence of the Grateful Dead’s Concert at Barton Hall by Peter Conners

English | April 11th, 2017 | ISBN: 150170432X | 264 pages | PDF | 105.01 MB
On May 8, 1977, at Barton Hall, on the Cornell University campus, in front of 8,500 eager fans, the Grateful Dead played a show so significant that the Library of Congress inducted it into the National Recording Registry. The band had just released Terrapin Station and had not toured for twenty months. In 1977, the Grateful Dead reached a musical peak, and their East Coast spring tour featured an exceptional string of performances, including the one at Cornell.
Many Deadheads claim that the quality of the live recording of the show made by Betty Cantor-Jackson (a member of the crew) elevated its importance. Once those recordings ― referred to as “Betty Boards” ― began to circulate among Deadheads, the reputation of the Cornell ’77 show grew exponentially. That aura grew with time and, in the community of Deadheads and audiophiles, the show at Barton Hall acquired legendary status.
Rooted in dozens of interviews ― including a conversation with Betty Cantor-Jackson about her recording ― and accompanied by a dazzling selection of never-before-seen concert photographs, Cornell ’77 is about far more than just a single Grateful Dead concert. It is a social and cultural history of one of America’s most enduring and iconic musical acts, their devoted fans, and a group of Cornell students whose passion for music drove them to bring the Dead to Barton Hall.
Peter Conners has intimate knowledge of the fan culture surrounding the Dead, and his expertise brings the show to life. He leads readers through a song-by-song analysis of the performance, from “New Minglewood Blues” to “One More Saturday Night,” and conveys why, forty years later, Cornell ’77 is still considered a touchstone in the history of the band.

Nick Collins, Julio d’Escrivan, “The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music”

2007 | ISBN-10: 0521868610, 0521688655 | 314 pages | EPUB | 2 MB
Musicians are always quick to adopt and explore new technologies. The fast-paced changes wrought by electrification, from the microphone via the analogue synthesiser to the laptop computer, have led to a wide diversity of new musical styles and techniques. Electronic music has grown to a broad field of investigation, taking in historical movements such as musique concrète and elektronische musik, and contemporary trends such as electronic dance music and electronica. A fascinating array of composers and inventors have contributed to a diverse set of technologies, practices and music. This book brings together some novel threads through this scene, from the viewpoint of researchers at the forefront of the sonic explorations empowered by electronic technology. The chapters provide accessible and insightful overviews of core topic areas and uncover some hitherto less publicised corners of worldwide movements. Recent areas of intense activity such as audiovisuals, live electronic music, interactivity and network music are actively promoted.

Nicholas Cook , “The Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music”

2011 | ISBN-10: 0521684617, 0521865824 | 380 pages | PDF | 2 MB
From the cylinder to the download, the practice of music has been radically transformed by the development of recording and playback technologies. This Companion provides a detailed overview of the transformation, encompassing both classical and popular music. Topics covered include the history of recording technology and the businesses built on it; the impact of recording on performance styles; studio practices, viewed from the perspectives of performer, producer and engineer; and approaches to the study of recordings. The main chapters are interspersed by ‘short takes’ – short contributions by different practitioners, ranging from classical or pop producers and performers to record collectors. Combining basic information with a variety of perspectives on records and recordings, this book will appeal not only to students in a range of subjects from music to the media, but also to general readers interested in a fundamental yet insufficiently understood dimension of musical culture.

Russell Hartenberger, “The Cambridge Companion to Percussion”

2016 | ISBN-10: 1107472431, 1107093457 | 310 pages | EPUB | 2 MB
Percussion music is both the oldest and most recent of musical genres and exists in diverse forms throughout the world. This Companion explores percussion and rhythm from the perspectives of performers, composers, conductors, instrument builders, scholars, and cognitive scientists. Topics covered include percussion in symphony orchestras from the nineteenth century to today and the development of percussion instruments in chapters on the marimba revolution, the percussion industry, drum machines, and the effect of acoustics. Chapters also investigate drum set playing and the influences of world music on Western percussion, and outline the roles of percussionists as composers, conductors, soloists, chamber musicians, and theatrical performers. Developments in scientific research are explored in chapters on the perception of sound and the evolution of musical rhythm. This book will be a valuable resource for students, percussionists, and all those who want a deeper understanding of percussion music and rhythm.

Simple Songs for Ukulele: The Easiest Tunes to Strum & Sing on Ukulele by Hal Leonard Corporation

English | May 1st, 2016 | ASIN: B01FPR623Q, ISBN: 1495059723 | 136 pages | EPUB | 26.49 MB
50 favorites for standard G-C-E-A ukulele tuning, including: All Along the Watchtower Burning House Can’t Help Falling in Love Don’t Worry, Be Happy Folsom Prison Blues Ho Hey I’m Yours King of the Road Lava Rude Stand by Me Sweet Home Alabama You Are My Sunshine * and more.