Caryl Churchill, “Cloud 9”

Politics, Sociology

Caryl Churchill, “Cloud 9”
Filippo Osella, Caroline Osella, “Islamic Reform in South Asia”
Michael Perelman, “Class Warfare in the Information Age”
Heteromation, and Other Stories of Computing and Capitalism (Acting with Technology) by Hamid R. Ekbia, Bonnie A. Nardi
The Sociology of Marx by Henri Lefebvre

Caryl Churchill, “Cloud 9”

English | 1994 | 88 pages | EPUB | 0.6 MB
Cloud 9 is about relationships – between women and men, men and men, women and women. It is about sex, work, mothers, Africa, power, children, grandmothers, politics, money, Queen Victoria and Sex. Cloud 9 premiered in London at the Royal Court Theatre in 1979, then was revived for a two-year run in New York City (1981). It has since been staged all over the world.
Caryl Churchill has written for the stage, television and radio. A renowned and prolific playwright, her plays include Cloud Nine, Top Girls, Far Away, Drunk Enough to Say I Love You?, Bliss, Love and Information, Mad Forest and A Number. In 2002, she received the Obie Lifetime Achievement Award and 2010, she was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.

Filippo Osella, Caroline Osella, “Islamic Reform in South Asia”

2013 | pages: 540 | PDF | 2,3 mb
The articles in this volume build up ethnographic analysis complementary to the historiography of South Asian Islam, which has explored the emergence of reformism in the context of specific political and religious circumstances of nineteenth century British India. Taking up diverse popular and scholarly debates as well as everyday religious practices, this volume also breaks away from the dominant trend of mainstream ethnographic work, which celebrates sufi-inspired forms of Islam as tolerant, plural, authentic and so on, pitted against a ‘reformist’ Islam. Urging a more nuanced examination of all forms of reformism and their reception in practice, the contributions here powerfully demonstrate the historical and geographical specificities of reform projects. In doing so, they challenge prevailing perspectives in which substantially different traditions of reform are lumped together into one reified category (often carelessly shorthanded as ‘wah’habism’) and branded as extremist – if not altogether demonised as terrorist.

Michael Perelman, “Class Warfare in the Information Age”

2000 | pages: 160 | PDF | 7,3 mb
In Class Warfare in the Information Age, Michael Perelman reveals how the efforts of business to profit from the sale of information will result in a reduction rather than an increase in access to information. He demonstrates how the treatment of information as a commodity will cause it to be more regulated and less accessible. In the future, Perelman argues, accessing and affording information will still be a class-based privilege, and the rights of individuals will disintegrate as the power of the corporate sector grows. Class Warfare in the Information Age is a refreshingly critical work that forces readers to rethink the conventional hype surrounding the information superhighway.

Heteromation, and Other Stories of Computing and Capitalism (Acting with Technology) by Hamid R. Ekbia, Bonnie A. Nardi

2017 | English | 280 pages | PDF | 3 MB
The computerization of the economy – and everyday life – has transformed the division of labor between humans and machines, shifting many people into work that is hidden, poorly compensated, or accepted as part of being a “user” of digital technology. Through our clicks and swipes, logins and profiles, emails and posts, we are, more or less willingly, participating in digital activities that yield economic value to others but little or no return to us. Hamid Ekbia and Bonnie Nardi call this kind of participation – the extraction of economic value from low-cost or free labor in computer-mediated networks – “heteromation.” In this book, they explore the social and technological processes through which economic value is extracted from digitally mediated work, the nature of the value created, and what prompts people to participate in the process.
Arguing that heteromation is a new logic of capital accumulation, Ekbia and Nardi consider different kinds of heteromated labor: communicative labor, seen in user-generated content on social media; cognitive labor, including microwork and self-service; creative labor, from gaming environments to literary productions; emotional labor, often hidden within paid jobs; and organizing labor, made up of collaborative groups such as citizen scientists. Ekbia and Nardi then offer a utopian vision: heteromation refigured to bring end users more fully into the prosperity of capitalism.

The Sociology of Marx by Henri Lefebvre

English | February 18th, 2015 | 214 pages | EPUB | 1.78 MB
This classic study by Henri Lefebvre “raises the question whether today we must study Marx as we study Plato, or rather whether Marx’s work retains a contemporary value and significance; in other words, whether his work contributes to an elucidation of the contemporary world.” For Lefebvre, Marx’s thought remains a key­perhaps even the key­to an understanding of modern societies and modern reality.

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