The Life and Times of Little Richard

Biographies

The Life and Times of Little Richard by Charles White
Love Him Madly: An Intimate Memoir of Jim Morrison by Judy Huddleston
Jim St. Germain, “A Stone of Hope: A Memoir”
John J. Pershing, “My Life before the World War, 1860–1917: A Memoir (American Warriors Series)”
Cherry Lewis, “The Enlightened Mr. Parkinson: The Pioneering Life of a Forgotten Surgeon”

The Life and Times of Little Richard by Charles White

When Little Richard burst onto the scene in the early 1950s, he sounded like nothing on earth. Drenched in sweat, screaming, hollering and pumping his piano, he made all who followed soud tame.
His stage act was so explosive that for years people assumed the real man could never match the flamboyant public image. Here comes Charles White’s sensational book exposing the even more astonishing life and times of Richard Wayne Penniman from Macon, Georgia. Illustrated with pictures from Little Richard’s own archive and including a comprehensive discography.

Love Him Madly: An Intimate Memoir of Jim Morrison by Judy Huddleston

Chronicling a young woman’s four-year relationship with the lead singer of the Doors, this intensely intimate memoir provides a direct and unprecedented view of the late-1960s Los Angeles subculture. When Judy Huddleston’s parents got divorced, she spent her last year of high school attending concerts.
Transformed from a perceptive child into a rebellious teenager bent on attracting boys and fueled by psychedelics, she had lost her sense of self. That’s when Jim Morrison came into her life. Honest, funny and direct, Huddleston provides an emotional portrayal of an unbalanced sexual relationship with a man whose demons haunted everyone he knew, while offering an even-handed portrait of Jim as a complex human being. Written in the idealistic and simultaneously jaded voice of a teenager, this is a tale of sex, obsession, misplaced spirituality, and an unforgettable fall from innocence.

Jim St. Germain, “A Stone of Hope: A Memoir”

In the tradition of The Other Wes Moore and Just Mercy, a searing memoir and clarion call to save our at-risk youth by a young black man who himself was a lost cause—until he landed in a rehabilitation program that saved his life and gave him purpose.
Born into abject poverty in Haiti, young Jim St. Germain moved to Brooklyn’s Crown Heights, into an overcrowded apartment with his family. He quickly adapted to street life and began stealing, dealing drugs, and growing increasingly indifferent to despair and violence. By the time he was arrested for dealing crack cocaine, he had been handcuffed more than a dozen times. A convicted felon at age fifteen, the walls of the system were closing around him.
But instead of prison, St. Germain was placed in “Boys Town,” a nonsecure detention facility designed for rehabilitation. Surrounded by mentors and positive male authority who enforced a system based on structure and privileges rather than intimidation and punishment, St. Germain slowly found his way, eventually getting his GED and graduating from college. Then he made the bravest decision of his life: to live, as an adult, in the projects where he had lost himself, and to work to reform the way the criminal justice system treats at-risk youth.
A Stone of Hope is more than an incredible coming-of-age story; told with a degree of candor that requires the deepest courage, it is also a rallying cry. No one is who they are going to be—or capable of being—at sixteen. St. Germain is living proof of this. He contends that we must work to build a world in which we do not give up on a swath of the next generation.
Passionate, eloquent, and timely, illustrated with photographs throughout, A Stone of Hope is an inspiring challenge for every American, and is certain to spark debate nationwide.

John J. Pershing, “My Life before the World War, 1860–1917: A Memoir (American Warriors Series)”

Few American military figures are more revered than General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing (1860—1948), who is most famous for leading the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The only soldier besides George Washington to be promoted to the highest rank in the U.S. Army (General of the Armies), Pershing was a mentor to the generation of generals who led America’s forces during the Second World War.
Though Pershing published a two-volume memoir, My Experiences in the World War, and has been the subject of numerous biographies, few know that he spent many years drafting a memoir of his experiences prior to the First World War. In My Life Before the World War, 1860—1917, John T. Greenwood rescues this vital resource from obscurity, making Pershing’s valuable insights into key events in history widely available for the first time.
Pershing performed frontier duty against the Apaches and Sioux from 1886—1891, fought in Cuba in 1898, served three tours of duty in the Philippines, and was an observer with the Japanese Army in 1905 during the Russo-Japanese War. He also commanded the Mexican Punitive Expedition to capture Pancho Villa in 1916—1917. My Life Before the World War provides a rich personal account of events, people, and places as told by an observer at the center of the action. Carefully edited and annotated, this memoir is a significant contribution to our understanding of a legendary American soldier and the historic events in which he participated.

Cherry Lewis, “The Enlightened Mr. Parkinson: The Pioneering Life of a Forgotten Surgeon”

A colorful and absorbing portrait of James Parkinson and the turbulent, intellectually vibrant world of Georgian London.
Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, with 60,000 new cases each year in the United States alone, yet few know anything about the man the disease is named after. In 1817―two hundred years years ago―James Parkinson (1755–1824) defined this mysterious ailment so precisely that we still diagnose Parkinson’s Disease today by recognizing the symptoms he identified.
The story of this remarkable man’s contributions to the Age of the Enlightenment is told through his three seemingly disparate passions: medicine, politics and fossils. As a political radical, Parkinson was interrogated over a plot to kill King George III and was in danger of exile. But simultaneously, he was helping Edward Jenner set up smallpox vaccination stations across London and writing the first scientific study of fossils in English, jump-starting a national craze. He is one of the intellectual pioneers of “the age of wonder,” forgotten to history, but Cherry Lewis restores this amazing man to his rightful place in history with her evocative portrait of the man and his era. one 8-page color insert