The Enterprise of Law Justice Without the State

Politics, Sociology

Bruce L. Benson, “The Enterprise of Law: Justice Without the State”
Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism: An Introduction to Cognitive Materialism (Critical Digital and Social Media Studies) by Mariano Zukerfeld
The Principle of Unrest: Activist Philosophy in the Expanded Field (Immediations) by Brian Massumi
Like the Sound of a Drum: Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut by Peter Kulchyski
AI Civil Rights: Addressing Civil Rights for Artificial Intelligence by Jason P Doherty

Bruce L. Benson, “The Enterprise of Law: Justice Without the State”

In the minds of many, the provision of justice and security has long been linked to the state. To ask whether non-state institutions could deliver those services on their own, without the aid of coercive taxation and a monopoly franchise, runs the risk of being branded as naive anarchism or dangerous radicalism. Defenders of the state’s monopoly on lawmaking and law enforcement typically assume that any alternative arrangement would favor the rich at the expense of the poor—or would lead to the collapse of social order and ignite a war. Questioning how well these beliefs hold up to scrutiny, this book offers a powerful rebuttal of the received view of the relationship between law and government. The book argues not only that the state is unnecessary for the establishment and enforcement of law, but also that non-state institutions would fight crime, resolve disputes, and render justice more effectively than the state, based on their stronger incentives.

Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism: An Introduction to Cognitive Materialism (Critical Digital and Social Media Studies) by Mariano Zukerfeld

Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism proposes a new critical theory concerning the functioning of capitalism and how we consider knowledge and information.
This ambitious book systematically and lucidly introduces contemporary phenomena into the framework of cognitive materialism to address some of the great themes of the social sciences: knowledge, exploitation and social class in an account of capitalism’s totality in the present day. Author Mariano Zukerfeld reinvigorates materialist study of communications, presenting a typology of knowledge to explain the underlying material forms of information, intellectual property and cognitive work in contemporary societies. Using current examples the book also examines concerns such as free labour and the pivotal role of intellectual property.
The book offers nothing less than an introduction to the theory of cognitive materialism and an account of the entirety of the digital (or knowledge) capitalism of our time.

The Principle of Unrest: Activist Philosophy in the Expanded Field (Immediations) by Brian Massumi

There is no such thing as rest. The world is always on the move. It is made of movement. We find ourselves always in the midst of it, in transformations under way. The basic category for understanding is activity – and only derivatively subject, object, rule, order. What is called for is an “activist” philosophy based on these premises. The Principle of Unrest explores the contemporary implications of an activist philosophy, pivoting on the issue of movement. Movement is understood not simply in spatial terms but as qualitative transformation: becoming, emergence, event. Neoliberal capitalism’s special relation to movement is of central concern. Its powers of mobilization now descend to the emergent level of just-forming potential. This carries them beyond power-over to powers-to-bring-to-be, or what the book terms “ontopower.” It is necessary to track capitalist power throughout the expanded of emergence in order to understand how counter-powers can resist its capture and rival it on its own immanent ground. At the emergent level, at the eventful first flush of their arising, counter-powers are always collective. This even applies to movements of thought. Thought in the making is collective expression. How can we think this transindividuality of thought? What practices can address it? How, politically, can we understand the concept of the event to emergently include events of thought? Only by attuning to the creative unrest always agitating at the infra-individual level, in direct connection with the transindividual level, bypassing the mid-level of what was traditionally taken for a sovereign subject: by embracing our “dividuality.”

Like the Sound of a Drum: Aboriginal Cultural Politics in Denendeh and Nunavut by Peter Kulchyski

Part ethnography, part narrative, Like the Sound of a Drum is evocative, confrontational, and poetic. For many years, Peter Kulchyski has travelled to the north, where he has sat in on community meetings, interviewed elders and Aboriginal politicians, and participated in daily life. In Like the Sound of a Drum he looks as three northern communities — Fort Simpson and Fort Good Hope in Denendeh and Pangnirtung in Nunavut — and their strategies for maintaining their political and cultural independence. In the face of overwhelming odds, communities such as these have shown remarkable resources for creative resistance. In the process, they are changing the concept of democracy as it is practised in Canada.

AI Civil Rights: Addressing Civil Rights for Artificial Intelligence by Jason P Doherty

Should artificial intelligence be granted civil rights?
Is an AI civil rights movement on the horizon? Let’s explore the possibilities of granting or denying artificial intelligence the rights enjoyed by US citizens. Decide for yourself if AI should be considered ‘people’, and whether or not they should be granted their own rights. What would be the constitutional thing to do in the case of artificial intelligence and robot rights? As artificial intelligence improves, questions about integrating sentient ai with human civilization arise. World governments are already introducing new legislation protecting the rights of Electronic Persons. (EU) A BILL OF ROBOT RIGHTS? This book considers the rights of United States citizens, taken from the Bill of Rights, the first 10 Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, as they would apply to artificial intelligence. The benefits and drawbacks of giving or denying individual rights are presented matter of factly. I take no side. WHY I WROTE THIS BOOK: “The key issue as to whether or not a non-biological entity deserves rights really comes down to whether or not it’s conscious…. Does it have feelings?” – Ray Kurzweil “Whether we are based on carbon or on silicon makes no fundamental difference; we should each be treated with appropriate respect.” – Arthur C. Clarke, 2010: Odyssey Two “The folks at Singularity Hub pose the following question – if/when an artificial intelligence is created that matches the intellect of a human, should such intelligences be granted full civil rights?” – Alex Knapp, Forbes Decide for yourself if you think AI should be protected by law.