Mohammed’s Koran-Why Muslims Kill For Islam

Politics, Sociology

Mohammed’s Koran: Why Muslims Kill For Islam by Peter McLoughlin, Tommy Robinson
How China Escaped the Poverty Trap (Cornell Studies in Political Economy) by Yuen Yuen Ang
The Politics of Healthcare Reform in Turkey by Volkan Yilmaz
State Succession in Cultural Property (Cultural Heritage Law and Policy) by Andrzej Jakubowski
Speaking Truths to Power: Policy Ethnography and Police Reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) by Jarrett Blaustein

Mohammed’s Koran: Why Muslims Kill For Islam by Peter McLoughlin, Tommy Robinson

Why is it that almost all the terrorism in the West is coming from the small minority of the population who are Muslims? Why are they doing this if, as politicians and clergy keep assuring us, Islam is a religion of peace? We are sure these questions are being asked in most homes. Your questions are answered in this book.
The truth is that Islam is a religion of war, and the educated elite in the West have had proof of this for over 150 years. But since 9/11 they have been actively deceiving the rest of the population – because the elite dare not tackle the problem. Our journalists have totally failed in their function to challenge and correct the lies of politicians. So, the problem with Islam in the West has grown worse every year since the early 1990s. There is no sign that anything will be done to stop this until ordinary people take it upon themselves to understand Islam and expose the lies which paralyse the Westʼs discussions of Islam.
This book provides you with a revolutionary way to understand Islam: you can understand the Koran within minutes instead of months. You will have concrete evidence that any part of the Koran which appears peaceful has been cancelled by a later command to be violent. You will see Islamʼs hatred and contempt for non-Muslims laid bare. When teachers indoctrinate your children or force them to attend a mosque, use our book to shame these educators for their part in the deception. After reading this book you will understand the threat facing your childrenʼs future and you will have the knowledge to make politicians find some backbone.

How China Escaped the Poverty Trap (Cornell Studies in Political Economy) by Yuen Yuen Ang

Before markets opened in 1978, China was an impoverished planned economy governed by a Maoist bureaucracy. In just three decades it evolved into the world’s second-largest economy and is today guided by highly entrepreneurial bureaucrats. In How China Escaped the Poverty Trap, Yuen Yuen Ang explains this astonishing metamorphosis. Rather than insist that either strong institutions of good governance foster markets or that growth enables good governance, Ang lays out a new, dynamic framework for understanding development broadly. Successful development, she contends, is a coevolutionary process in which markets and governments mutually adapt.
By mapping this coevolution, Ang reveals a startling conclusion: poor and weak countries can escape the poverty trap by first harnessing weak institutions―features that defy norms of good governance―to build markets. Further, she stresses that adaptive processes, though essential for development, do not automatically occur. Highlighting three universal roadblocks to adaptation, Ang identifies how Chinese reformers crafted enabling conditions for effective improvisation.
How China Escaped the Poverty Trap offers the most complete synthesis to date of the numerous interacting forces that have shaped China’s dramatic makeover and the problems it faces today. Looking beyond China, Ang also traces the coevolutionary sequence of development in late medieval Europe, antebellum United States, and contemporary Nigeria, and finds surprising parallels among these otherwise disparate cases. Indispensable to all who care about development, this groundbreaking book challenges the convention of linear thinking and points to an alternative path out of poverty traps.

The Politics of Healthcare Reform in Turkey by Volkan Yilmaz

This book explores the transformation in the healthcare system in Turkey since 2003, which has been portrayed as a benchmark for building universal healthcare systems in emerging market economies. Focussing on healthcare politics in an under-researched developing country context, it fills a significant lacuna in existing scholarship. This study answers these questions: What were the political dynamics that enabled the introduction of healthcare reform in Turkey? What political conflicts did the reform generate? How and to whose benefit have these conflicts been resolved? Drawing on qualitative interviews with a diverse set of actors, Yılmaz explores the actors’ subjective interpretations of the reform, the discourses and strategies they used to influence the reform, and the changing healthcare politics scene. He demonstrates that the reform has been a complex political process within which actors negotiated whether and to what extent healthcare remains a citizenship right or a commodity. This book will appeal to students and scholars of social policy, politics, health policy, public health and sociology.

State Succession in Cultural Property (Cultural Heritage Law and Policy) by Andrzej Jakubowski

The demise and rebirth of states brings with it a set of very complicated legal issues, among which is the question of how to deal with that state’s cultural heritage, whether within its boundaries or not. Through a historical analysis of state dissolution and succession and its impact on cultural heritage from 1815 to present day, the work will identify guiding principles to facilitate the conclusion of agreements on the status of cultural property following the succession of states. Studying primary materials and evidence of state practice that has not been available before, the work will propose a novel approach to state succession from the perspective of the emerging interest of the international community to safeguard cultural heritage. State succession is one of the most obscure areas of international law since its rules are characterized either by their absence or their inconsistency.
This book explores to what extent the principles and practice of state succession correspond to the evolution of the concept of cultural heritage in international law. It provides an extensive analysis of the alternations of the international practice and legal doctrine of state succession to tangible cultural heritage since the formation of the European nation-states in the nineteenth century – through the experience of decolonization to the post-Cold War dissolution of multinational states.

Speaking Truths to Power: Policy Ethnography and Police Reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Clarendon Studies in Criminology) by Jarrett Blaustein

Speaking Truths to Power: Policy Ethnography and Police Reform in Bosnia and Herzegovina presents a rigorous institutional-level analysis of the effects of globalisation on local policing, drawing on data generated from two ethnographic case studies conducted in 2011 in the transitional, post-conflict society of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Through a study of the structures, mentalities and practices, it situates the phenomenon of ‘glocal policing’ in relation to the converging development and security discourses following the collapse of the Soviet Union, and raises important questions about the purpose and value of criminological engagement with transitional policing.
The idea of ‘speaking truths to power’ (as opposed to a single ‘truth’) is illustrated by the author’s 2011 fieldwork, covering active police capacity building projects implemented by international organisations. Both studies indicate that global inequalities affect police reform projects, but also that nodal opportunities do exist for seemingly disempowered stakeholders, specifically international development workers and rank-and-file police officers, to exercise reflexivity and use their available power resources to mitigate structural harms, thus rendering their work responsive to the needs of policy recipients. This mediatory role is then analysed through the conceptual lens of ‘policy translation’, providing an innovative framework for interpreting how policy meaning and content are altered as a result of their transmission between contexts.
Through detailed and persuasive investigation, Speaking Truths to Power argues that it is time for criminology to move beyond the established broad structural critiques of transnational policing power. As the author demonstrates, an institutional perspective employing ethnographic methods can ensure that the revealed criticisms adequately reflect the diverse interests, experiences and understandings of the research participants.

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