Mike Summerbee – an Autobiogrphy The Story of a True City Legend

Biographies

Mike Summerbee – an Autobiogrphy: The Story of a True City Legend by Mike Summerbee, Jim Holden
Eve Lazarus “Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders”
Lawrence P. Jackson “Chester B. Himes: A Biography”
The Untold Journey: The Life of Diana Trilling by Natalie Robins
Forging the Past: Seth and the Art of Memory by Daniel Marrone

Mike Summerbee – an Autobiogrphy: The Story of a True City Legend by Mike Summerbee, Jim Holden

Eve Lazarus “Cold Case Vancouver: The City’s Most Baffling Unsolved Murders”

The untold story behind some of Vancouver’s notorious unsolved murder cases.
Finalist, Bill Duthie Booksellers’ Choice Award (BC Book Prizes)
While Vancouver is much loved by tourists and locals alike for its spectacular natural scenery and diverse culture, behind that facade lurks a violent past. Cold Case Vancouver takes a look at the city’s disreputable side by revisiting some of its infamous cold murder cases from 1944 to 1996.
There are literally hundreds of murders that remain unsolved in Vancouver, some dating back decades; their victims are now essentially invisible, forgotten by everyone except family and friends. Sometimes their cases are looked at again with a fresh set of eyes and the benefit of new technologies; sometimes they are even solved. Most often, however, the crimes remain a mystery, consigned to the city’s dark history.
Part history book, part crime story, Cold Case Vancouver delves into 50 years of some of Vancouver’s most baffling unsolved murders. In 1953, in what became known as the “Babes in the Woods” story, two little boys were found murdered in Stanley Park and remain unidentified to this day. In 1975, a 22-year-old country singer just back from Nashville was murdered, just as she was on the verge of an amazing career. Ten years later, Jimmy and Lily Ming were kidnapped from their Strathcona home and found murdered six weeks later. And there’s the 1994 disappearance of Nick Masee, a retired banker with connections to the renegade Vancouver Stock Exchange who, along with his wife Lisa, were taken from their home, their bodies never found.
Meticulously researched, giving insight into police procedures and forensics, and including new interviews with those connected to the original cases, Cold Case Vancouver is a fascinating look at Vancouver’s criminal past.

Lawrence P. Jackson “Chester B. Himes: A Biography”

The definitive biography of the groundbreaking African American author who had an extraordinary legacy on black writers globally.
Chester B. Himes has been called “one of the towering figures of the black literary tradition” (Henry Louis Gates Jr.), “the best writer of mayhem yarns since Raymond Chandler” (San Francisco Chronicle), and “a quirky American genius” (Walter Mosely). He was the twentieth century’s most prolific black writer, captured the spirit of his times expertly, and left a distinctive mark on American literature. Yet today he stands largely forgotten.
In this definitive biography of Chester B. Himes (1909–1984), Lawrence P. Jackson uses exclusive interviews and unrestricted access to Himes’s full archives to portray a controversial American writer whose novels unflinchingly confront sex, racism, and black identity. Himes brutally rendered racial politics in the best-selling novel If He Hollers Let Him Go, but he became famous for his Harlem detective series, including Cotton Comes to Harlem. A serious literary tastemaker in his day, Himes had friendships—sometimes uneasy—with such luminaries as Ralph Ellison, Carl Van Vechten, and Richard Wright.
Jackson’s scholarship and astute commentary illuminates Himes’s improbable life—his middle-class origins, his eight years in prison, his painful odyssey as a black World War II–era artist, and his escape to Europe for success. More than ten years in the writing, Jackson’s biography restores the legacy of a fascinating maverick caught between his aspirations for commercial success and his disturbing, vivid portraits of the United States.

The Untold Journey: The Life of Diana Trilling by Natalie Robins

Throughout her life, Diana Trilling (1905-1996) wrote about profound social changes with candor and wisdom, first for The Nation and later for Partisan Review, Harpers, and such popular magazines as Vogue and McCalls. She went on to publish five books, including the best-selling Mrs. Harris: The Death of the Scarsdale Diet Doctor, written when she was in her late seventies. She was also one half of one of the most famous intellectual couples in the United States. Diana Trilling’s life with Columbia University professor and literary critic Lionel Trilling was filled with secrets, struggles, and betrayals, and she endured what she called her “own private hell” as she fought to reconcile competing duties and impulses at home and at work. She was a feminist, yet she insisted that women’s liberation created unnecessary friction with men, asserting that her career ambitions should be on equal footing with caring for her child and supporting her husband. She fearlessly expressed sensitive, controversial, and moral views, and fought publicly with Lillian Hellman, among other celebrated writers and intellectuals, over politics. Diana Trilling was an anticommunist liberal, a position often misunderstood, especially by her literary and university friends. And finally, she was among the “New Journalists” who transformed writing and reporting in the 1960s, making her nonfiction as imaginative in style and scope as a novel. The first biographer to mine Diana Trilling’s extensive archives, Natalie Robins tells a previously undisclosed history of an essential member of New York City culture at a time of dynamic change and intellectual relevance.

Forging the Past: Seth and the Art of Memory by Daniel Marrone

At once familiar and hard to place, the work of acclaimed Canadian cartoonist Seth evokes a world that no longer exists–and perhaps never existed, except in the panels of long-forgotten comics. Seth’s distinctive drawing style strikingly recalls a bygone era of cartooning, an apt vehicle for melancholy, gently ironic narratives that depict the grip of the past on the present. Even when he appears to look to the past, however, Seth (born Gregory Gallant) is constantly pushing the medium of comics forward with sophisticated work that often incorporates metafiction, parody, and formal experimentation.
Forging the Past offers a comprehensive account of this work and the complex interventions it makes into the past. Moving beyond common notions of nostalgia, Daniel Marrone explores the various ways in which Seth’s comics induce readers to participate in forging histories and memories. Marrone discusses collecting, Canadian identity, New Yorker cartoons, authenticity, artifice, and ambiguity–all within the context comics’ unique structure and texture. Seth’s comics are suffused with longing for the past, but on close examination this longing is revealed to be deeply ambivalent, ironic, and self-aware.
Marrone undertakes the most thorough, sustained investigation of Seth’s work to date, while advancing a broader argument about how comics operate as a literary medium. Included as an appendix is a substantial interview, conducted by the author, in which Seth candidly discusses his work, his peers, and his influences.